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OOC92
06-25-2008, 10:55 PM
Is raw honey preferable for mead? What must one do to make it suitable for mead-making.

Oskaar
06-25-2008, 11:04 PM
Mix it with water, inoculate with properly rehydrated yeast, aerate twice daily, dose with nutrient at the end of the lag phase and at the 1/3 sugar break, rack when ferment is complete, rack again when clear, age, enjoy, repeat.

Hope that helps,

Oskaar

OOC92
06-25-2008, 11:08 PM
Uh wait isn't that the recipe for mead? I am looking to use a local raw honey to make versions of JAO my associate wants to experiment with. Advice? Adviceable?

CBiebel
06-25-2008, 11:29 PM
Uh wait isn't that the recipe for mead? I am looking to use a local raw honey to make versions of JAO my associate wants to experiment with. Advice? Adviceable?


Yeah, that was his point. Basically, there isn't anything you have to "do" with the raw honey. You just use it, preferably without heating it (heating it can remove some of the more delicate flavors and aromas of the honey).

Raw honey is preferable to any kind of processed honey because it would have more of the delicate flavors from the floral source.

Basically, the best advice for this is just "try it." You likely won't go wrong (although I wouldn't use a lot of the stronger honeys like Buckwheat for a JAO. Buckwheat is generally one of those honeys where "a little goes a long way").

wayneb
06-25-2008, 11:54 PM
Raw honey mead! The best possible expression of the subtleties from your chosen honey!! I wholeheartedly recommend raw meadmaking (or is it meadmaking in the raw??). ;)

OOC92
06-26-2008, 12:24 AM
Thanks I am quickly realizing the ridiculousness of that question. I just did not want to show up with a gallon of honey and suddenly so "Oh darn, that ain't going to work!"

GrantLee63
06-26-2008, 05:09 AM
Raw honey is all I use anymore. Don't get too freaked-out if you find bee body parts, wings, chunks of wax, etc., as those are just an indication of the lack of any processing. Raw honey = the best mead possible.

- GL63

OOC92
06-26-2008, 07:56 AM
Uhm body parts? Ok, and I take it you run it through a sieve?

Oskaar
06-26-2008, 08:00 AM
Nope.

The entire point is what comes in the bucket goes in the mead. No heating, straining, sulfiting, treating or anything else . . . no post processing whatsoever. Just mix it into the water, hit it with yeast and nutrient and let 'er buck!

Cheers,

Oskaar

CBBaron
06-26-2008, 09:14 AM
Uhm body parts? Ok, and I take it you run it through a sieve?

Leaving a liquid sit for a few months is a good way to separate the solids from the liquid through settling. Those "extras" just settle out and your a left with a clear mead.

I need to find a good local source, I know there are bee keeps in the area but so far the ones I know of only want to see in smaller quantities. Apparently the local demand keeps ahead of supply and margins are much better on those bears than on gallons.

Craig

OOC92
06-26-2008, 09:18 AM
Well then the beekeepers here must be doing well, I found a small local market, specializing in local products, that has a wall of honey- in gallons! I surf the internet and if 1 gallon of honey is 12 pounds, then 33 bucks aint bad to help out the local economy and local beeskeepers.

skunkboy
06-29-2008, 11:40 PM
Dead bee in every quality bottle... ::)

CBBaron
06-30-2008, 05:28 PM
Well the beekeeps must have had a decent spring. They had a gallon of "bottling tank" honey available for $36. Still a little expensive but not too bad. I picked it up and plan on making a raspberry mead when the berries are in season. Should be soon :)

Craig