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Displaced Hick
06-11-2009, 07:05 PM
As of posting this there were 2 people curious about it, so here is the recipe.

1 lb beef and 3/4 lb pork ground together (coarse grind)
1 lb of decent steak cut into 1/2 inch cubes
4 tbsp or so of your favorite chili seasoning
1 16 oz. can diced tomatoes
lemon and lime juice (no set amount since this is to your personal taste)
12 to 18 oz. of Mountain Dew
2 tbsp bacon fat
Optional ingredients
2 or 3 16 oz cans chili beans (or a combo of kidney and red)
habenero sauce to taste.

Brown up all the meat in the bacon fat. For those that want onions in it brown the onions in the bacon fat first then brown the meat. Drain the meat well and toss into a crock pot, and the onions if y'all want to add the nasty little buggers. Mix in the chili seasoning along with the MD. There will be some foaming, but most of us should be used to seeing foam on top of stuff right? Start adding the lemon and lime juice and taste until you are satisfied with it. Add the beans, cover, and cook on low for as long as possible (I try for a good 12 hour simmer) stirring around once an hour, you don't want this stuff to burn on the bottom do you?

This creation was brought about because of my love for hot sauces. The sugar in the pop doesn't really lessen the heat but to me it does seem to cut back on the perceived heat, kind of like a higher ABV mead can seem sweet even though it was fermented to dryness.

Now I just need to come up with a good mead or braggot to go along with this on those cold winter nights.

I know this isn't a true chili, it has beans in it, but then again I am not a bowl of red lovin' Texan, I am a hick out of Wyoming.

afdoty
06-11-2009, 07:35 PM
Very nice! Thank you very much for posting that.....

Displaced Hick
06-11-2009, 10:20 PM
This also works quite well with Dr. Pepper. I have also used various beers, though I have only used Coors and various mexican beers. You can sub in a few shots of tequila or whiskey for some of the liquid go with chili borrachas.

Kee
06-12-2009, 04:19 AM
OMG! I saw the title and thought you were making a Mt. Dew Capsimel!! That's clever and original. It actually sounds kind of good if you can get around the issues of making mead with Mt. Dew. So I opened and the recipe started off with beef... :o Okay. It's late. Time for bed!!

afdoty
06-12-2009, 05:58 AM
This also works quite well with Dr. Pepper. I have also used various beers, though I have only used Coors and various mexican beers. You can sub in a few shots of tequila or whiskey for some of the liquid go with chili borrachas.

I bet it would be incredible if you with a strong dry Melomel...maybe something that didn't come out just right. I just so happen to have a Jalapeno experiment that's very undrinkable. Was saving it to cook with...Tada!

TheRabidKumquat
06-12-2009, 09:09 AM
thanks! I'll give this a try next time I make some chili

STLBrewer
06-12-2009, 11:12 AM
This also works quite well with Dr. Pepper. I have also used various beers, though I have only used Coors and various mexican beers. You can sub in a few shots of tequila or whiskey for some of the liquid go with chili borrachas.

Guinness (both Draught and Extra Stout) works great with any chili...there are many recipes out there for chili that call for adding a little bit of coffee (or grounds). The roasted grains in any stout work well...Guinness is just easier to find than most.

akueck
06-12-2009, 11:35 AM
"Drunken beans", while not chili, are also very good and we like to make them at my house. Recipe calls for 12 oz of beer, a can of diced tomatoes, and a can of beans. We like to add a second can of beans. Onions and garlic if you like. Adobo sauce to taste, and a little brown sugar; we also like to add some vinegar but we are vinegar people. :) I've used bitter and brown ales, stout would work too.

Displaced Hick
06-12-2009, 05:34 PM
I bet it would be incredible if you with a strong dry Melomel...maybe something that didn't come out just right. I just so happen to have a Jalapeno experiment that's very undrinkable. Was saving it to cook with...Tada!

Funny you should mention that, once the pepper plants out in the back yard start producing I was going to make some chile meads. I'll probably do a 5 gallon straight batch and rack off to 1 gallon carboys. I am thinking of a jalepeno, a roasted habenero, an anaheim, a roasted anaheim, and maybe a roasted jalepeno/habenero. I was thinking of just making them for the sole purpose of cooking with.:D

afdoty
06-12-2009, 07:37 PM
Funny you should mention that, once the pepper plants out in the back yard start producing I was going to make some chile meads. I'll probably do a 5 gallon straight batch and rack off to 1 gallon carboys. I am thinking of a jalepeno, a roasted habenero, an anaheim, a roasted anaheim, and maybe a roasted jalepeno/habenero. I was thinking of just making them for the sole purpose of cooking with.:D

Nice! If you're just going for a "cooking" mead, try for a dry, SG around 1.115/1.120 and an FG around 1.000. If you want to drink it, wellllllllllllllllll.... it's funky…maybe something sweeter???

What I did was a 1-gallon batch with 5# clover honey, 6 Jalapeno Peppers (de-seeded), 5 gm D-47, 3/4 tsp grape tannin, and water to get an SG 1.122. The flavors of the peppers come through, but the over all batch is to dry and to astringent. I could sweeten and play with it, but I was more interested in how the pepper would act in the primary.

Anyway.................If you want to cook with it, de-seed and de-vein the peppers. That should remove the heat. You can always add heat back in when you cook with it. Going with the secondary is a good idea. You'll have more control over the batch. With the D-47 you should end up dry, with enough alcohol to leach out all the peppery goodness.

Roasted Habenero......hmmm.. Just when you think you're out, they pull you back in!!!!!!!!!!!!! :cool:

Hey this time next year we’ll have to trade chili/mead recipes…the Got Mead Chili Cook Off!!!!!!!!!!!!

akueck
06-12-2009, 10:13 PM
There are some recipes in Wild Wines & Meads that are for marinades or cooking wines which sound interesting. Garlic wine, Onion/Carrot/Celery wine, etc. I keep meaning to try one of these but haven't gotten up the gumption yet. I'm thinking the onion, carrot, and celery might go well in an apple juice base. Maybe even vinegarize some of it. ;)

Displaced Hick
06-14-2009, 01:25 AM
Hey this time next year we’ll have to trade chili/mead recipes…the Got Mead Chili Cook Off!!!!!!!!!!!!

I am currently working on a rattlesnake white chili variation. I am just having a problem locating a good/reliable source for the rattler meat.;D