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sharpie
04-23-2007, 10:07 PM
I have a bit of a problem. We have a colony of honey beeís living in a tree in my parentís front yard. The tree needs to come down because itís dieing and hollow in some spots. Thatís probably why the bees are there. Should we just spray the nest with raid and cut it down or is there some one who would want to get these bees. My mom thought I we should look into it before we cut it down. I donít know anything about honey beeís besides they sting and they make honey that I use to make mead. I live in upper Ohio just in case someone knows a place I could call off hand. I donít think anyone would want to do it myself itís pretty high up and close to the road.

Dan McFeeley
04-24-2007, 08:41 AM
I have a bit of a problem. We have a colony of honey beeís living in a tree in my parentís front yard. The tree needs to come down because itís dieing and hollow in some spots. Thatís probably why the bees are there. Should we just raid the nest and cut it down or is there some one who would want to get these bees. My mom thought I we should look into it before we cut it down. I donít know anything about honey beeís besides they sting and they make honey that I use to make mead. I live in upper Ohio just in case someone knows a place I could call off hand. I donít think anyone would want to do it myself itís pretty high up and close to the road.

Are you sure these are honey bees? If they are, that's really cool! Feral honey bees in the USA have been devastated by the Varroa mite, and nearly vanished altogether. If these really are honey bees, they're very exceptional, having developed resistance to the Varroa mite. There have been scattered reports here and there of feral honeybees, really good news because it means that our
natural wildlife honeybee population is coming back from near extinction.

Check your local yellow pages, et. al., and get in
contact with a local beekeeping association. They
can help you move the nest. These honey bees are
really unique, and need to be preserved!

Scadsobees
04-24-2007, 11:09 AM
http://www.ebeehoney.com/zOH.html
http://www.honeyrunapiaries.com/bee_links-Ohio-352.phtml

These are a couple sites that you can try for references. Most exterminators will do exactly as they advertise...exterminate them, but there are some more thoughtful ones out there. I think that raiding it yourself would be a little more of an adventure than you might think. It is a ton of work to take them out, and there would be a lot of flying bees if you tried it. But if you want to get some bee equipment it could be an exciting start to an expensive but rewarding hobby!!! :)

Rick

Dan McFeeley
04-24-2007, 12:54 PM
http://www.ebeehoney.com/zOH.html
http://www.honeyrunapiaries.com/bee_links-Ohio-352.phtml

These are a couple sites that you can try for references. Most exterminators will do exactly as they advertise...exterminate them, but there are some more thoughtful ones out there. I think that raiding it yourself would be a little more of an adventure than you might think. It is a ton of work to take them out, and there would be a lot of flying bees if you tried it. But if you want to get some bee equipment it could be an exciting start to an expensive but rewarding hobby!!! :)

Rick


Oh my word, yes! Check these out -- if these are truly honeybees, you're onto something unique. Varroa resistant hooneybees are *extremely* important. Don't let a careless pest controler exterminate them. Check out the other threads on this forum -- honeybees that are surviving in the wild are really really important. A good beekeeper makes a practice of capturing feral honeybee swarms and transferring them to a hive -- it's how things were in the past, when honeybees in the wild were common.

If these are honeybees, don't let them go!

David Baldwin
04-24-2007, 02:11 PM
Sharpie,

Where in Northern Ohio are you?

I'm trying to figure out if I can possibly get there or if it's even feasible for me to capture them.

I'm short a colony right now, and would love the challenge.


David

wolf_tracker
04-24-2007, 04:27 PM
:wave:

Found this link:

http://tinyurl.com/3xtmsq

Hopefully there is a bee wrangler in your area

Pls let me know if you find one.

:cheers:
Wolf

sharpie
04-24-2007, 09:48 PM
Well my Grandparents use to own beeís before my time so my mom knows about them and told me there definitely honey beeís. When I said raid them I meant use the bug killer ďRaidĒ on them :evil4:. I had no idea they were rare but now that I know Iím not going to kill them :angel10:. My mom likes them because her garden is right by the tree and she likes honey bees. She would rather they just live there but the treeís hollow and in danger of falling on our house. She said that it would have to be dune in early summer otherwise they cant make enough honey in there new home to survive the winter. There coming out of several holes in the tree so Iím guessing threes a good number of them. Iím hoping they just decide to move but if they donít I guess Iíll have to call someone.

PS: Someone asked ware I live. Iím about 30 minutes east of Cleveland right on the lake by Painesville.

kace069
04-25-2007, 03:46 AM
I'm sorry to say that you have limited options except for some overly enthuisastic hobbiest beekeepers to come to your resuce. (Which would be me if you weren't so far away) Especially if they are up there high. It is possible that you can drop the tree and the bees survive the fall which would make them much easier to get at.

It would be a shame to see this feral hive die off.

My only other idea, which would require a beekeepr to assist you, unless you want to take this hobby up too, is to put a bait hive out. You won't be able to coax the whole colony out, but it is early spring. If the colony is in good health they should be preparing to swarm in the next month or so. With a good bait hive the swarm may take up residence in it. Or you can just catch the swarm, BTW none of which I have experience with. The swarm should contatin the current queen, the one producing geneticly superior bees to deal with all the problems a feral hive has to face with out the aid of a beekeeper.

IF the colony swarms and you can catch it, you could, in theroy of course, then drop the tree. Once the inside of the colony is left exposed and queenless, at which point they will be after the swarm. The remaing bees could/should find the old queen in her new home and join that colony in your bait hive. All theroy of course, bees have a mind of their own and don't always follow the rules. This would all require good timing. Besides all the IF's involved.

In the end not an easy undertaking and someone is going to suffer a bee sting or 80.

Once the dandelions start to come up (just saw my first ones of the year today) the bees will probably swarm shortly after. Could be days could be weeks. I would expect by the middle of May.

On second thought though, this sounds like the kind of foolish plan only I could dream up and then try to carry out. ;D

sharpie
04-25-2007, 08:11 AM
Soooo youíre telling me Iím going to have two of these damn things to deal with now. I dread to think ware there going to chose to live next. We have 10 acres for them to go live on and I think even an old bee hive back in the woods. I hope they go some ware away from the house. Bee keeping soundís like a fun hobby but I really would only have the time in the summer to mess around with them. Iím pretty sure that baiting them out would be a little much for me unless itís just putting a hive out next to the tree.

Scadsobees
04-25-2007, 12:13 PM
Hi Sharpie!
I don't suggest trying anything without a somewhat experienced beekeeper around. To find one, you might be better off stopping by somewhere that has beehives or sells honey if you can find one. From my experience, most non-internet beeks are old men who love to talk and help.

First, if you want to try, start out by reading some of these, and perhaps some time one beemaster.com and beesource.com.
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=8938.msg56811#msg56811
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=8749.msg55363#msg55363

To trap, you need an existing hive. You wouldn't want to do this or a cutout without some experienced help.

To build a hive, first look at the plans here: http://beesource.com/plans/index.htm the 10 frame hive and the Dadant Style Frames are most common.

When they swarm, which they most likely have done every year that they've been there, they take the queen and leave. They go wherever they find a suitable home. In theory and often they will go to a swarm trap, but not gaurunteed. Probably they will leave altogather never to be seen again. The trap will not get the bees out.

Your theory could work, kace, but the catch is that they will be reluctant to leave any brood that they have, and will stay on the comb even though exposed. If you were to brush them all off the comb, take the exposed comb and brood away and left the hive there, then they would. If you could catch the swarm....

But right after a swarm (sometime late may, early june) would be the best time to deal with them regardless...the bee population is lowest and least aggressive.

Rick

David Baldwin
04-25-2007, 01:34 PM
Come on Kace, It's only about 330 miles from Grand Rapids...

...ROAD TRIP...


Sounds like a grand adventure!


David

kace069
04-25-2007, 01:37 PM
To bad you and I only live 200 miles or so apart.

beeboy
04-25-2007, 04:40 PM
It's too bad that the bees are so far up in the tree. If they were lower down you could block off the entrances with screening in the evening to contain them and then do the tree work over the next day or two. I'm guessing it is a big branch that they live in so just cutting it off and letting it fall wouldn't be any good, the impact would probably kill the colony or at least really piss them off. Can't think of any easy way to save the bees and drop the tree. Even setting up a trap hive would be tough because of the height and location of the branch. Are you going to be able to drop the tree in one piece or do you need to limb it before dropping the trunk? I'd try to find a beekeeper and see what he says about the whole thing. If you can't get the queen then the genetic makeup of the hive will be lost which would stink. Wish I was closer, I'd think about giving it a try, good luck

sharpie
04-25-2007, 07:56 PM
Thanks for the help. Itís a pretty big branch there in and I can get to the holes there coming out of but itís pretty much guaranteed Iím going to get stung a dozen or so times. We actually found out about them when we tried to have the city cut a few limbs off of it. I suppose we could cut just that branch off but I donít know how much of this tree is hollow. I also really donít know how big this hive is. Like I said before I know nothing about bees. Iím going to look around my area for a bee keeper. I live in the boon docks so Iím sure there has to be one around here.



It's too bad that the bees are so far up in the tree. If they were lower down you could block off the entrances with screening in the evening to contain them and then do the tree work over the next day or two. I'm guessing it is a big branch that they live in so just cutting it off and letting it fall wouldn't be any good, the impact would probably kill the colony or at least really piss them off. Can't think of any easy way to save the bees and drop the tree. Even setting up a trap hive would be tough because of the height and location of the branch. Are you going to be able to drop the tree in one piece or do you need to limb it before dropping the trunk? I'd try to find a beekeeper and see what he says about the whole thing. If you can't get the queen then the genetic makeup of the hive will be lost which would stink. Wish I was closer, I'd think about giving it a try, good luck

sharpie
04-25-2007, 08:17 PM
So why are these beeís so important? I know Iíve seen honey bees around my area before and at least one other nest over the years. Iíve never heard about there being a problem with wild honey bees before. I know there's a problem with bee keepers hive dieing off for some mysteries reason and wouldnít the yellow jackets and white faced hornets be affected by whateverís killing them. There are plenty of those things around thatís why I have a can of raid on hand at all times. It seems like it would be highly improbable that genetically superior bees (Whatever that is.) would decide to come live in my front yard. Then agene I should also point out that I live in Perry Ohio and if you didnít know were famous for our nurseries. We have highest number of then in one place in northeastern United States or something like that. So the abundance of flowering plants might be a factor. I actually live right across the street from a huge nursery. So combined with my moms over obsession with plants and her garden I might have a target painted on my house for bees. I should take some pictures and put them up.

kace069
04-26-2007, 01:34 AM
Yes some pics of your situation would be helpful.

There are a lot of reasons why these bees are special.
On the top of my list for them being so special is that they have developed some sort of resistance to varroa mites. Varroa mites are a pest that was imported to the US some time in the 80's. They live on the bees and suck the juice out of them leaving the bees weaker and shortening their life span. The mites reproduce by laying their eggs in cells with developing bee larva where they feed on the larva until they are big enough to attach themselves to adult bees, killing the larva in the process. All beekepers deal with them and through the use of chemicals, can control the mites so they are not so detremental. A colony left with no help will eventually die, usually in the winter.

The introduction of varroa mites devestated the feral bee population. Any feral colonies that can manage the mite problem has a disticnt adavantage over domesticated bees. All the bees in a colony come from one queen who passes on the genetics that helps the bees cope with the mites. Making them very special. One less problem for the bee keeper to deal with, there are many threats to bees health and now we have CCD to deal with.

What is it about the genetics that makes them able to deal with the mites? I'm not sure anyone really knows.

sharpie
04-27-2007, 08:06 PM
Well I have a few pics of the tree up. There a little dark but the limb closest to the camera is the one there in. I also took a pick to show how close to the road it is. If itís nicer tomorrow Iíll attempt to get a pic of the bees. Thereís also a few pics of my dog and my current mead.

http://s165.photobucket.com/albums/u70/sharpie443/

Dahole
07-20-2007, 12:55 AM
So what did you do with them? I hope you let them stay.

I have a tree that has a hive in also. It has had bee's in it for the last three years. I even caught a swam off of it this year!

jfet
10-01-2007, 10:44 PM
Hello,
You could probably try talking to Charlie at OhioHoney dot com. They might know someone that could help. They might know someone from perry that drops there hives for the nurseries. Any ways could be an option.
Chris

teljkon
10-26-2007, 02:16 AM
Nice looking mead is the tree completly dead it seems to lean twoard the raod Im curious what makes you think that its going to fall twoards the house is the rot greater near the house?