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Earthson
04-23-2010, 06:36 PM
After a couple "fly by the seat of my pants" batches of mead, I've definitely decided that I will do much better by taking good notes. YOU are probably reading this and thinking,"DUH!" :rolleyes:

Anyway, I found a BrewlogSet.pdf in the download section, which seems good. http://www.gotmead.com/index.php?option=com_docman&task=cat_view&gid=128&Itemid=448 But, I'm wondering if there are any other options? Any good downloads on the site for keeping track of the endless details that go along with making mead?

Thanks!

Angelic Alchemist
04-24-2010, 02:50 PM
I just use a boring old lab journal. I'm sure there are better ways, but I'm kinda old-school and minimalist (read: stubborn) when it comes to hobbies like this one. YMMV.

fatbloke
04-24-2010, 07:48 PM
After a couple "fly by the seat of my pants" batches of mead, I've definitely decided that I will do much better by taking good notes. YOU are probably reading this and thinking,"DUH!" :rolleyes:

Anyway, I found a BrewlogSet.pdf in the download section, which seems good. http://www.gotmead.com/index.php?option=com_docman&task=cat_view&gid=128&Itemid=448 But, I'm wondering if there are any other options? Any good downloads on the site for keeping track of the endless details that go along with making mead?

Thanks!
Nah! you'd not necessarily do better taking good notes. The only thing good note taking guarantees is that you can pretty well repeat the batch!

Personally I like to get ideas from here and other places, but that's where it stops - then it's the old fall back of "make it up as it goes"......

Brilliant......

regards

fatbloke

Earthson
04-24-2010, 07:54 PM
Geeze fatbloke...you're a bad influence ;D But, I have to admit, your words really speak to the lazy side of me...So, I'd better be careful, or I will just continue flying by the seat of my pants! LOL.

I actually follow your theory when cooking and it drives my wife NUTS. She'll love a dish and I won't even be able to tell her what went into it.

But, for mead, I will try to be a good boy. If I really hit a home run, I want to be able to duplicate it. ;)

AToE
04-24-2010, 08:03 PM
I use that brewlog that Wrathwild put together myself, I keep meaning to make my own, because there are a few changes I'd make, but it does the job well.

I don't think that record keeping in any way infringes on flying by the seat of your pants - it just keeps a record of what you did that made something great or something terrible for yourself. Plus, when it comes to asking for advice on these forums it's often critical to know exactly what you did.

skunkboy
04-24-2010, 08:10 PM
I just write down one batch per page in a lab book, and when I remember I put tasting notes on the back of the page later on...

Earthson
04-24-2010, 08:21 PM
Thanks everyone. I will just use a booklet like you guys said. Then it's all tidy and in one place.:)

Chevette Girl
04-28-2010, 07:29 PM
Initially I wanted to use a lab book like I was used to in school labs, but never got around to buying one, turns out the duo-tang I had kicking around with looseleaf was probably the best idea anyway! That way I can add in a page of comments from tastings and I can keep adding more pages at the end when I run out of room...

IMHO, I think the key points to record are start date, ingredients list and origins of ingredients (raw or bulk honey, fresh or frozen storebought or handpicked fruit, etc), procedures, starting Specific Gravity, then the date each time I do something to the batch (rack, check SG, remove fruit, add honey, etc), bottling date and final alcohol content. I also put comments on how it tastes or smells as I work. I like to know what I did so if it turns out tasting like diesel, I don't do it that way again, and if it's nectar of the gods, I can repeat it!

Did I miss anything you old pros would add?

I also learned the hard way after some confusion that a bottle tag indicating "Blacberry mead" also needs a start date if I've got three blackberry meads and a black raspberry one on the go, so now I use the lick-and-stick wine bottle lables from <gasp> kit wines to identify all my carboys...

skunkboy
04-29-2010, 08:30 PM
Instead of relying on a name and date to identify batches I started to use batch numbers a couple of years ago. So I keep Name, Batch Number, and Date on a paper shipping label on a string on the carboy while it is running/aging, and then I use Name, Batch Number, start date, and bottling date on the bottle labels.

saur0n
05-01-2010, 05:26 AM
I just chuck every bit of data in an excelfile.
I adds the pleasure of being able to see your gravity drop and your abv rise in an neat little graph ;D

Like skunkboy I number my batches rather than naming them. (Although my numbering might be considered as half-assed since I do not mention them on my bottlelabels. Just the starting month of the batch)

Currently I am fermenting Cyser 1.1 (yep. I'm a noob too) and Mystery Melomel 1.0 (haven't decide which fruit to put in secondary. I hope cherries will be available soon)

Later this week I'll start up Pyment 2.1 and JAO 1.3

Beeman2
05-01-2010, 05:52 AM
I also use a lab book and record the data people mentioned. I like using masking tape on the fermenters and carboys. Easy to transfer to new vessel when I rack.

Fisher kel Tath
05-01-2010, 10:02 AM
I just wish the PDF was editable (IE, being able to input the data on the form itself without writing)

mfalenski
05-02-2010, 07:56 AM
I create a text file and record all data to that for each individual recipe. Then I use DropBox and synch that folder online between three computers (work PC, primary PC, and brewing PC) so I can get access to it anywhere. I also have an Excel spreadsheet I keep gravity tracking results in that gets synched as well. I suppose I could move my process text to the Excel sheet, but then its harder to modify easily. Very simple now to add a date & details very quickly. I've tried brewing software like Beer Tools, but it does a pretty poor job of working with mead (but great for beer!)