PDA

View Full Version : is this normal ?



ash
03-02-2010, 09:48 PM
I have some strage things going on. This is some weeks after racking and adding a liter of apple juice (both batches)


batch one:

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs487.ash1/26629_1387352404628_1256605723_31142545_4368141_n. jpg

batch twoo:

http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs487.snc3/26629_1387352284625_1256605723_31142542_166911_n.j pg
http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs487.ash1/26629_1387352684635_1256605723_31142551_438014_n.j pg


has enyone seen this before?

Medsen Fey
03-02-2010, 09:51 PM
Ash, what are we looking at here?

Batch 1 looks like there might be some fermentation going on. Can you give us the recipe and process details?

ash
03-02-2010, 09:52 PM
I know, had the wrong link, should be good now

dr9
03-02-2010, 10:00 PM
Mother of Vinegar?

ash
03-02-2010, 10:41 PM
6 kg honey per 15 L batch, just tossed in some cinamon, some clove and half an apple cut into small pieces). I put the rehydrated yeast in that (Vinoferm, Bioferm Blanc : saccharomyces cérevisiae ellipsoidus 'Epernay'), a bit of yeast nutricion and let it sit in a carboy with airlock.

This goes for both batches, exept for batch 2, where I pasturised and used a yeast starter.

They have been sitting since september last year. Everything went normally (but slow). A couple of weeks ago I racked them and topped them with apple juice without preservatives.

Batch one has an ever so fine foam on top of it now, looks like yeasties indeed.
Batch twoo has a cloudy looking thing floating in it.

wayneb
03-02-2010, 11:19 PM
My first guess, given your pictures, is that fermentation has re-started with the addition of the apple juice and you have colonies of yeast in there. The second batch appears to have formed a yeast "pellicle," and the first one just has a layer of yeast on top. It is possible, though unlikely, that it is an acetobacter infection. One way to easily tell is to give them a sniff. If you smell vinegar (acetic acid), then you have a problem. If all smells well (not spoiled, acetic, or mouldy) then you are probably OK.

ash
03-02-2010, 11:28 PM
so if all smells good, then its just another couple of months waiting....

I want to drink it, not wait for it :)


by now batch one is pulling water back towards the carboy, so it's done fermenting again. The foamy stuff is till there, but not as much as in the picture. Dead yeasties floating?

Bach twoo is still having airloch activity, be it very few.

What do I do with both batches ?

Can you tell me more about the yeast "pellicle", I'm eager to learn more.


thx !

ash
03-03-2010, 10:25 AM
it certainly does not smel like vinnigar. They both have a fruity smell (with a lot of clove in it), and the second batch also still smells CO2ish, but then that would be normal, since the airlock is still showing activity.

What dou you guys think I should do with those batches?

Oldonehundredth
03-03-2010, 11:06 AM
The wild fermented brewers of beer in your location have seen their share of both pellicle (photo one) and glob (photo two), along with ropiness, acetic infection, etc., which could be the clues to understanding what is going on in your batches. Suggest you ask around and find a lambic brewer in your area, who can identify the tastes and smells also. If you manage to do so, let us know what they say. This might actually be a good thing, it's just kind of hard to say at the moment.

wayneb
03-03-2010, 12:52 PM
Some yeast strain colonies will naturally form localized collections of cells; as Oldonehundreth noted, this is fairly common in wild yeast fermentations, but it can also happen occasionally in homebrews that have been inoculated with mixtures of strains of yeast. I don't know if it is a symbiotic association of the mixed strains or if it is instead a "self defensive" mechanism of one strain in a multi-culture must, but the yeast can collect either in a surface layer or in a distinct globular formation near the surface. Again, neither is much cause for concern unless you detect some off-putting smells from the must.

ash
03-03-2010, 12:55 PM
I'm affraid I know no collegue homebrewers around here and the big proffesional brewers can't be bothered...

I guess I'm not to pannic?

What do you meen by 'glob'. I can't seem to find anything on google that makes sense :-)

wayneb
03-03-2010, 01:01 PM
A "glob" is a soft, thick lump of something. In American English the term is used to describe a lump of something that is not hard and that has an irregular shape. Very much like the yeast colony that is floating around in your batch #2! ;D

ash
03-03-2010, 01:13 PM
oh ok, like the 80's horrorflick :p

wayneb
03-03-2010, 01:27 PM
That's "The Blob," but yeah -- close enough! ;D

ZachR
03-03-2010, 01:29 PM
I don't want to hijack this thread, but what kind of bottle is that in the 3rd pic and where did you get it? That thing is really cool... it almost looks like a huge Orangina bottle.

ash
03-03-2010, 04:56 PM
it does !
I couldn't tell you what brand it is.
I bought it in my local distillery. They have lots of brewing stuff there, elas not the know-how to answer all of my questions. :-)

Angelic Alchemist
03-03-2010, 05:12 PM
A "glob" is a soft, thick lump of something. In American English the term is used to describe a lump of something that is not hard and that has an irregular shape. Very much like the yeast colony that is floating around in your batch #2! ;D

Ah hahahaha! Wayne, you are so dry! Love it. On a side not (though not a total hijack) this thread has relaxed some of my fears regarding a batch of Poltorak I have sitting in the coat closet at the moment. It has a similar layer of gack at the top of the carboy (resembling batch #1 in the photo), but smells fantastic. I can post photos and the recipe (here or on a new thread) if people want to see.

wayneb
03-03-2010, 06:34 PM
Ah hahahaha! Wayne, you are so dry! Love it.

So are my meads! ;)

But seriously, if you have pics to post, feel free! I love to look at the progress of other folks' batches -- but do start a new thread so we don't hijack this one any further. ;D

ash
03-04-2010, 09:16 AM
the meads I'm working on right now do not really have a lot of smell. Maybe next time I should spend more on the honey ?

Medsen Fey
03-04-2010, 10:48 AM
Better honey gives better mead, but more expensive doesn't always mean better. Sometime getting it fresh from the beekeeper is actually cheaper, with superior honey.

What type of honey did you use?

Also keep in mind, it is very common for new meads to have little honey aroma and to be very harsh. You will be amazed how much the aroma will develop with a year of aging.

Medsen

AToE
03-04-2010, 12:32 PM
Just to reaffirm what Medsen said, I've had a couple go 4-7 months smelling like nothing, and then suddenly they started to smell (and taste) like honey again. It's pretty neat, can't wait to see what happens at 1 year, 2 years, etc.:)

ash
03-04-2010, 12:44 PM
what do I do with the glob ? Do I siphon to another carboy before adding sulfites and stuff ?

wayneb
03-04-2010, 03:13 PM
Yes, siphon around the glob, taking as little of it as possible (preferably none). Consider it as the same as the lees layer at the bottom of your carboy. You don't want it in there when you are in the process of stabilizing your mead for bottling.

Angelic Alchemist
03-04-2010, 07:53 PM
Better honey gives better mead, but more expensive doesn't always mean better. Sometime getting it fresh from the beekeeper is actually cheaper, with superior honey.
Medsen

This is so true! I've been buying local honey at $25/gallon and the mead turns out great. I decided to try a batch of heather mead and blew $40 on about 2lbs of the stuff, and it is pretty funny tasting last I checked.

Medsen Fey
03-04-2010, 07:59 PM
Oh, don't judge the heather too harshly Angel, it needs time - lots of time. It has a distinctive flavor with a bitterness in the finish that may not be to everyone's liking, but I've got some now that is hitting the 2 year mark and it is really improving. It's got another couple of years to go, but by then I hope it will be great. I think it is really good stuff - with the most powerful aroma of any honey I've tried.

Angelic Alchemist
03-04-2010, 08:53 PM
Oh, don't judge the heather too harshly Angel, it needs time - lots of time. It has a distinctive flavor with a bitterness in the finish that may not be to everyone's liking, but I've got some now that is hitting the 2 year mark and it is really improving. It's got another couple of years to go, but by then I hope it will be great. I think it is really good stuff - with the most powerful aroma of any honey I've tried.

Noted. The 1 gallon jug is sitting in the closet right now under airlock and will age for as long as it needs. The first time I tried the heather honey, it surprised the heck out of me: I was expecting floral and got punched in the face with smokey coniferous notes instead!

ash
03-05-2010, 09:38 AM
I used bakery honey, for 16 kg I paid only 90 Euro.