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Dahole
08-29-2006, 10:40 PM
A friend of my mom's is wanting to buy some bulk honey from me for mead. I get $3 per pound when I sell it by the quart ($12)

How much per pound are you folks selling your honey for? If nobody is selling any, what are you guys having to pay per pound?

For the record he said he last paid $1.50 per pound when he bought it by the pail. I thought that was a hell of a deal and he should buy all he can at that price.

akueck
08-30-2006, 01:40 AM
My LHBS sells orange blossom and clover for $2.50/lb and I consider that a really good deal (esp since it's for any amount). If I'm lazy I buy it at the supermarket (albeit a super-crunchy-market) for $3.50-$4/lb in "bulk" ~1.5 lb containers--they sell wildflower, sage, buckwheat, and occasionally some others.

Oskaar
08-30-2006, 03:49 AM
I generally pay about $1.50/pound here in California, sometimes a bit more. Speciality honeys can be more expensive, but they better be damned special if they're $3/lb.

Cheers,

Oskaar

Recluse
08-30-2006, 08:34 AM
All the local Apiaries/farm markets around here (New Jersey) seem to get around $3/lb in bulk (5 lb). Mostly non-varietal wildflower honey, and usually $14-15/5lb and more per lb for the smaller sizes.

Still, looking forward to making a local wildflower batch after I cut my teeth on some of the Tried and True newbie recipes using Clover.

I know it has been cited ad nauseum around here, but the best deal around is Costco Dutch Gold Pure Clover Honey at ~$1.40/lb in a 5 lb lot (~$6.85). I assume Dutch Gold is a 'good' brand.

That's cheaper than Dutch Gold has on their Website!

The only non-mail order source of Buckwheat Honey I found locally was Whole Foods at a whopping $4.69/lb

Mailorder isn't much better for Buckwheat even when shipping doesn't get factored in. (Dutch Gold Buckwheat Honey is 21.60/5 lb BEFORE shipping).

DeltOgre
08-30-2006, 08:41 AM
I got some buckwheat out here for $2.50/lb, in 12 lb. lots. Of course, that was with no shipping. Deer Creek Honey. I think they have better prices at larger amounts, though, so maybe give them a call. The guy's name is Lee Dunham. If you approach it like you are a fellow beekeeper, he may even tell you where he got the buckwheat, as I know for a fact that he doesn't "grow it" (I have no idea what you guys call it!) on his own...

At any rate, it's pretty darned good.

Oskaar
08-30-2006, 08:53 AM
Seems to me like you guys are getting boned on pricing.

I'm not paying much more than $1.50 on average per pound of Orange Blossom, Sage, Macadamia Nut, Buckwheat, Mesquite, etc. I have purchased some speciality honeys that were more expensive but even at that rate the most I've paid is $2.50/lb and we're talking impossible to get Meadowfoam honey.

I'd really look around, or band together and start calling the same honey vendor as a group to see if you can get better pricing if you can get a block of people all to buy from the same vendor. I get a break on pricing because of the referrals I send to certain places, as well as the fact that I buy a lot of honey from these folks.

It pays to shop around almost daily if you can. That's what I do and I find some pretty awesome deals. My last bucket of Western Buckwheat cost me $66 for a five gallon bucket. That's like $1.10/lb for honey that I consider to be excellent quality honey.

Hope that helps,

Oskaar

The Honey Farmer
08-30-2006, 09:23 AM
I sell mine for $4.00 lb. Folks around here want local wild flower honey and they know that I strain and not filter it and I never heat it. Great for their allergies! I say it all depends on your market.
Hey Dahole, welcome to gotmead. Now were do you live that you can pull that much honey with just six colonies? I think I wanna move there! lol
Oskaar, Cal. has alot of Honey Brokers that buy bulk at their price and man o man do they keep the price down. I know one guy in Palo Cedro that pulls a million plus pounds a year, and sells for what the broker offers. That way he dosn't have to try and peddle it or haul it himself.
Bee cool, Dennis

Angus
08-30-2006, 10:18 AM
In Wisconsin, anything from $1.20 up $2.00 per lb. bulk.

Depending on vendor, type, whether I bring my own container etc.

Angus

kace069
08-30-2006, 11:14 AM
The honey broker here in Michigan is only paying $0.98/lb which I guess is pretty good last year was only $0.83/lb. I wouldn't consider 5# a bulk sale though. I would think to not even bother calling it bulk until people start buying 2 gallons at a time and then start coming down on the price. I say for all the stings you get over the course of the season sell it at what ever the local market price is. Bottling is a chore and if someone is going to come get it in bulk then give them a deal. Especially if they come with their own containers. One of the local beekeepers near me sells it for $2/lb no matter how much you buy. Needless to say I had only bought honey from him once.

insanity
08-30-2006, 01:43 PM
Welcome to Gotmead.

My local honey people want a heavy premium for their honey. And their level of work and lack of volume may indeed justify their asking price. Plus – as long as the tourists pay for the fancy label = they have a market. I try to remember that they get to buy all those little containers, fill them, clean-up, label them, travel into town, stand at tents, advertise, etc.

So was the proposal for bulk quantity honey (usually, say at least 5 gal) at little bottle prices? Or for little bottles of honey at bulk prices? I would think if you have already bottled the honey in little bottles, your market price would be higher and you’d let that consumer find a cheaper source.

Good Luck!

Edit: I was just looking at a website that offered honey sales. They were selling honey in 2 oz, 4 oz, 1 lb, 5lb, etc containers. From the prices, the only conclusion I can make is that as the container gets smaller, they are no longer selling the honey but rather just reselling jars.

Little Mick
08-30-2006, 08:24 PM
Honey Heads,
In Tacoma, WA I buy my fireweed and wildberry honey at $1.95/lb. No fancy label just white buckets poured while I watch. But then I get mine from my local home brew shop and have never tried to price from anywhere else.

I tend to agree with others that $3.00 seems akin to gouging but that is from the viewpoint of a consumer not a vendor. I am sure it is all relative to where you are looking from.

The Mick

Johnnybladers
08-30-2006, 08:35 PM
The local apiary (Keeney and Ziegler in Bethel Pa)gets between 1.58-2.05 per lb in 60# pails and 2.25-2.75 per 1 lb jars according to my last list. I wonder if Oskaar might share some of his suppliers names and contact info, especially for the meadowfoam? Is meadowfoam really that special? Unfortunately I've never been able to try any. They carry wildflower, clover, OB, blueberry blossom, gallberry blossom, alfalfa and buckwheat at the aforementioned apiary which is just across the interstate from me.
Jon

JayH
08-30-2006, 09:38 PM
Luckly about once a month I have to drive right by Millers Honey. www.MillersHoney.com note, there is also a www.MillerHoney.com that is a different website.

Their prices are $1.00 / lb for Wildflower, $1.20 / lb for Sage, Buckwheat or Clover and $1.40 for organic Orange Blossom. The Orange Blossom went up this year due to an exceptionally bad crop. These are all on 5 gallon buckets.


Cheers
Jay

DeltOgre
08-31-2006, 12:40 PM
From another thread... NOT MY WORDS:

"To purchase the three and a half gallons of moderate to average quality honey that it would take for me to make a 12 gallon batch of JAO would cost about $350, including shipping."

Sounds like $8/lb. or so should be right in there...

The sarcasm's so thick, I could cut it with a knife... I know I've been paying too much, but COME ON.

Little Mick
08-31-2006, 07:41 PM
The sarcasm's so thick, I could cut it with a knife... I know I've been paying too much, but COME ON.


Now this confuses me.

Dahole
08-31-2006, 11:53 PM
I sell mine for $4.00 lb. Folks around here want local wild flower honey and they know that I strain and not filter it and I never heat it. Great for their allergies! I say it all depends on your market.
Hey Dahole, welcome to gotmead. Now were do you live that you can pull that much honey with just six colonies? I think I wanna move there! lol
Oskaar, Cal. has alot of Honey Brokers that buy bulk at their price and man o man do they keep the price down.


I do the same with mine and that helps me get the $4.00lb. I am in WI and this is a bumper crop. I am expecting to pull off another 200-300 in early sept for a total of about 600 - 700 lbs. Never had a year like this, but this is the first year I didn't have a hive swarm on me.

I would caution that a fair amount of the bulk honey can come from China or Brazil. The China honey has been found to contain things other then pure honey like corn syrup. Not all of it, but some mind you.

After reading the feedback from everyone I have decided that I am going to stick with my current price and not sell it for less. (I need to have some way of paying for new bees when I lose them all to the damn mites. I refuse to use anything other then natural methods to control them.)

Little Mick While you might think my price is gouging keep in mind that all farming is hard work and bees are no exception. While I am making a profit it is not huge since I do seem to use more then the average person. :cheers:

kace069
09-01-2006, 12:36 AM
Dahole,
From my understanding China got caught with "dirty honey" I took this as honey with medication in it, or like you said honey cut with corn syrup. Either way I guess that, at the time pushed the bulk prices up to about 1.50/lb. Because they were prevented from exporting honey here. After their probationary period and they started exporting honey here it pushed down the honey prices domesticaly.

I will have to say farming in any sense of the word is a role of the dice every year. I am glad that I do not have to make my living keeping bees. I think I would pull what little hair left in my head out. Plus like any farmer I think local economy dictates prices. If people are paying $4/lb for bottled honey let them pay. After all the things that cut into the price of a 1lb jar. At $4/lb you may be making what $.50? $1 if your lucky. Unless of course you ar producing a 100,000#/year, then sheer volume comes into play.

I may say that I get my honey for free, but after you take into account the price of just getting into this and then the work and time and a couple of hundred beestings. It is going to be a few years before I personally see a return on my investment.
And I still want to expand. Guess I am a glutton for punishment. But I love my girls!



BTW, shouldn't a quart at $3/lb= $9?

mminuet
09-01-2006, 09:42 AM
From another thread... NOT MY WORDS:

"To purchase the three and a half gallons of moderate to average quality honey that it would take for me to make a 12 gallon batch of JAO would cost about $350, including shipping."

Sounds like $8/lb. or so should be right in there...

The sarcasm's so thick, I could cut it with a knife... I know I've been paying too much, but COME ON.


There you go - trying to pee on my parade again. I really wish you'd stop, dude. :pottytrain2:

The $8 per lb affords me the ability to have a UPS truck make a stop at my favorite apiaries on the other side of the nation and bring to me honey of a known and reliable quality. Shipping is expensive, but paying it means that I get to choose my honey from people with their noses in hives instead of those with their noses in ledger books. It is a luxury that I hope you are also someday afforded, despite the fact that 90% of your posts leave me upset.

Dahole
09-01-2006, 12:29 PM
I may say that I get my honey for free, but after you take into account the price of just getting into this and then the work and time and a couple of hundred beestings. It is going to be a few years before I personally see a return on my investment.
And I still want to expand. Guess I am a glutton for punishment. But I love my girls!

BTW, shouldn't a quart at $3/lb= $9?


I do love my girls to...and as they say nothing is free :icon_salut:

Yes if you get $3lb a quart should cost $9. I sell mine for $12 per quart. 3lbs per quart and $4 X 3 lbs is $12. Did I mess my math up somewhere?

insanity
09-01-2006, 12:37 PM
In the past, I've spent more than $8/lb. Geographical differences increase my shipping costs as well. I'll admit that I'm jealous that others can find really good honeys consistently at prices well under $2.50/lb as well. I think that will happen as I move from buying 1 gallon containers and buy more in 5 gallon containers.

I think we all want to make good meads and if we can achieve that without going broke - I'm all for it.

And props to the beekeepers - you're efforts are appreciated.
If I can make life easier on the beekeeper or honey co-op by bringing my own container in for filling, etc - I'm willing! :cheers:

Little Mick
09-01-2006, 11:47 PM
This topic sure has sparked debate! I'm not sure if there would be enough or *any* actual difference in quality to warrant $8.00 a pound. Unless I was living in the arctic circle or orbiting the earth. Maybe in an underwater bio-lab or some such. MMinuet, which apiery do you get your honey from and what qualities do they or their honey have to inspire such consumer loyalty?

I am shocked to hear that there are people out there who would cut with corn syrup. It baffles me.

Overall I suppose I took for granted having access to a steady supply of good, affordable honey.

Dahole
09-04-2006, 08:32 PM
This topic sure has sparked debate! ...

I am shocked to hear that there are people out there who would cut with corn syrup. It baffles me.

Yes it has sparked a debate. Thats not a bad thing as long as nobody gets mad about it :drunken_smilie:

Hey LM be sure to understand that as far as I know there has not been a case of a U.S. supplier cutting their honey with corn syrup. Ony China and debate about Brazil that has to my knowledge never been confirmed.

Honey like any other product can be priced expensive or cheap depending. Hell some beer costs .50 a bottle while other stuff costs $3 a bottle. The 3 dollar bottle may be better to some, but the .50 bottle may be better to others. It just depends on what you like and what you want to do with it.

For example I only use one chemical on my hives (Fumagilin-b)and I only use it in the fall after my harvest or in early spring at least a month before the first spring flow. It is an antibiotic that combats Nosema disease.

Doing this helps me produce a different product, but that comes at a price since I tend to lose more hives to mites then most might so my costs are higher.

I never heat filter mine. I only strain it let, it sit, scrape the wax off the top, and bottle. This gives me a raw product that helps with the price.

Others may use checkmite or XXX for the mites, this for that and that for this, then heat and preasure filter it. That is not wrong, it is just different and thus they may be able to price their honey different, and when they do I don't get the least bit mad that they are selling theirs for less then me. Where I get mad is when the imported stuff is dumped on the market in the U.S. and Canada. :cheers:

OSKAAR and anyone else in Cal should note that they are spoiled when it comes to honey prices. That is one area where a large number of bee keepers actually get paid a huge amount of $ for polination. This helps reduce their cost and helps keep the price down a bit.

kace069
09-04-2006, 10:13 PM
Hey Dahole where are you at? I may havemissed it somewhere. I know Honey farmer has commented on drought conditions this year and my mentor told me today that some of his connections father west in the country are facing the same problems. That it may even push honey prices up because of a poor season.
I got a good summer season but for the most part honey production has fell of in my area. Although we have had good rains the weather still isn't cooperating. In fact I think I will be pulling all my supers this weekend.

Dahole
09-04-2006, 11:18 PM
Winchester WI

Yes it was very dry here also.

Little Mick
09-05-2006, 05:50 AM
Dahole,
I did understand that it was China/Brazil that had been mentioned and I am sure it was a very small portion. It just struck me as odd. From a keepers point of view what causes a 'drought'? You do mean honey drought right?

Also it is good of you to keep your operation natural, although I don't claim to know what the difference in end product would be.

Pewter_of_Deodar
09-05-2006, 09:16 AM
Winchester WI

Yes it was very dry here also.

I just started a Peasant Pyment with a wildflower honey purchased from a member of the SCA here in Iowa ($25 per gallon). It's interesting that Wisconsin is having a drought when this individual from North Central Iowa said it was a really good year for them. But I hope next year is better for everyone that had problems this year...

Pewter

Dahole
09-05-2006, 08:14 PM
When I say drought I was talking about the weather not the honey crop. What is odd is that we had drought year so I would have expected the honey crop to be down since the honey flow should have been reduced by the drought. For me I had a banner year. Very odd.

kace069
09-06-2006, 02:45 AM
Little Mick,
To answer your question about keeping all natural.
No it will have no effect on the end product unless the keeper isn't taking honey off before or when appropriate for the treatments you give the bees.
It boils down to personal prefrence and philosphy. Just like some meadmakers on the board perfer an all natural approach versus the addition of man made chemicals.

I do use some chemicals but try to use them lightly. For instance I gave my bees no spring treatments. Nosema, from what I know is not a big concern in my area. But Varroa mites are a big issue. So is foul brood to some degree. Others have to deal with Small Hive beetles. Some have to deal with chalkbrood. Some of these problems have to do with where you live. Mites are a common problem for all.

I do plan on making some sort of treatment for the Fall. I will determine what I will do after I pull my supers and give my girls a good examination. I would perfer to go all natural. But it is almost impossible nowadays. Especially if you want to avoid buying bees in the spring. Not to say that it can't be done. I defenitely admire anyone who does not use chemicals for their operations. I am lucky enough to be in a position to get treatments for mine cheap and would perfer to see my girls have the best chance to overwinter.

But this boils down to personal preference with no difference in the end product but possibly how much of it there will be.

With that said I would defenitly not try to argue that either method is better than the other. What works for one person may not work for another.

Hope this gives you some insight, I'm sure others will chime in with their opinions for what has and hasn't worked.

Little Mick
09-06-2006, 04:14 AM
Well I want to thank you all for answering my questions! Keeping bees is very interesting to me and is becoming more so. Whether small farm or large, whether all natural or cutting edge science you all make mead possible. My hat off to you guys for enduring the sting.

beeboy
09-06-2006, 10:36 AM
Just thought I'd pass on some of the honey prices that are listed in the August Bee Culture. Every month they publish a chart showing bulk and bottled price averages in 12 different regions of the US.
Packaging Region Highest Region lowest Wholesale/Retail
60# light S.Mid $135.00 Great $90.29 Retail
West Lakes
60# amber S.Mid $135.00 Great $83.75 Retail
West Lakes
2# Glass/ Central $7.75 N.Mid $5.65 Retail Shelf
Plastic US West Price
5# Glass/ Central $15.99 Northern $12.46 Retail Shelf
Plastic US New Eng. Price

The prices are just the highs and lows shown on the chart and really don't reflect any specific honey but it will give everybody an idea of the price range across the US.
Now just for a laugh lets see how much my honey crop cost me this year since all I needed were the bees and a little equipment.
3 packages of bees - $200.00
2 Queens for older - $32.00
Hive
2 cases 24 oz - $35.00
plastic bottles
Total - $267.00
Honey Produced - 130 lbs
Cost per pound - $2.05
Looks like I need to charge more than $3.00 per 24 oz bottle to make any money at all.
Oh yea, stings per pound of honey
Only had about 10 stings this year(love my smoker) so that figures to 13 pounds per sting ;D.
Been pulling off the extra supers and will try Grapefruit leaves in the smoker as a mite treatment this year. Will let everybody know how it works out.
Just checked the price chart and it is a little confused, oops, sorry.

BeeFolks
10-10-2006, 11:37 PM
We offer our honey at $6.50/pound, with discounts for quantity purchases. Then again, we often have 15+ varietal honeys in one spot, and you can get as much or as little as you want and pay for shipping only once. A local beekeeper can sell for less than us, but they don't have the variety we offer. Plus, many times a small beekeeper will sell at a loss, just because he doesn't know what to do with 200# of honey.

The prices mentioned in the journals reflect wholesale prices to largescale bakeries and the such. Think Sunbeam, McDonalds, that sort of thing. Don't know about you guys, but even after selling 13,000 pounds of honey last year, even WE don't get that rate!

When the Chinese honey was found with antibiotics in it, literally thousands of tons of honey had to be trashed. In Europe, the antibiotic that was used is banned in foodstuffs. The US is more lax, but followed suit the following year after Chinese honey was found to be contaminated in the US.

To my knowledge, Brazil has not had problems with contamination. However, South America tends to dump their honey on the US for less than what US beekeepers can afford to sell for. Laws were enacted within the last year to levy higher tariffs on imported honey, to try to help protect US beekeepers. Unfortunately, it does not seem to be enough. I know of several pollination services that have folded because they cannot get a high enough price for their honey. They are not even covering the price of the gas required for the trucks and equipment.... This will eventually affect US crops, too, as bees for pollination become harder to find.

We are trying to keep away from chemical treatments in our hives, and stick with essential oil treatments. So far, we have a few hives that seem to be mite resistant, and we keep trying to expand them each year. Definitely makes our own beekeeping more expensive, and reduces the amount of honey that we get from our hives (due to weaker bees, replacement of hives killed by mites, etc.).

Oskaar
10-11-2006, 12:58 AM
Hey Lori,

Great information! I'm glad you joined the boards and are actively posting. It's an education for those of us who are ignorant of the beekeeping field!

Thanks again,

Oskaar

WoodstockDoug
10-12-2006, 01:31 AM
I bought my 5 gallon bucket of clover honey two weeks ago for $108, which, if it is 60 pounds, works out to $1.80 a pound. My local health food co-op sells it in bulk out of a big drum for $2.25 a pound (I think; I haven't priced it in a few months).

WoodstockDoug
10-13-2006, 02:18 AM
I should amend my comment to include the fact that I bought my honey from a vendor at the Saugerties Garlic Festival. There were a LOT of honey vendors there this year. I don't know if the price of honey would have been cheaper outside of the festival, but I get the impression that it wouldn't.

Justin
11-28-2006, 08:53 PM
I recently hooked up with the local beekeeper. I tried my first 1 gallon batch on store bought honey and now know what a big no no that is. I first bought 2 gallons in quart jars. It's wildflower honey and he charged me $25 a gallon. I went back last night for a 3 gallon purchase and of course at $25 a lb. it was $75. It wasn't until after I got there that he told me if I bring my own 5 gallon bucket he'll fill it for $60 dollars! Before I go back again I'll be stopping by the brew shop to pick up one of those pails with a spout.

ucflumberjack
11-28-2006, 09:10 PM
i just got about 32 pounds of honey from fruitwood orchards(mailorder) for $122(not including shipping), about 3.80 a pound. i got kinda shafted but the only local guy around here only sells dark wildflower and i was lookin for some cranberry honey(which doesnt taste much like cranberries) and i figured i would just order it all at once..... the local guy sells it for $25 a gallon(the dark wf). i think ill be making my next few batches from darK wildflower honey lol..... show mead here i come!!!!

insanity
11-28-2006, 11:28 PM
i just got about 32 pounds of honey from fruitwood orchards(mailorder) for $122(not including shipping), about 3.80 a pound. i got kinda shafted but the only local guy around here only sells dark wildflower and i was lookin for some cranberry honey(which doesnt taste much like cranberries) and i figured i would just order it all at once..... the local guy sells it for $25 a gallon(the dark wf). i think ill be making my next few batches from darK wildflower honey lol..... show mead here i come!!!!


In you post, you state "i got kinda shafted". Did fruitwood orchards shaft you? Or was it the local guy? Please ellaborate! I'm of the opinion that potentially bad feedback (allegations) be well substantiated.

Did they not send the honey? Did it arrive damaged or different than what you sampled? Do you think the honey wasn't worth the price?

I've bought a lot of honeys and really don't feel shafted in my deals. I've bought some pretty good honeys and have also bought some that I did not like. I've paid more per gallon than you at times and sometimes less. Did your honey source represent it to taste like cranberries? Was it blended with something else? Was it watered down and/or partially fermented ... etc!

CyberPope
11-29-2006, 09:00 AM
I have purchased 15# of Buckwheat in the past from Fruitwood and was pleased with the result. When I bought it though it was about $7 cheaper per 5# jar and that was only 6 months ago.

Peace

ucflumberjack
11-29-2006, 09:50 PM
i just thought it would be more tart. i just dont taste any tartness to it at all. my original plan was to make a show mead out of it but now i kinda have to throw in some cranberries to get the desired level of tartness.....

i didnt get shafted at all though. i just kinda felt like it after reading prices from other people it made me feel like i paid to much.

they were good though, they shipped promptly, provided tracking numbers, and everything was carefully packed. i would encourage anyone else to buy from them, that is unless of course you have a cheaper source.

im actually impressed with the alfalfa i got, i like the flavor its kind of got a buttery aftertaste...

im going to get a hold of come of that local wf after christmas or maybe before(am savin for keg system), so that i can avoid shipping costs. i might be using that alot for a while lol...

CyberPope
11-30-2006, 07:26 AM
im actually impressed with the alfalfa i got, i like the flavor its kind of got a buttery aftertaste...


Cool! I'm bidding on a gallon of Alfalfa myself on ebay through abigailshoney so if all goes well I should have some alfalfa myself to try out.

Rhianni
11-30-2006, 06:08 PM
I searched online and hit farmers markets for fresh local honey. To be honest the best price I found was at Whole Foods. $2.29 / lb. Local colorado honey in a large 5+ gallon drum on tap. Wildflower, high altitude and a california orange blossum.

I would prefer to buy from a small or truly local source. But the ones I found were really high. Per lb it doesnt seem like much but if the end result is between $40 - $75+ per batch for just the honey it can add up.

Dahole
12-01-2006, 03:46 AM
Yes it does add up. Rhianni. As I mentioned above I get $12 per quart for mine so for the the last batch I just put together it cost me $84 for the honey. Now granted I paid my honey fund the money but your point is still valid.

That said sometimes a $3 bottle of wine tastes like a $3 bottle of wine. I say up your odds that you are not going to get a $3 bottle of wine by using only the best bits.

BeeFolks
06-06-2007, 11:19 PM
FYI - We are starting to see the price of honey go up. Between CCD and extreme weather fluctuations in some parts of the country, our suppliers have raised prices, some as much as double last year's price.

So far, we have been able to offset most of the average increase by larger bulk purchases. We are trying to keep prices as low as possible as long as possible. However, we are looking at potentially needing to raise our own prices by September...