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Axel-san
01-07-2010, 03:11 AM
making my 1st batch of mead. I used D47 yeast. I added yeast nutrients and energizer, but nothing much seems to be happening after 1 week. Temp might be a little low, ~ 67. Anything else I should try. Add ale yeast?
Also, peer inside and some white stuff floating on top of fluid. I did skim off all the white foam while heating honey mixture. Any ideas?

TheRabidKumquat
01-07-2010, 03:44 AM
You'll be able to get more help if you posted specifics on this batch of mead: ingredients and process/procedure. The more the more knowledgeable members know about the situation, the better they will be able to help diagnose and solve.

67 is right around the sweet spot for D-47. I would guess that the white stuff on the surface is the yeast I wouldn't add ale yeast.

Are you aerating it? If not, I would do so. What was your starting gravity, and what is it now? Can you measure the pH?

wildaho
01-07-2010, 06:53 AM
Welcome to GotMead? Axel-san!


making my 1st batch of mead. I used D47 yeast. I added yeast nutrients and energizer, but nothing much seems to be happening after 1 week. Temp might be a little low, ~ 67. Anything else I should try. Add ale yeast?
Also, peer inside and some white stuff floating on top of fluid. I did skim off all the white foam while heating honey mixture. Any ideas?

Do you have a hydrometer? And if so, did you take a measurement before pitching? When you say "peer inside", I'm assuming you are using a bucket? Buckets are notorious for leaking and not letting your airlock work. You do have an airlock? A hydrometer will give you a better picture than peering inside any day. Mead musts never get as active in the fermenter as I've seen some beers get.

Hmmm

Can you give us some specifics as to what you have done so far? What is your brewing experience? Sounds like you heated your honey. What temp did you pitch your yeast, and how? How and when did you add your nutrients? Did you aerate? Etc., etc., etc.,

If you don't give us details, we can't help. Otherwise, we are guessing in the dark. There are a lot of ways to make mead. Until we know which way you chose to make yours, we can't help you determine whether your mead is stuck or whether you are not familiar with how some meads can ferment. Help us help you.

Oskaar
01-07-2010, 10:11 AM
Axel-San,

Welcome to Got Mead?

Please take a moment to familiarize yourself with the forum, and where to post your questions. We have areas for questions. You originally posted this in the "Got Mead site News" forum which is not the place for questions about your batches in progress.

I hope you find everything you need to make excellent mead while you're here on Got Mead?

Cheers,

Oskaar

ZachR
01-07-2010, 02:37 PM
I actually have a related question... I made up a batch last night with D47 (my brewlog is called "Local NC Wildflower Traditional"), and it is currently sitting at 57* with some airlock activity and visible floating yeast cultures. Should I try to warm it up a little bit or just leave it?

Found this on Lallemand's website (http://www.lallemandwine.us/cellar/chardonnay.php):

"Enoferm ICV-D47: For complex whites with citrus and floral notes
ICV-D47 is a Côtes du Rhône isolate for the production of full-bodied barrel fermented Chardonnay and other white varietals. Although ICV-D47 has an optimum temperature range of 18° to 28°C, the best results are obtained at around 20°C. When left on lees, ripe spicy aromas with tropical and citrus notes are developed. ICV-D47 is a high polysaccharide producer known for its accentuated fruit and great volume."

wayneb
01-07-2010, 05:14 PM
In general the lower the temperature of a mead fermentation, the less fusels and higher order phenolics will be produced. So, all other things being equal, the lower temp ferment will provide you with a drinkable mead with less aging than required for stuff fermented at higher temps.

Given that 18C is roughly 64F, though, you might find that the pace of fermentation is pretty slow with this batch.

If I were doing it, as long as I had evidence of fermentation at a reasonable pace, I'd leave it at the cooler temp that you've got it in now.

Axel-san
01-31-2010, 02:56 AM
To all that helped answer my question before, thank you. I thought I replied as for what went into my mead, but then again, maybe I didn't.
It was 12 lbs of honey, 1oz vanilla, 5 tps of a combo acid mix I bought, 5 tbs yeast nutrient and 1 tbs yeast energizer. Just some old school, plain mead.
I just transferred my batch to my glass carboy on Friday. But I did get greedy at the end of the transfer and tilted the main fermentation bucket too quick, so suck about 1/3 of my sediment into the carboy.

Medsen Fey
01-31-2010, 10:08 AM
Hello Axel-san,

Did the mead finish fermenting? What was the final gravity (and the starting gravity)?

From your description, the slow start may have been due to the acid added as part of the recipe. That often causes the pH to drop too low.

And if you sucked up some of the sediment, it will just settle back to the bottom in a couple of days so no big deal.

Medsen