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caps_phisto
09-26-2008, 05:42 PM
Hey all!

I was just wondering the best method to add more blueberry flavor/sweeten this recipe:

http://www.gotmead.com/smf/index.php?topic=7289.0

I got the color I wanted, and it seems to have a good ABV as it coats the glass very well. I just can't seem to taste the blueberry and it is a bit dry for my taste. Just wondering how I might go about adding more flavor and sweetening it.

To add a little more info to the above post and recipe. The mead is almost fully cleared, and I have racked it a total of three times now. I would like to try to keep it as clear as possible while adding flavor/sweet.

Thanks!

wayneb
09-26-2008, 05:49 PM
The blueberry flavor will intensify as the mead ages, but if you want to sweeten it a bit, just search on the terms "backsweetening" and "stabilization" and you'll find everything you need to know! :cheers:

caps_phisto
09-26-2008, 07:09 PM
Thanks for the tips. I searched around and found some good info. But as always, more information has lead to be questions....

I should have added earlier that to clear this mead I have refrigerated it in the low 30s for a week. Also as the previous post indicated I would rather not use chemicals (sulfites/sorbates) to clear my mead. So using those for stabilizing is also out.

My new question: If I leave my mead in the fridge until it completely clears (good enough to read through) and rack it regularly will that stabilize it enough to back sweeten with honey and prevent renewed fermentation?

I did use regular bread yeast and from what I have read that refrigeration seems to work with ale yeasts and lower alcohol toleratant yeasts.

Thanks again!

caps_phisto
09-26-2008, 11:28 PM
Ok, did a little more homework around the forums and found that cold crashing *might* work if I rack and rack and rack....and then it still might ferment.

I did find a post here: http://www.gotmead.com/smf/index.php?topic=5677.0

Where wayneb and Oskaar refer to something called sterile filtration.

Some searching on Google and around the forums have confirmed what was said in that thread. Sterile filtration will work along with cold crashing. So my next questions are:

EDIT: ignore this question....I do need a filter .25 micron to be exact...found that info a little later
How does one go about the process of sterile filtration?
EDIT: ignore these questions....same reason as above
Do you get a special filter that you run a finished mead through? Is it a special bottle filling device?

EDIT2: Ignore these questions...I think I may have found the answer. See below.
EDIT: Don't ignore this question! Are their any "over the counter" .25 micron filters I could incorporate into my siphon rather than buying the filter siphon combo?
Let's say all I have now is a simple "pump-action" siphon...how would I go about sterile fermentation?

Another hobby of mine beyond brewing is backpacking in my local area. I try to go on week long hikes and backpack around. As such I need to carry along with me a water filter to purify water from streams etc. I have a unit similar to this here: http://www.ems.com/catalog/product_detail_square.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=8455 24442594355&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=282574489160625

According to the specs of that unit it has a 0.30 micron filter. My new question is...

If I get a new filter (trust me I am not going to use the one I have been camping with!), push some boiling water through it, could this filter be enough for me to "sterile filter" my mead. It has been in my fridge for a week at around 35F and racked 2 times (1 to secondary for fermentation, 1 in cold crash).

Thanks and sorry for the bajillion edits...I'm just trying to keep my thought process public so that everyone can see where I am coming from!

Thanks again!

PS - This is probably a dumb question but with filtration do I need to be worried about O2 getting introduced into the system? Or is that just a worry during racking to prevent additional fermentation?

Brad Dahlhofer
09-27-2008, 12:33 AM
Since your a backpacker, you probably are aware of the new UV water purifiers that are being marketed to hikers and backpackers. I wonder if such a tool
could be held up to the siphon hose as you rack your mead to "sterilize" your mead.

Otherwise, please post your recipe. Specifically post your starting and ending gravities. I don't know the tolerance of bread yeast, but maybe a search through the forums could reveal the answer. If your yeast has reached its alcohol tolerance, then you might not have as big of a problem as you might think, and could avoid the hassle and expense of sterile filtering your mead.



Another hobby of mine beyond brewing is backpacking in my local area. I try to go on week long hikes and backpack around. As such I need to carry along with me a water filter to purify water from streams etc. I have a unit similar to this here: http://www.ems.com/catalog/product_detail_square.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=8455 24442594355&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=282574489160625

caps_phisto
09-27-2008, 07:43 AM
Recipe and process from first post in this thread:


Hey all!

I was just wondering the best method to add more blueberry flavor/sweeten this recipe:

http://www.gotmead.com/smf/index.php?topic=7289.0

Yeast tolerance is about 12% I got that somewhere off this site. I thought it was the yeast table but I couldn't find it on there anymore.

Thanks!

Tyred
09-27-2008, 08:07 AM
Yeast can be very persistent beasties. Filtration will remove most but not all of them. Some will always slip through. Cold crashing, racking, filtration will remove a majority of the yeast but there is always the possibility of some being left.

Freezing your must (after cold crash, rack and filtration) might take out any remaining yeast, but there is no guarantee for this.

Problem here is that you appear to be using bread yeast. Quality and ability to ferment are variable for this. From the other post it appears you mead may be around 10% and I've seen bread yeast get to 13% without really trying (with feeding up to 15%). We would require O.G, secondary gravity - before and after racking onto blueberries and current gravity. With this information we might be able to work out of the alcohol % is up over 14% - if so, we might have reached the maximum tolerance for the yeast.


I've just googled UV purifiers and found the following information.
""
Ultraviolet water purification lamps produce UV-C or "germicidal UV," radiation of much greater intensity than sunlight. Almost all of a UV lamp's output is concentrated in the 254 nanometers (nm) region in order to take full advantage of the germicidal properties of this wavelength. Most ultraviolet purification systems are combined with various forms of filtration, as UV light is only capable of killing microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, molds, algae, yeast, and oocysts like cryptosporidium and giardia. UV light generally has no impact on chlorine, VOCs, heavy metals, and other chemical contaminants. Nevertheless, it is probably the most cost effective and efficient technology available to homeowners to eliminate a wide range of biological contaminants from their water supply. Recent testing has also shown that UV can be effective at destroying certain VOC's, although we would not specifically recommend the technology for VOC reduction.

UV water treatment offers many advantages over other forms of water treatment for micobiological contaminants. Most importantly, it does not introduce any chemicals to the water, it produces no bi-products, and it does not alter the taste, pH, or other properties of the water. Accordingly, in addition to producing safe drinking water, it is not harmful to your plumbing and septic system.
""
From http://www.home-water-purifiers-and-filters.com/ultraviolet-filter.php

It does state that it will kill yeast but all information relates to water, not alcohol. Therefore, probably not recommended, but an idea to keep in the back of your mind.