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dr9
02-15-2010, 04:53 PM
In English, it says after rehydrating to "add to previously sulphited must".

The French instructions are much longer and I can't read them.

I plan on using it in Joe's Pyment. What is a sulphited must?

FWIW.. the "Nutrients" link in the newbee guide is still a redirect to yeast.

Question 2: Is Lallevand EC-1118 the same thing as Red Star P. Cuvee? In doing a search here, I found some references to this issue.

Question 3: It is a temp. tolerant yeast. Fusel alcohols are created at higher temps. I want to ferment this at lower temps. Say, 50 degrees F for the primary. Can I expect the primary to be done in 24 to 48 hours max at lower temps, as they would be in the 70's?

akueck
02-15-2010, 04:58 PM
A sulfited must is one to which you have added sulfites (Campden). Standard practice in wine is to add sulfites and add yeast the next day. This kills the wild yeasts living on the grapes. With pasteurized juice, you have less a need for this.

EC-1118 and Premier Cuvee are very similar if not the same.

50 F might be a little on the cold side, not many yeasts are vigorous fermenters below 58 or so. You definitely won't finish in 48 hours at that temperature. If you want to stay cool, I'd say shoot for 60-64 F.

dr9
02-15-2010, 07:35 PM
I don't know if I believe you. What are your credentials? Who are your LinkedIn connections? We are talking about an 80 cent packet of yeast here. That's a nutritional school lunch for a poor hungry child. I refuse to treat such matters flippantly.

buzzerj
02-20-2010, 12:36 PM
You can take what akueck says to the bank. I've used both EC-1118 and Premier Cuvee yeasts for Joe's Pyment and got great results from both. I haven't done any side by side comparisons on the pyments because I used different grape juice bases. But both were great results for pyments. But if you think you need to ferment at such cold temperatures for a pyment to prevent fusel production go ahead and try. Some just have to learn the hard way. Even with a Champagne yeast, such a cold temperature is a fermentation nightmare. If your fermentation is slow and stops somewhere around 1.050, well you might consider then that you didn't take some good advice. Your final result will be much better with fermentation temps in even the upper 60's. If you're hell bent on trying to ferment this in the 50's, try a gallon test batch and see how the fermentation takes it's course. You'll know what effects the temperature has on the yeast in a couple weeks. Then you'll have a better idea of the temperature to use. Relative to sulphiting your must, you can if you want. Just add Sulphite 24 hours before adding the yeast. Then your must will have no bacterial/yeast contamination prior to pitching the yeast. I've made Joe's Pyment in quite a few forms and have never bothered to sulphite the must beforehand. But it is a precaution. Otherwise, either of your yeasts are pretty active and should outcompete and ferment your must well. If you want first hand knowledge in the differences in the yeasts, make a 2 gallon batch of must, split it into two fermenters and pitch both yeasts. But I'd agree with akueck and ferment it in the 60's. Best of luck.

Buzzer

ezbrew
03-01-2013, 04:11 PM
My last batch of mead was starteg on aug 2012 . no air in my house fermented in basement ,lowest temp I had was 76 deg and fermentation took a long time to end, very heavy on the Honey! bottled in Nov ,finally opened first bottle last Sat. It was GREAT

Marc F.
03-03-2013, 03:12 PM
no air in my house

I hope you meant to say air conditioning ;D

Bob1016
03-03-2013, 07:35 PM
I would love to live in a house where I could vent the atmosphere at will!

kudapucat
03-06-2013, 07:56 AM
I would love to live in a house where I could vent the atmosphere at will!

Effective alarm system.

xopher425
03-10-2013, 11:45 PM
No, a criminal breaking your window to steal your stuff would get sucked in with the vortex of wind filling the vacuum, break his neck, then sue you for everything you have (still effectively robbing you, but it hurts you a lot more.)

At least, that's the type of justice we have here in the US. Other locales may be more logical.

Marshmallow Blue
03-11-2013, 11:56 AM
No, a criminal breaking your window to steal your stuff would get sucked in with the vortex of wind filling the vacuum, break his neck, then sue you for everything you have (still effectively robbing you, but it hurts you a lot more.)

At least, that's the type of justice we have here in the US. Other locales may be more logical.

Don't worry, Just sue the manufacturer of the wind turbine or whatever it is. Then take the case winnings of that to counter sue the robber for wasting your time.