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mjdtexan
02-19-2009, 10:59 AM
I was reading the "The Newbee Guide to Making Mead - Chapter 3: Additional Ingredients " and in it I read the following

-If you're using fresh fruit, peel or clean, cut up, and freeze. Freezing breaks the cell walls, and will help release more of the fruit flavor later. This should not be done with apples or citrus.

Would this be recommened for watermelon┐

Oskaar
02-19-2009, 02:01 PM
Welcome to Got Mead?

No, watermelon is a different animal entirely.

Use it as fresh as you can get it, seed it, then use the pulp and juice in the primary followed by another addition of fresh juice in the secondary. Ferment it at the bottom end of the temperature tolerance of the yeast you are going to use. I like 71B-1122 or DV10 for this one.

Cheers, Oskaar

mjdtexan
02-19-2009, 04:03 PM
Welcome to Got Mead?

No, watermelon is a different animal entirely.

Use it as fresh as you can get it, seed it, then use the pulp and juice in the primary followed by another addition of fresh juice in the secondary. Ferment it at the bottom end of the temperature tolerance of the yeast you are going to use. I like 71B-1122 or DV10 for this one.

Cheers, Oskaar

Thank You. I grow yellow meated and orange meated (high sugar content) watermelons. I plant in March and 80ish days later I have watermelon. I have not made any wine myself but yesterday evening I ordered a wine equipment kit, a Island Mist Blackberry Kit, a bunch of the chemicals and a degassing whip. I did order that particular yeast (Lalvin71B-1122) and I also ordered some Red Star Mantrochet (sp?). I ordered a few extra bungs, with and without drilled holes of various sizes, as well a few air locks. I am sure I missed something (I know I did, I forgot the acid test thing.) and I will get them when I cross that road.

The first thing I am going to make is that Joe's Ancient Orange and SpiceMead
. I saw it on another forum. Thats what made me do a search on Mead and thats how I landed here.

So, in a few days I should have a gallon of mead brewing (supposing the vendor is timely). :eek:

Mike D

Oskaar
02-19-2009, 08:39 PM
I'd be cognizant of your coliform bacteria count in watermelons you grow. This may be a case where sulfite is a beneficial addition prior to pitching your yeast. Depending on the type of fertilization you use and what kinds of counts you see it would be a good idea to have a handle on the numbers you're seeing there. Either way, I think I'd be more inclined at this point to go with DV10 as it is a more vigorous yeast, and has an active kill factor that will take out any spoilage yeast that may be present as well.

Cheers,

Oskaar

mjdtexan
02-19-2009, 08:44 PM
Thank You for the advise. You did make me go look up "coliform". I compost my soil and then let it sit for a while before I plant anything. Not a big fertilizer fan (except compost).

Oskaar
02-19-2009, 08:50 PM
Coliform bacteria are generally present to greater or lesser degrees in soil everywhere owing to the presence of dogs, cats, rats, mice, gophers, moles, voles, opossums, coyotes, etc. etc. etc. ad nauseum.

Just ringing the bell for caution! DUNG DUNG DUNG

Cheers, Oskaar

epetkus
02-19-2009, 09:41 PM
...Just ringing the bell for caution! DUNG DUNG DUNG

Cheers, Oskaar


Holy CRAP! :eek:

Eric

mjdtexan
02-19-2009, 09:46 PM
Holy CRAP! :eek:

Eric

Thats BS Man, 8)

Medsen Fey
02-20-2009, 03:04 PM
No, Pete'S HIT the nail on the head. This is not some caca-mamie idea. Many people have had failed watermelon wines because they often spoil quickly despite a large number of man-ures of work. It's not the fecal finger of fate at work, but spoilage organisms. There are some steps you can take.

First - keep everything as clean as possible and wash off the melons
#2 - Use sulfites liberally
Turd - Keep the fermentation temp as low as possible, another reason DV10 is good.

I'll be interested to se-wage you can do with it.

Medsen
having more fun than a 3rd grader should be allowed. :)

mjdtexan
02-20-2009, 03:54 PM
No, Pete'S HIT the nail on the head. This is not some caca-mamie idea. Many people have had failed watermelon wines because they often spoil quickly despite a large number of man-ures of work. It's not the fecal finger of fate at work, but spoilage organisms. There are some steps you can take.

First - keep everything as clean as possible and wash off the melons
#2 - Use sulfites liberally
Turd - Keep the fermentation temp as low as possible, another reason DV10 is good.

I'll be interested to se-wage you can do with it.

Medsen
having more fun than a 3rd grader should be allowed. :)

No No, I wasnt saying his post was BS. I was going with the whole "dung dung" and "holy crap" play on words because of the coliform bacteria. I would never just outright say something like that when I was fishing for answers. I am sorry to have given that impression.

Yes, I've been told that watermelon wine or mead is somewhat difficult to do. I do appreciate that fact. I am a little stubborn and I think I can get it done. I do appreciate the tips though.



After re-reading your post, I realize you were doing the same play on words that we were, only you did it better :)




First - keep everything as clean as possible and wash off the melons
#2 - Use sulfites liberally
Turd - Keep the fermentation temp as low as possible, another reason DV10 is good.

. :)

How low can I keep the fermentation┐

Medsen Fey
02-20-2009, 04:31 PM
With DV10 if the temp drops below 10C (50F) it can stool your fermentation. :)

mjdtexan
02-20-2009, 04:40 PM
With DV10 if the temp drops below 10C (50F) it can stool your fermentation. :)


(stool) Thats bad. Really bad Mr Fey :eek:

To be clear, ┐are you saying that you can get the must to fermit at 55f(ish) while using DV10?

Medsen Fey
02-20-2009, 05:05 PM
To be clear, ┐are you saying that you can get the must to fermit at 55f(ish) while using DV10?

Yep. Using a good starter may be helpful as well.

akueck
02-20-2009, 07:11 PM
I've got D254, BA-11, RC-212, and R#2 all plunging away at 59║F right now. D-47 has worked for me around that temp too. Things go slower than if it were warm, but they still go. The yeast might experience a little straining, so don't forget to dump in some nutrients occasionally. Watch out for that sulfur!