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dr9
02-13-2010, 09:28 AM
Cold vs Warm

Another hobby of mine is trout fishing. In Georgia, there are few streams that run cold enough to hold enough dissolved oxygen required by trout to survive, according to DNR literature and other sources.

The magic number is 70 degrees in the water before trout start floating.

This has made me wonder: Is it better to use spring water from the refrigerator (vs room temp)to shake up before adding to must/wort/grape juice?

Does any of this tie into anything that you know to be true, any practices you follow for oxygen in your must?

Discuss!

dr9
02-13-2010, 09:47 AM
Or, conversely, a better practice to rack/bottle as warm as you can to avoid oxygenation?

dr9
02-13-2010, 12:31 PM
Jackpot.

http://water.usgs.gov/owq/FieldManual/Chapter6/6.2.4.pdf

Apparently, the difference is vast. Near freezing, water can hold almost double the amount of oxygen than warm water.

15 ppx near freezing, to 8 ppx at 29 degrees C.

The 'x' indicates 'i don't know' because it doesn't say.

akueck
02-13-2010, 01:45 PM
Yup, gases dissolving in liquids works better when it's cold. Yay entropy!

I would choose the temperature of things based on yeast/fermentation ideals rather than dissolved oxygen equilibrium. You can always add more air (stir!). As for racking, avoiding splashing/agitation as much as possible should be enough to minimize oxidation. Liquids don't exactly suck air into them in a short period of time (I assume racking takes less than an hour) without help.

wayneb
02-13-2010, 09:19 PM
BTW, that is one reason that slightly overprimed bottle conditioned beer can be made to behave (i.e. not geyser as much on opening) by chilling it in the fridge for several hours before popping the cap. More CO2 stays in solution when cold, too.

dr9
02-14-2010, 03:34 AM
BTW, that is one reason that slightly overprimed bottle conditioned beer can be made to behave (i.e. not geyser as much on opening) by chilling it in the fridge for several hours before popping the cap. More CO2 stays in solution when cold, too.


I also noticed that after cold crashing my rambunctious hefeweizen.