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Medsen Fey
03-15-2010, 09:46 AM
I saw the trailer for the new Robin Hood movie staring Russel Crowe being released May 14. Crowe is looking older and fatter (like he's been imbibing more mead and ale maybe), and I hope we don't see him in tights, but I figure it should still be fun. It certainly looks like a good "mead flick" though I don't know if they will even mention mead in the movie.

As a way to get in the spirit, I was wondering if anyone has some good ideas for a Robin Hood themed mead recipe?

wayneb
03-15-2010, 11:14 AM
I'm sure we could come up with something.... ;D

First, the honey of Sherwood would likely be wildflower, with a heavy component of honeydew from the trees in that forest. Since honeydew honeys tend to be "strong" flavored (and not to everyone's liking), I suspect that some sort of metheglin using aromatic and flavorful herbs that would be common in late medieval England would be in order.

What do you think?

Smarrikåka
03-15-2010, 01:52 PM
What do you think?

I think whatever you use, you'll have to steal ingridents from the rich, and give mead to the poor.

Sharing it with the worker bees, would kind of work too.

dr9
03-15-2010, 04:13 PM
He didn't rob from the rich, he robbed from the wasteful overspending royal government and gave it back to the taxpayers who could barely afford to ..... sigh.. nevermind.

fatbloke
03-15-2010, 05:39 PM
I'm sure we could come up with something.... ;D

First, the honey of Sherwood would likely be wildflower, with a heavy component of honeydew from the trees in that forest. Since honeydew honeys tend to be "strong" flavored (and not to everyone's liking), I suspect that some sort of metheglin using aromatic and flavorful herbs that would be common in late medieval England would be in order.

What do you think?
No. It's all fantasy. There's no proof that anyone like that ever existed, a bit like "King Arthur" and that lot.

So, while not wanting to p155 on Medsens idea. Historically, and I believe factually, the woodland of that area of Nottinghamshire, would have probably been made up from largely Oak.

Which means that you should be thinking of picking the fresh growth of oak leaves, have a look around for a recipe for a wine that's made from them (I seem to recall at least 1 in existence) and substitute the sugar for a strong flavoured wild flower honey.........

Oh and don't forget, it would have been aged in Oak barrels so you'd probably need chips, staves, cubes or a real barrel......

Just my 2 groats worth.....


regards

Sir Cumference.....

p.s. or with the Russell Crowe input into the film you could always either distill yourself some neutral spirit, or buy some vodka and get a flavouring pack for an Australian Rum and fortify it with that......

Angelic Alchemist
03-15-2010, 06:04 PM
He didn't rob from the rich, he robbed from the wasteful overspending royal government and gave it back to the taxpayers who could barely afford to ..... sigh.. nevermind.

I plan on procuring the recipe from this site and making a batch for Sherwood Forest Faire next year. The season is on now, so the concoction should be ready to drink by 2011, yes?

wayneb
03-15-2010, 06:04 PM
Wait one minute, fatbloke!!

To hell with historical "fact." We want period accuracy! ;D

Now... that gives me a thought. I have some questions for you, our "local" authority. Was the wood in Nottinghamshire also primarily oak back in the day? Is it white oak, or other species?


And Sir, I like the new moniker, BTW! ;)

dr9
03-15-2010, 06:12 PM
p.s. or with the Russell Crowe input into the film you could always either distill yourself some neutral spirit, or buy some vodka and get a flavouring pack for an Australian Rum and fortify it with that......

Or stabilize it with just enough cocaine to numb the lips.

wildoates
03-15-2010, 08:04 PM
Fatbloke, please stop destroying my cherished illusions. I can only take so much of that in one lifetime, and I've never really got over finding out that my parents were Santa Claus.

:)

Dan McFeeley
03-15-2010, 08:19 PM
Here's a link to a 13/14th century recipe for mead:

http://www.greydragon.org/library/13thCenturyMead.html

Digby, or Cindy Renfro's "A Sip Through Time" would have other period recipes.

--

wayneb
03-15-2010, 10:48 PM
Dan, I think that a combination of 13th century recipe and process, with an infusion made from fresh young oak leaves (pending confirmation from fatbloke that oak was predominant in 'Sherwood' back then) would make an ideal Mead of the 'Hood! ;D

I think I'd like to try this one out, come later in Spring, if I can just find some oak trees around here somewhere....

Dan McFeeley
03-16-2010, 04:06 AM
I have a recipe somewhere for oak leaf wine, but this link from Jack Keller's site might be better:

http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/oakleaf.asp

--

sandman
03-16-2010, 11:35 AM
Fatbloke, please stop destroying my cherished illusions. I can only take so much of that in one lifetime, and I've never really got over finding out that my parents were Santa Claus.

:)

YOUR parents are the Claus's?!?!? Hey, thank them for all the gifts I've gotten over the years for me ok?
:cheers:

Angelic Alchemist
03-17-2010, 03:16 PM
This is some info from a 12th century French poem mentioning oak and wild apple trees. Fiction, though I imagine the author may have used imagry describing common botany of the time.

http://cunnan.sca.org.au/wiki/12th_Century_plants

Medsen Fey
03-17-2010, 04:02 PM
So for the oak leave recipe, do you think Nottingham ale yeast is okay? What about poison oak honey?

Call me crazy if you like, but I keep imaging a recipe for a Marionberry batch; sort of an "I made Marion" melomel. ;D

dr9
03-17-2010, 04:05 PM
Again with the cocaine. There'd be no devil's share there in the shire of sherwood and such.

Angelic Alchemist
03-17-2010, 04:48 PM
So for the oak leave recipe, do you think Nottingham ale yeast is okay? What about poison oak honey?



Wild Apple and Poison Oak Cyser.

Angelic Alchemist
03-17-2010, 07:34 PM
Inspiration strikes! This is a suggested recipe based off the posts from this thread. Let me know what you think.

7pts oak leaves (according to the recipe Mr. McFeeley posted)
2-3lbs poison oak honey (good call, Mr. Fey - granted, poison oak isn't really an oak, but hey it's fantasy. Maybe English wildflower would work too.)
1 gallon water
Crab apple juice (enough to replace the orange and lemon juice from the link)
Pectic Enzyme? If needed
Nutrient
Nottingham Ale Yeast (again, good call, Mr. Fey - anyone know the EtOH tolerance of this yeast? I'm not an ale girl)

I'd essentially follow the directions from the link Mr McFeeley posted, but I wouldn't boil the honey. Thoughts?

dr9
03-17-2010, 09:40 PM
I'd essentially follow the directions from the link Mr McFeeley posted, but I wouldn't boil the honey. Thoughts?


Put some cocaine in it.

akueck
03-18-2010, 12:14 AM
Haha, I thought for a second you meant poison oak leaves. :eek:

Nottingham should get to at least 10%.

wildaho
03-18-2010, 03:00 AM
AA: crab apples would add a much more tannic note rather than acidic note as a replacement for the orange and lemon juices. With all the oak leaves, would this be a good thing? I like the way you are thinking though!

Angelic Alchemist
03-18-2010, 04:51 PM
@dr9 - Cocaine is from the tropics. Opium or hashish would be more historically accurate, since trade routes to the East became active during/after the Crusades. ;D

@Akueck - Ah hahahaha! That would be a wine for people I don't like! 10%? Probably 2lbs of honey would be enough, or 2.5 if we want to go sweet. I was looking online and found both English wildflower AND English forest honey. The English forest honey sounds really good. Here's the link:

http://www.englishhoneyonline.co.uk/continental-honey/forest-honey-1-x-340g/prod_34.html

@Wildaho - Good point. I've never actually had a crab apple. I guess we need to find something else to balance the flavors of the must commonly found in 12th century England.

Medsen Fey
03-18-2010, 05:18 PM
That forest honey is from the continent, so it technically isn't English, though it does sound good.

I'm thinking of using some heather perhaps blended with some wildflower.

For acidity, I suppose you could use rose hips. The English certainly had roses - they fought wars over them right? ;D

Angelic Alchemist
03-18-2010, 05:29 PM
That forest honey is from the continent, so it technically isn't English, though it does sound good.

I'm thinking of using some heather perhaps blended with some wildflower.

For acidity, I suppose you could use rose hips. The English certainly had roses - they fought wars over them right? ;D

Not English? I'm confused. Here's the other link I saw (same site, different page). It includes heather, wildflower, forest and a few others.

http://www.activeenglishhoney.co.uk/english-honey

Rose hips could work well with the oak leaves. I also found a site saying, "Wild fruits were gathered, including cherries, apples, blackberries, blueberries, elderberries, rowan berries and hazelnuts." These are notes from 12th century Scotland, which I think shares common ecosystems with England. Correct me if my geography is off. Here's the site:

http://www.janetmcnaughton.ca/ekfood.html

Medsen Fey
03-18-2010, 06:37 PM
Not English? I'm confused. Here's the other link I saw (same site, different page). It includes heather, wildflower, forest and a few others.

http://www.activeenglishhoney.co.uk/english-honey

Those are the English Honeys. The other ones in the prior link come from other parts of Europe. I've been looking for some Poison Oak honey but haven't had any luck finding any so far.

I'd love to try some Rowan berries.

Angelic Alchemist
03-18-2010, 07:31 PM
Those are the English Honeys. The other ones in the prior link come from other parts of Europe. I've been looking for some Poison Oak honey but haven't had any luck finding any so far.

I'd love to try some Rowan berries.

Ah! Now I see what you mean. Thanks for clarifying. I found a link that might have poison oak honey (says it will be available after November 2009) but I didn't send an email to confirm yet.

http://www.mainbrew.com/pages/honeytypes.html

A quick glance tells me Rowan berries need to be cooked before they are used in foodstuffs. Again, this is new territory for me so I'm not sure this is correct. Anyone know what they taste like? I was leaning towards cherry to make up for acidity, and elderberry just because I love that line from the movie, "Legend" - yeah, yeah. I'm a dork.

Medsen Fey
03-18-2010, 07:39 PM
I found a link that might have poison oak honey (says it will be available after November 2009) but I didn't send an email to confirm yet.

http://www.mainbrew.com/pages/honeytypes.html


I called them earlier today and they don't have any. Great minds think alike? ;D

Smarrikåka
03-18-2010, 07:43 PM
Rowan berries, are very, very bitter. I've tasted rowanberry mead that was quite good, but the rowanberry dose was small in that, and it should probably be kept such, because they're pretty powerful.

Side note: That "Thanks for clarifying" satement looks so punny due to the auto-linking on this board.

Angelic Alchemist
03-18-2010, 07:55 PM
Rowan berries, are very, very bitter. I've tasted rowanberry mead that was quite good, but the rowanberry dose was small in that, and it should probably be kept such, because they're pretty powerful.

Side note: That "Thanks for clarifying" satement looks so punny due to the auto-linking on this board.

Oh, you MUST behave or you'll be the PRIMARY target for another pun-off!

Here's my revised ingredient list:

7 pints oak leaves
1 gallon water
2-2.5lbs honey (English Wildflower and English Heather)
Juice of crab apple, cherry and elderberry to taste
pectic enzyme, if needed
nutrient
Nottingham Ale Yeast
Rosehips and Lavender to taste for the secondary

Suggestions? Mr. Fey, what do you have in mind?

EverGreenman
03-26-2010, 02:45 PM
angelic alchemist you're probably going to want to up the amount honey on this.

robin hood would do things big... right? i mean, you've got the whole merry band of men to consider as well.

:icon_geek:

you would have to get a 5 gallon bucket of honey...
actually both you mentioned are great, get 5 gallons of each
go with 1:4 honey to water (so that's 40 gallons of water)
i would consider substituting some apple cider.

oak is a great choice. duir as druids of that time and location may have called it. it's considered symbolic of fortitude, and stoic nobility, yeah?
if you're gonna add the leaves to the mead,
actually, why would you add the leaves at all?
did i miss that? why not just age it on oak? that's the best way to get that roasted rounded smooth strong flavor!
if you want to do the leaves though... 55 handfuls all ripped and shredded. :thumbsup:
and since cocaine definitely did NOT grow in nottingham...
you should chuck some wormwood in for good measure. prepared properly... but you're an alchemist you understand. :hippy2:

you're fruits are great choices.
i'm sure they'd add as much as they could gather and chuck in.
so you should add as much as you can gather and chuck in.


Juice of crab apple, cherry and elderberry to taste
pectic enzyme, if needed
nutrient
Nottingham Ale Yeast
Rosehips and Lavender to taste for the secondary

all that is great. :iamwithstupid:

brew it up in a big ol' 50, 100 gallon vessel (no idea what they would have used back then but i'm sure there was something)

age in oak barrels!

ZachR
03-26-2010, 07:27 PM
I used Nottingham in my "malted apple mead" experiment, and it had no problem taking an SG of 1.100 to 1.010 (~12% ABV). It also had enough "oomph" to fully carb my bottles within 2 weeks, so be careful you don't underestimate the Notty ;)

Angelic Alchemist
03-27-2010, 01:11 AM
robin hood would do things big... right? i mean, you've got the whole merry band of men to consider as well.


oak is a great choice. duir as druids of that time and location may have called it. it's considered symbolic of fortitude, and stoic nobility, yeah?
if you're gonna add the leaves to the mead,
actually, why would you add the leaves at all?
did i miss that? why not just age it on oak? that's the best way to get that roasted rounded smooth strong flavor!
if you want to do the leaves though... 55 handfuls all ripped and shredded.
age in oak barrels!

I usually start small when I'm experimenting with a new recipe. I hate making large batches that don't turn out perfect - I prefer to make my mistakes on the small ones so I don't waste my ingredients/money. If this goes well, I'll make up a big batch for Sherwood Forest Faire next year - more like 5 gallons rather than 50. I'm not set up for that kind of capacity yet.

As for the oak leaves, I was following the suggestions on the thread. I've never used oak leaves in mead before and I'm always looking for something new, exciting, different, creative, mysterious, or just plain fun. I like seeing the looks on peoples faces when their eyebrows go into their hairlines as I tell them about some of the exotic things I've put in my meads. Oak leaves seemed neat. If the batch asks for oak aging, then I will do that too. Wormwood? Meh, I've been playing around with it quite a bit and I'm a little bored with the stuff. Been reading a book on healing beers and learning that even some of the more mundane herbs (sage, juniper, etc) can greatly enhance the intoxicating qualities of brewed beverages when applied correctly.

Speaking of mundane, does anyone know where to get crab apples or crab apple juice? All I can find is jelly! Do I need to just go into the woods and pick my own? When are they in season? Or can I just use the jelly and account for sugar content, then add some pectic enzyme?

wildaho
03-27-2010, 01:51 AM
Speaking of mundane, does anyone know where to get crab apples or crab apple juice? All I can find is jelly! Do I need to just go into the woods and pick my own? When are they in season? Or can I just use the jelly and account for sugar content, then add some pectic enzyme?
If you can wait until September, I have several live sources. March is not the time to harvest...

But I still have to say the crab apples will add a distinct tannic/tart note that may be overpowering. My very first cyser eight years ago was made with crab apples (one gallon of juice with 4 gallons of apple juice and 10# honey). It never got the chance to age (first batch!) but I'd still temper this ingredient or give it LOTS of age!

Wolfie
03-28-2010, 04:14 PM
A strong tart can be amazing balanced against a strong sweet. For something extremely sour I'd consider letting it land between 1.03 and 1.05. However all those big ingredients can equate to really big flavors as well.

I'm starting to puzzle out a recipe for this one too....I'll have to limit it mostly to what I can find here in Minneapolis though, shipping too many pricey specialty items can stop a batch in its tracks for me.


So for the oak leave recipe, do you think Nottingham ale yeast is okay? What about poison oak honey?

Call me crazy if you like, but I keep imaging a recipe for a Marionberry batch; sort of an "I made Marion" melomel. ;D
MEDSEN! THAT WAS AWFUL!
I'm tempted to go with it...

Angelic Alchemist
03-30-2010, 12:47 PM
If you can wait until September, I have several live sources. March is not the time to harvest...

But I still have to say the crab apples will add a distinct tannic/tart note that may be overpowering. My very first cyser eight years ago was made with crab apples (one gallon of juice with 4 gallons of apple juice and 10# honey). It never got the chance to age (first batch!) but I'd still temper this ingredient or give it LOTS of age!

Noted. Thanks for the friendly warning. Do you have a sugestion on how much crab apple juice would be right per gallon of must? 8oz? 4oz? What would good for a batch that is intended to be aged 6 months? 1.5 years? I'd like to have the batch ready for Sherwood 2011, but if I have to wait until the 2012 season that's okay too.

I may go with something really wacky for the time being (like putting crab apple jelly and pectic enzyme into an experimental batch) just to see what happens. Then, when I have a refined recipe hammered out (September-ish) I would certainly like to get hooked up with those sources of yours. Thanks for the help!

Medsen Fey
05-10-2010, 01:21 PM
I finally decided to make a metheglyn using oak leaves and rose hips, and I'll use Heather honey. I've started a brewlog in the Patron's area called Wood you do the Oakie-Pokie with Naughty Rosie? Aye Sherwood! (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php?p=142859#post142859) :D

Medsen Fey
05-10-2010, 01:57 PM
I ran across this Welsh Oak Leaf Mead Recipe (http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/cym/fetch-recipe.php?rid=gwin-dail-derw) called Gwîn Dail Derw
on celtnet.org.uk. This recipe used dried leaves so it is a bit different but could be used in the fall.

Dragonslayer
05-12-2010, 02:14 AM
I think you are all off. Given Tucks predisposition to beer it should be a Braggot not some sissy Meth or Sack. :icon_flower: I say buckwheat honey (I believe buckwheat was common at the time), heavy on the hops and rosehip for balance. That should just about make your eyes water! :'(

fatbloke
05-12-2010, 05:11 PM
It's all well and good that you lot want to "kick the arse out of it", but it would seem (certainly reads like it) that you're all suffering from over exposure to PR, advertisements and Hollywood :eek: (oooooh, listen to 'im, the heresy of the man......)

All you'd need now, would be to get the recipe made and then served up by either Alan Rickman (http://civilservant.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/sheriff-of-nottingham.jpg) or Keith Allen (http://www.bbc.co.uk/robinhood/characters/sheriffofnottingham.shtml)


Oh no, of course, they're nothing to do with Robin Hood either are they. They're "just" actors!

Ho hum!

regards

Sir Cumference......

Wolfie
05-13-2010, 06:34 PM
hmm I really like the ideas of heather, crab apple and braggot. I've seen some odd old (olde) recipes for beer that called for heather instead of hops and a cyser/braggot is not unheard of -- the ABC uses both cider and malt extract in addition to honey (btw-in the long haul mine came out great) the buckwheat could work in too. The oak leaves are the real oddball in the bunch, but might add some much needed bitter tannin. Suppose they could go in secondary? I cant see how fermentation would actually be crucial to making them.

sounds like a good fall recipe for me, thats when a lot of this becomes available for free 'round here.

for the kitche I suppose I'd use Nottingham ale yeast, though for the record I am really happy with the results I've gotten in beers so far and ale yeasts in old school mead(olde school meade) styles seems common enough (not that this is going to be a real period piece anyway, but lets just work from the stories right?).

But does anyone know the actual top abv of Nottingham?

**edit: on a side note: Dragons Lair, that sounds amazing, I'd love to see you really draw that recipe up pound for pound and ounce for ounce.

Wolfie
05-13-2010, 06:54 PM
I ran across this Welsh Oak Leaf Mead Recipe (http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/cym/fetch-recipe.php?rid=gwin-dail-derw) called Gwîn Dail Derw
on celtnet.org.uk. This recipe used dried leaves so it is a bit different but could be used in the fall.

Medsen-- taking a look at the recipe it looks like it uses nearly a kilogram of honey to a litre?

If I have this right this uses almost 9 lbs of honey to make a batch just over a gallon in size.

Please correct me if I'm wrong (after all I am a product of the public school system where such frivolous things as the metric system are not taught)

thanks in advance

/z

Medsen Fey
05-13-2010, 07:55 PM
Yeah, you're right. That must be typo or something because you couldn't ferment that much honey in 5 liters. I hadn't noticed that discrepancy.

Chevette Girl
05-13-2010, 08:44 PM
taking a look at the recipe it looks like it uses nearly a kilogram of honey to a litre?


...http://www.onlineconversion.com/ is a great place...


So considering that a kilogram of honey IS about a litre so you're looking at a total volume of 4 kg honey in 9 litres, definitely a bit much but not THAT outrageous when you consider that I use about 1.5 kg honey with about 2.5 litres water for 4 litres of JAO (I make it by the Imperial gallon!)... when I looked at the recipe I wondered too, but didn't care enough to crunch the numbers at the time. Wasn't sure if I'd want to decrease the honey to something sensible or dilute the whole amount to maybe 3 gal IMP (13.63 litres) afterwards... because for me, 1.333 kg honey per imp gallon total works just fine. I think even diluting it to 3 gal US would be acceptable, it's only about 2 litres different at that point.

I have a Welsh friend, I should ask her if she's ever had anything like this... :)

wayneb
05-14-2010, 12:53 AM
Honey is pretty dense compared with water, so the one liter per kilogram rule of thumb won't apply. One liter of honey (0.2642 gallons) weighs close to 1.4 Kg. (The mass of one liter of water is 1.0 Kg. The mass of one liter of an arbitrary liquid is 1.0 * the specific gravity of that liquid. The specific gravity of honey averages around 1.410) So, water is only 70% as heavy as honey. That 30% differential may not sound like much, but it means a lot when you consider the difference in specific gravity of a mead must. So, one kilogram of honey is only about 0.714 liters.


If one liter of honey weighed a kilogram (same as water), then the SG of 4 Kg of honey topped off with water to a total volume of 9 liters would be 1.000. In fact, 4 Kg of honey mixed with water to a total volume of 9 liters is actually closer to 1.130 in net specific gravity.

Chevette Girl
05-14-2010, 02:26 PM
<grin> I sit corrected, and I should know better than to eyeball volumes of anything but I was too lazy to go measure one of my 1 kg honey jars or go look up the density of honey to back-calculate, and couldn't measure the SG because none of my hydrometers go that high even if all my honey wasn't crystallized. Ya got me. Bad engineer. I am ashamed.

1 kg of the clover honey I get is about 700 +/- ml so my thumbnail calculation is off by 1.2 litres for 4 kg of honey. Bah.

Even still, with your calculations 1.130 isn't THAT outrageous, I've started a few things that high back when I had a hydrometer that went that high. I do know better now though! :)

Dragonslayer
05-14-2010, 09:06 PM
**edit: on a side note: Dragons Lair, that sounds amazing, I'd love to see you really draw that recipe up pound for pound and ounce for ounce.

Wolfie,

I actually have a rhodomel cookin' right now that is buckwheat honey and rosehip juice. First sip liked to rip my tongue right out of my mouth. :eek: Been in bulk age for a few months now and has become quite palatable. You can discern both the buckwheat and the rosehip. Just made a deal with my supplier for more buckwheat to make a big batch. I may conspire with one of my beer buds on doing a small test with some hops. I'll let you know.

Dragonslayer
05-15-2010, 04:45 AM
So, I just spent the last couple of hours actually creating a table to determine SG and potential ABV of a mead based on the water:honey ratio. I took one gallon of water at room temp and began adding honey one cup at a time. After each add (of course I mixed it well) I took a hydro reading. To reach the 1.130 Wayneb referred to a bit ago takes 7 cups or 5# 4oz to a gallon. Fermented to SG .99 would yield a 17%ABV.

The max you might want to go is probably a 4:2 ratio (4 quarts water:2 quarts honey). That's 6# to a gallon of water, which could get you a dry 19.5% ABV or more likely a nice Sack Mead.

Most of you already know this so I am not likely telling you anything new.

Chevette Girl
05-16-2010, 12:33 PM
So, I just spent the last couple of hours actually creating a table to determine SG and potential ABV of a mead based on the water:honey ratio.

That's a cool way to approach it, the only caution I have is that you'll have to account for the volume of the honey, it's not a honey:total ratio so you can't just add honey and top up with water to your desired finished volume. One more conversion!;D

Wolfie
05-17-2010, 06:30 PM
still a great way to go about it. I use a similar technique with cane sugar and water to give people a clue about what "sweet" means on the hydrometer when they are debating how to make a mead (people fret so over the first one don't they?)

on another note aside from the brewing calculator on this site there is a pretty cool mead calculator program at[url=http://home.comcast.net/~mzapx1/-high test's honey haven[/url] which I use often to reverse engineer recipes to abv or gravity.

Dragonslayer
05-22-2010, 10:33 PM
Medsen-- taking a look at the recipe it looks like it uses nearly a kilogram of honey to a litre?

If I have this right this uses almost 9 lbs of honey to make a batch just over a gallon in size.

Please correct me if I'm wrong (after all I am a product of the public school system where such frivolous things as the metric system are not taught)

thanks in advance

/z

One kilogram is 2.204 pounds (US) and there are 3.785 liters in a US gallon so that means the recipe is calling for 8.342 pounds of honey for a one gallon batch. Is that one gallon including the honey or one gallon plus the honey? Six pounds to a gallon (that's a gallon plus 6#) gives you an SG around 1.15 (19.5%ABV). If you could even get your yeast to work at 8.3#/gal that would be a serious sack mead. :p

Chevette Girl
05-23-2010, 12:45 AM
Is that one gallon including the honey or one gallon plus the honey?

For the oak leaf one (it intrigued me so I still have it open on another browser tab) it's 5 litres plus the honey, not including the honey.

Wayneb calculated it out to correct my ballparking, works out to 5 litres water (boiled with the oak leaves) plus 4 kg x .71 L/kg (=2.84 L) to give a total volume of 7.84 litres. Or thereabouts. I think your 19.5% ABV is probably about right.

Medsen Fey
10-25-2010, 09:30 AM
I never did make it to the theaters to see the Russell Crowe version of Robin Hood, but I rented it over the weekend and watched it. Frankly the movie wasn't all that great, but they get a big Huzzah for showing Friar Tuck as a beekeeper who offers mead to Robin's companions!

Good mead makes up for a lot of bad cinema. :)

AToE
10-25-2010, 01:46 PM
Yeah, I wasn't a huge fan of the movie, but the mead was a great touch. It might have actually been an OK movie if it weren't for me (and I assume everyone else) expecting a Robin Hood movie. If it had a different name, or had some kind of warning that is was a prequil to the usual story then I wouldn't have spent the whole thing waiting for the real story to start. :rolleyes:

Smarrikåka
10-27-2010, 08:35 PM
I just watched it, and kind of liked it. It brought something new, and not the same old story retold. Maybe a bit heavy on the gore (not unusual for a Russel Crowe film), and yeah maybe Robin Hood was the wrong title.

Concerning mead references, I think this might be the only movie to at least have attempted to get mead right. I don't really like that they used the word liquor to describe it though. I think they should have gone for something more verbose, like potent/wonderous honey concoction/beverage/elixir.