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entipy
11-01-2006, 12:30 PM
I went to my local liquor store and asked what the largest size glass container he got stuff in was, and he told me it's 3 liters. Seeing as how there are 3.785 liters to a gallon (according to my chemist friend), does anyone see where there would be a problem using the 3 liter container for secondary fermentation? I mean, it's less than a gallon, but after you rack from your primary fermenter, don't you have to add back some liquid, anyway? (This would be awesome for us because we could probably get all we wanted for free.)

Which leads me to another question. Should you always keep the liquid level as full as possible in whichever given container?

Thanks!
Jules

akueck
11-01-2006, 04:09 PM
1. You could always use a 3L as a primary as well, if you don't lose a liter in transit. Or make several gallons in a larger container (plastic buckets are cheap and often come with spigots) and then transfer to several 3L containers for secondary/bulk aging. I usually top up my gallons after a few days to a week--once the activity is slower and there are less bubbles. This way I usually end up with about 110-120 fl oz of mead after transfer (128 fl oz in a gallon). Of course, you don't have to top up and/or you can drink the "extra".

2. If your mead is not actively fermenting (which is when it produces lots of CO2), it should be kept in a container such that head space (air above the liquid) is minimized. This goes for most secondary fermentations, bulk aging, bottling, etc. If you have a way to inject CO2, N2, Ar, etc into headspace (to drive off oxygen), this is less of an issue. Basically, too much oxygen is bad for mead that is done fermenting (and too much can be a pretty small amount). But for primary fermentations, don't fill to the top! You'll end up with some sticky explosives and fragrant ceiling decorations.

JamesP
11-01-2006, 06:53 PM
Use a gallon primary, then rack to the 3L carboy when you rack off the yeast and stuff in the bottom, and then you will have a little bit left over for topping-up later (or for sampling :drunken_smilie: ).

entipy
11-02-2006, 09:37 AM
Very cool! Thanks so much. :)