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Dorn
07-18-2007, 01:34 AM
Hi all, another newbee chiming in. :wave:Just thought I would say how much I appreciate the amount of knowledge available here on GotMead. I was really surprised to learn that home brewing was so accessible. Thanks for all the know-how.

Just started my first batch yesterday. Started with a Sima recipe I found here (thought I would begin with something nice and simple). Going at about a bubble every 15 seconds (not as much as I thought it would be). Not sure how it will turn out, but we shall see. :D

wayneb
07-18-2007, 10:38 AM
Welcome to Gotmead! Enjoy the hobby (and the results)!! :cheers:

sandman
07-18-2007, 02:05 PM
Hi Dorn, Welcome to GotMead and welcome to the forum!!!

There's no end of information on this site so you'll have plenty of opportrunities to try new recipes.
:cheers:

Dorn
07-21-2007, 01:51 AM
Well, the sima didn't work out well. The recipe calls for throwing in the entire lemon rind. Right after doing so, I search the net for more sima recipes and every other one says "Don't throw in the whole rind, just the yellow 'zest' if you throw the whole thing in it will be bitter and soapy tasting."

It was bitter and soapy tasting. :angry3:

So I tried another one with just the zest and some honey. Also started a batch of Joe's Ancient Orange (of course).

My question is this: if I find Chaucer's Mead to be a little on the sweet side and Chaucer's Raspberry Mead to be WAY too syrupy-sweet, will I like JAO? Should I let it age a little longer to dry it out?

wayneb
07-21-2007, 10:00 AM
Sorry, aging a mead that has finished fermenting will not make it drier. :sad11:

Only a more complete fermentation will do that. Joe's recipe calls for bread yeast, which has an inherently low alcohol tolerance, so you're gonna end up with a medium sweet to sweet mead as a result. If it turns out to be too sweet for you, then I recommend making up another batch but using Lalvin D-47 as the yeast instead. While you're at it, pick up some Fermaid-K, as you will need to supplement the nutrients available just from the must with some additional nitrogen sources to keep your yeast happy. Also be aware that since this is a wine yeast it may take a little longer to ferment to completion and since the result will be less sweet the other flavors will be more prominent, and will take longer to mellow through aging than the bread yeast version does, but you will end up with a much drier and more complex tasting mead. I've made a variant of Joe's with D-47, using Lalvin recommended nutrient additions, and it came out very nice.

ken_schramm
07-21-2007, 11:03 AM
Hi all, another newbee chiming in. :wave:Just thought I would say how much I appreciate the amount of knowledge available here on GotMead. I was really surprised to learn that home brewing was so accessible. Thanks for all the know-how.

Just started my first batch yesterday. Started with a Sima recipe I found here (thought I would begin with something nice and simple). Going at about a bubble every 15 seconds (not as much as I thought it would be). Not sure how it will turn out, but we shall see. :D


Welcome aboard. Something you can start doing that is fun and will have a beneficial affect on your mead is to begin buying small quantities of different varieties of honey and figuring out which ones you really like. There's a huge spectrum of flavors and aromas out there. You can also start snooping around to find sources at good prices. There is excellent honey to be found at reasonable prices for those willing to put in the time and effort to find it.

Thus begins a lifelong compulsion.....


Ken

Dorn
07-24-2007, 06:45 PM
Thanks for the suggestion Wayne, I might give that a try next time even if I like how this batch turns out. Variations on a theme, you know.

Ken: I used Orange Blossom Honey from the local brew shop on the JAO. I found a few online sources for honey. What are some of your favourites?