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The Mad Hatter
04-18-2008, 08:32 PM
Well, I have been lurking a bit now and have always wanted to make both beer and mead. I now have a gallon of JOA going. I hope it turns out good. I have never had mead before, so I am unsure as to what it will be like. I followed the recipe and started it thismorning. I need to get an airlock tomorrow, so I am suing a balloon until then. After about the third day, I will add a bit more water to the must to fill it up a bit more. Then I will wait the two months. My question is after the two months can you bottle it up rite then and age it, or do you still let it sit in the oranges and age that way?

Thanks TMH

fatbloke
04-19-2008, 02:40 PM
Well, I have been lurking a bit now and have always wanted to make both beer and mead. I now have a gallon of JOA going. I hope it turns out good. I have never had mead before, so I am unsure as to what it will be like. I followed the recipe and started it thismorning. I need to get an airlock tomorrow, so I am suing a balloon until then. After about the third day, I will add a bit more water to the must to fill it up a bit more. Then I will wait the two months. My question is after the two months can you bottle it up rite then and age it, or do you still let it sit in the oranges and age that way?

Thanks TMH

There seems to be more than one suggestion about this i.e. a bit like either using bread yeast (which is what I've used on the 3 gallons I've currently got on the go or wine yeast etc etc).

So the first one is that you can bottle it once the batch is clear i.e. syphon it off the debris/lees and then bottle (possibly filter it ???).

The other one is to leave it until the oranges or other fruit, if you used different from oranges, have sunk to the bottom of the fermenter.

The only reason why they float is that they will have absorbed/held some CO2, which will naturally come out of the must/fruit anyway. Though there are those who like to syphon it to a new, clean/sanitised/sterile container and then "whiz" it to de-gas it prior to bottling.

The choice is yours of course, or you could get a second batch on the go and do one, one way and the second batch another.

As for taste? If it's bread yeast based, then there'll probably be some residual sweetness there, if you used wine yeast, then it will have probably fermented to dry.

Taste? Well it would depend on whether it's turned out sweet or dry. Though that doesn't always guarantee that it will taste good immediately - for instance, the first batch I made, when it was first off the lees, was "Bbbblllllleeeeeeeaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrggggggggggggg ggghhhhhhhhhhhh"!(vvv strongly of cloves - initially it was over powering). So I just chucked it into a 1 gallon jar and put it under the stairs for bulk ageing.

After 6 or 9 months, when I was digging through what was there, a sample of it proved to be amazing. Rich, orangey, vv small hint of the spices. I was completely stunned with the changes in it over time. It was very good.

I believe that the idea of this recipe is so it can be ready too drink when it's cleared, but in my experience, it's very hard to tell whether that will actually be the case, because there are just too many variables that affect it.

All you can really do, is finish the batch too see how it comes out. If it's not to your taste straight away, then just rack it to a fresh jar (top it off with water to make sure air space is kept to a minimum) then just stopper it and leave it for as long as you can - periodic tests/tastes to see how it's getting along etc.

regards

fatbloke