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Angelic Alchemist
04-21-2010, 02:04 AM
So I was doing some volunteer work this evening and a homeless man fainted during our prayer circle. I went into doctor mode, did the whole "My name is Angel, I'm trained in emergency procedures, I'm here to help you" bit, vitals, A&O, head to toe assessment, called the paramedics, etc.etc. I don't know what was wrong with the guy, though I can speculate, but that doesn't matter. Once he went in the ambulance it was up to currently practicing health care professionals to take care of that. I think he'll be okay, but I'm just weirded out by the experience.

I still notice that some people don't respect my expertise. If I tell someone to call 911, or not to give him water, or don't move him, it's for a good reason and because I know what I'm doing. But they gave him water, moved him and didn't call 911 until he started throwing up the water I told them not to administer to my patient.

Maybe it's because I'm so tiny, or female, or young. I don't know. I just get frustrated when people don't listen to me in situations where I know what I'm doing better than anyone else. Afterwards, there was no "thank you", no "nice job, Angel" or anything. We just went to dinner to unwind and forget the whole thing happened.

Well, tonight I can be grateful that I had dinner, and a place to unwind, and a safe home with a bed, and for my relatively good health. And I'm glad I didn't have to start CPR on the guy. I just hate starting CPR on people. The ribs always break and it's a stomach turning feeling when it happens.

Anyhoo, I just needed to vent at the pub and get that off my chest. It's way past my bedtime. Sorry for the personal nature of this post, but I don't think I can sleep with this stuff boucing around in my head and I don't think I can post this on my facebook profile without offending some of the people who were there when it all went down.

PitBull
04-21-2010, 07:44 AM
I still notice that some people don't respect my expertise.

Maybe it's because I'm so tiny, or female, or young. I don't know. I just get frustrated when people don't listen to me in situations where I know what I'm doing better than anyone else. Afterwards, there was no "thank you", no "nice job, Angel" or anything. We just went to dinner to unwind and forget the whole thing happened.

Well, tonight I can be grateful that I had dinner, and a place to unwind, and a safe home with a bed, and for my relatively good health. And I'm glad I didn't have to start CPR on the guy. I just hate starting CPR on people. The ribs always break and it's a stomach turning feeling when it happens.

Anyhoo, I just needed to vent at the pub and get that off my chest. It's way past my bedtime.
I am very sorry to hear of your experience. To many, youth equates to inexperience and ignorance, which is of course, not the case. It’s obvious who the ignorant really were in this situation.

Sleep well Angel, knowing you did all that was within your power to help somebody who was unable to help himself.

And, oh yeah… Thank you (very much)!

Medsen Fey
04-21-2010, 10:12 AM
Being female, youthful, and small of stature does make it challenging to give orders, even the appropriate and correct ones.

The only suggestions I can make are to use a loud and direct tone of voice and to single specific individuals out to do specific jobs - HEY JOE! Yes, Joe, YOU! Pay Attention! Grab a phone and call 911 now! - and so forth. Having a long stick is also good - Whack! Didn't you hear me? I said don't touch him. Yes, people will be muttering things like "what a bitch" afterward, but in the meantime maybe they'll do what is needed.

As for no appreciation.... well, at least the fellow isn't suing you for malpractice. Being under-appreciated goes with the territory.

But you did a good thing, so take heart.

Medsen

Dan McFeeley
04-21-2010, 11:25 AM
It's hard to say without having been there. Sure, being less than average stature can have an effect, on the other hand, I've seen too many short women, nurses, security guards, who are able to command respect. Sometimes grudgingly, but they get it.

It could have been that you had stepped into a role that the people around you weren't used to seeing, plus, in crisis situations people are going to tend to react more by reflex, rather than thoughtful consideration. You were acting according to training, everyone else saw you as the Shama they have always known, which may not include "doctor mode."

Only guessing, like I said, hard to say without having been there.

--

Angelic Alchemist
04-21-2010, 12:06 PM
Being female, youthful, and small of stature does make it challenging to give orders, even the appropriate and correct ones.

The only suggestions I can make are to use a loud and direct tone of voice and to single specific individuals out to do specific jobs - HEY JOE! Yes, Joe, YOU! Pay Attention! Grab a phone and call 911 now! - and so forth. Having a long stick is also good - Whack! Didn't you hear me? I said don't touch him. Yes, people will be muttering things like "what a bitch" afterward, but in the meantime maybe they'll do what is needed.

As for no appreciation.... well, at least the fellow isn't suing you for malpractice. Being under-appreciated goes with the territory.

But you did a good thing, so take heart.

Medsen

Yep, I did the name thing and the commanding tone - but it was "Mike" instead of "Joe" - and you're right. I get called a bitch all the time, and I left the world of health care after a 10 year career because I couldn't take all the corruption/bs. I'll look into getting that long stick. Do they sell them at the LHBS? :)

To all of you, thanks for the kind words. Sometimes being a leader means there's noone to give you a pat on the back for a job well-done. I know it's not about that at all, and that we help people simply because it's the right thing to do, but a little positive reinforcement really does help me keep going in life. I appreciate your attention.

wildoates
04-22-2010, 09:41 PM
Doing the right thing doesn't require the recipients to recognize that you did the right thing. You done good. Be at peace with that because that's why you learned how to act during an emergency, right?!

dr9
04-23-2010, 03:27 PM
When I think of a strange night doing volunteer work at the soup kitchen, it conjures images of a schitzophrenic using a plastic fork to stab the other schitzophrenic because the unicorn dread natty signed his pitty on the runny kine.

Angelic Alchemist
04-23-2010, 04:32 PM
Doing the right thing doesn't require the recipients to recognize that you did the right thing. You done good. Be at peace with that because that's why you learned how to act during an emergency, right?!

It wasn't the recipient's reaction that bothered me; it was the other volunteers! I mean, what part of "Mike, call 911" is unclear? What part of "Water is not a good idea right now, it's a choking hazard" do I need to elaborate on so that they will listen to me? And you KNOW if he had choked, it would have been up to me to reestablish an airway.

The man who fainted was mumbling something about what the demons said to him when he was walking here to Houston. I don't know what they said to him - he spoke so softly and the sound of the other volunteers failing at being useful was making my ears ring.

wildoates
04-23-2010, 11:40 PM
Sounds like those "helpful" people have never taken even the most basic first aid course!

Beave
04-24-2010, 12:42 AM
When I think of a strange night doing volunteer work at the soup kitchen, it conjures images of a schitzophrenic using a plastic fork to stab the other schitzophrenic because the unicorn dread natty signed his pitty on the runny kine.

Wow. This made me laugh 'till I cried.

.....signed his pitty on the runny kine.....

priceless!

Angelic Alchemist
04-24-2010, 05:04 AM
Sounds like those "helpful" people have never taken even the most basic first aid course!

Eh, no. The requirements for the work are minimal, and we still don't have enough help sometimes. I guess it's a good thing I was there, even though my ego had to take a spin through the chauvanist ringer. It's a small price to pay for someone's safety and well-being, if I look at the bigger picture.

dr9
04-25-2010, 11:27 AM
Wow. This made me laugh 'till I cried.

.....signed his pitty on the runny kine.....

priceless!

I can't take credit for that line. It's from Pootie Tang, the Chris Rock movie with the guy who does double-talk. Tons of stuff on youtube if you want hours of laughs.

dr9
04-25-2010, 07:18 PM
Wat a tie on the panty sty, sa da tay wit da pay no denny on the crowny town baby.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zltt3WY4Ws0