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capoeirista13
08-24-2008, 04:31 PM
What temperature should the primary/secondary fermenters be stored in, cooler or warmer rooms? Currently it is varying between 75-85 degrees where I live, my basement is always a bit cooler, so that is an option, but I also have room in a few rooms. So I was wondering whether it'd be better to ferment in the hotter or the cooler rooms. Also should I continue to open and mix the must and extra water for a few days while it is in the primary or just mix it a lot when I first pour it in and then keep it sealed until I rack?

Medsen Fey
08-24-2008, 11:35 PM
During primary fermentation, higher temps will generally lead to more fusel alcohols and medicinal smelling/tasting phenolic compounds that can make your mead taste bad and may take years to age out (if they ever do). Higher temps may also lead to incomplete (stuck) fermentations. As a general rule keeping it in low 70s or lower is a good idea.

Cooler is definitely better for long term storage down to about 50F. Wine/Meads will age faster at higher temps during storage.

Those of us who live in warm climates are always interested in any success stories involving high temperature fermentation. If you do make mead in the 75-85F range and get anything really good, please share your results with us so we too can improve our warm weather meadmaking.

Aerating your must during the early part of fermentation (up to the 1/3 point) will help your yeast perform their best.

Good luck!
Medsen

Noe Palacios
08-25-2008, 12:05 AM
High temperature fermentation? Well, I could not resist the temtation and I have tried four time :BangHead:, all of them were bad experiences, I had to throw out everything: must, fermenters, everything :crybaby2:. I have heard that there are, some where, yeast strains that work good at high tempreature but for industrial sugar cane ethanol.

akueck
08-25-2008, 12:07 AM
Also check out the <a href="http://www.gotmead.com/Making-Mead-Articles/Yeast-What-to-Use.html">Yeast Table</a>, which contains manufacturer-recommended temperature ranges for many common yeast strains. Different strains have different optimal temperatures, so you might make one mead in the basement and another upstairs. In general it is best to be on the cooler side of the range.

akueck
08-25-2008, 12:07 AM
High temperature fermentation? Well, I could not resist the temtation and I have tried four time :BangHead:, all of them were bad experiences, I had to throw out everything: must, fermenters, everything :crybaby2:. I have heard that there are, some where, yeast strains that work good at high tempreature but for industrial sugar cane ethanol.


You threw out the fermenters? ???

Noe Palacios
08-25-2008, 12:11 AM
Yes Sir, I washed them several time and the bad odors still there, so I throw them, believe me it the best decision was to buy new ones.

Medsen Fey
08-25-2008, 09:16 AM
Yes Sir, I washed them several time and the bad odors still there, so I throw them, believe me it the best decision was to buy new ones.


Noe,
Here in the U.S. soaking with a product called Oxyclean is very good for removing odors from plastic fermenters. If it (or a comparable product) is available in your country, you might want to give it a try.

Teufelhund
08-25-2008, 11:10 AM
Noe,

Also, baking soda and water sol'n will work. Heck, even a 10% bleach solution will work.

:cheers:

DD

Noe Palacios
08-26-2008, 12:53 AM
Thanks again, but one thing is for sure, IŽll never will try to do high temperature fermentation.