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View Full Version : Tannin Galalcool?????



kace069
10-02-2006, 01:15 AM
Not a newbee here but figured this was a good place to put this thread. I have never heard of tannin galacool. Am I out of the loop? I just buy tannin. I have never even seen this product offered anywhere. What am I missing?
Thanks,
Kace, the last to know.

WRATHWILDE
10-02-2006, 01:39 AM
Here's the Link to the product at MoreWine... Tannin Galalcool. (http://morewinemaking.com/product.html?product_id=6141)

A brief description...
Tannin Galalcool was specifically developed for addition to white wines because it is colorless. It is an anti-oxidant and helps protect against oxidation and browning. From a sensory view it contributes to a soft, full mouthfeel and will impart a very slight perception of sweetness without contributing any sugars. Use 2 to 5 grams per gallon. We sell it sized for 6 gallon carboys and 60 gallon barrels at a rate of 2 grams per gallon.

Cheers,
Wrathwilde

Lugh
10-02-2006, 01:43 AM
Here's partial Material Safety Data Sheet info:

1 - CHEMICAL PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION AND COMPANY IDENTIFIACTION.
Product names : TANIN GALALCOOL - TANIN VR - TANIN VR Supra - TANIN VR Supra NF- TANIN
GALALCOOL - TANIN GALACOOL SP - QUERTANIN - TANíCOR - TANíCOR Grand Cru - TANIN PLUS -
BIOTAN - QUERTANIN EFFERVESCENT. Product use : winemaking
Supplier :
LAFFORT OENOLOGIE - B.P. 17
33 015 BORDEAUX CEDEX
Tel: 33.(0)5.56.86.53.04 Fax: 33.(0)5.56.86.30.50
Distributed by :
Local Emergency contact number :
2 - COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS.
Substance/preparation of : Atomized extract of wood.
Chemical name : Tannin.
CAS number : 1401-55-4
EINECS number : 295-630-8


It's wood pulp. Or rather, bark. My guess is it is not much different from the regular, non-grape tannin most places sell, unless it's made from some special source wood.

Edit: Found this note on TANIN GALALCOOL on the Scottlab web site: Tanin Galalcool is derived from the gall nut of oak trees. It is referred to as a "white fluffy tannin" due to the color and nature of the product. It was specifically developed for addition to white wines because it is colorless. Tanin Galalcool is recommended for use on grapes that have Botrytis, other molds, or rot. It inhibits laccase activity, prevents oxidation and protects the must against browning. This tannin may be used in red wines when very subtle changes are desired.

kace069
10-02-2006, 01:53 AM
Wow thanks for the info guys!
So since I have just learned about this compound tonight from some other posts.
Is there an advantage to this product over regular grape tannin other than color contribution, which I haven't noticed from my own expereince.

I also noticed something about bark tannin. I recently bought another tannin which doesn't label itself as grape tannin which may come from bark of soemthing like you all said.
I hadn't realized I needed to question where the tannin comes from, much like I haven't questioned what kind of fish isinglass comes from...lol. I just thought tannin came from grape skins.

As for bark I only know the difference in which cinnamon is derived from.

Guess I am way out of the loop.
Thanks again guys!

Oskaar
10-02-2006, 01:57 AM
Tannin galalcool is actually nicknamed "White Fluffy Tannin" and is a bit rust colored when re-hydrated per instructions from the manufacturer. It is indeed an Oak tannin derivative, but it is a product of the Oak Gall nut from the Oak tree.

It softens the mid-palate on dry white wines, and I've been using it in my dry mead batches now for the last couple of years. It can be very strong if used in excess quantity, and for mead it is my experience that adding it at the recommended level will yield a nice dry mead, but it will take time for that oakey tannin to mellow out. I use it at 1/3-1/2 of the recommended dosage normally and sometimes if I need more I'll supplement with grape tannin at the end.

If you are emulating barrel fermentation by adding oak to your primary then I would suggest that when adding tannin galalcool you go with the 1/3 addition rather than 1/2 normal dosage. I like a lot of astringency in my dry meads and wines so I'm not shy about laying on the wood and the tannin, but other folks who aren't big fans of that level would be better served by lower doses.

Hope that helps,

Oskaar

Lugh
10-02-2006, 02:05 AM
Well, I guess it depends on your skills and what you want the final taste to be. Honestly, I probably couldn't tell the difference between all the different tannins unless it was a side by side taste test. And even then my palate probably isn't attuned to really small subtleties of flavor changes.

Scottlabs has different recomendations for use based on type:
http://www.scottlab.com/products/fermentation/tannins.asp
TANIN VR SUPRA = chestnut
TANIN VR SUPRA NF = oak
BIOTAN = grape
TAN'COR = oak
QUERTANIN = Limousin oak
TANIN PLUS = American oak
TANIN GALALCOOL = Gall Nut from oak

WRATHWILDE
10-02-2006, 02:11 AM
Hey Oskaar,

The recommended dose according to MoreWine is 2 to 5 grams per gallon, their individual pack is 12 grams for a 6 gallon batch, of which I used about 10 grams, was this more than You would have used? If max is at 5 grams 30 and I used 10 then I'm sitting about 1/3rd which is cool, if you consider 2 grams the recommended dosage then I way over shot where I wanted to be. What do you think?

Wrathwilde

ucflumberjack
07-23-2007, 09:47 PM
i know this is old but........ i finally got some of this stuff. im prolly not gonna use it for a while, but was wondering the same thing.

1/3 of 2 grams per gallon = 12 grams per 6 gallons / 3 = 4 grams for 6 gallons
or
1/3 of 5 grams per gallon = 30 grams per 6 gallons / 3 = 10 grams for 6 gallons

?