PDA

View Full Version : Serving temprature



Fisher kel Tath
05-03-2010, 06:01 AM
First, I have no clue if this is the right place, but it works as good as any.

Was wondering, does aging have an effect on the serving temprature of mead?

My Cherry Blossom Green Tea(Green tea also contained cherry blossoms) mead, is already quite delicious if it's served slightly chilled to cold, but room temp and up it starts becoming fussy...

Smarrikåka
05-03-2010, 06:12 AM
In general I'd say that the "richer" the mead is, with highly developed taste/smell sensations, will "up" the ideal serving temperature. And since this "richness" tends to be something that comes with age, the ideal serving temperature would also be higher for older meads.

But if your mead currently goes cloudy/fussy at a higher temperature, that may be an unrelated notion to my generalisation, and may not change with age. At least more infomation would be needed to determine if it does or not.

Fisher kel Tath
05-03-2010, 08:40 AM
In general I'd say that the "richer" the mead is, with highly developed taste/smell sensations, will "up" the ideal serving temperature. And since this "richness" tends to be something that comes with age, the ideal serving temperature would also be higher for older meads.

But if your mead currently goes cloudy/fussy at a higher temperature, that may be an unrelated notion to my generalisation, and may not change with age. At least more infomation would be needed to determine if it does or not.

it doesn't go cloudy, more bitter like you really begin to taste the bad side of tea :P

akueck
05-03-2010, 11:45 AM
Probably too broad a category to say what the serving temperature of any "kind" of mead should be, much less how it changes over time. Serve it at the temperature you like best. If you find you like it warmer (or cooler) as it ages, so be it.

For me, in general, I find that the sweetness level is the best indicator of serving temperature. More sugar, lower serving temp. Of course, things like Port throw that notion to the wind as they can be quite sweet and I don't drink them cold. The whole dark/red vs. light/white spectrum also comes into play, with darker (for wine redder) things going higher in temperature and lighter (whiter) things served colder. I personally drink things warmer than most, so "please don't make it colder than this" for me is about 45 F (some dessert wines and highly carbonated beers), and most wine/mead/beer I like in the 60-65 F range, yes even white wine or pale ales. If one more bartender serves me beer in an iced glass, or wine from the 34 F fridge... :angry5:

Chevette Girl
05-03-2010, 11:40 PM
I agree with Akueck, there aren't really rules... Whatever temperature works for you is the right serving temperature!

I like all my wines and meads at room temperature. I find chilling dampens the flavour on most things, plus I can never be bothered to wait for a bottle of white wine to chill... and I only like my beer cold enough that they're still cool for the last mouthful because warm beer is gross :)

akueck
05-04-2010, 12:22 AM
and I only like my beer cold enough that they're still cool for the last mouthful because warm beer is gross :)

You're drinking the wrong beers. ;) If it tastes good warm and flat, imagine what carbonation and a small temperature drop can do!

Fisher kel Tath
05-04-2010, 07:39 AM
You're drinking the wrong beers. ;) If it tastes good warm and flat, imagine what carbonation and a small temperature drop can do!

probally ruin it.

My favorite beer is supposed to be served slightly below room temprature and in a brandy snifter :P

Medsen Fey
05-04-2010, 10:22 AM
For me, in general, I find that the sweetness level is the best indicator of serving temperature. More sugar, lower serving temp.

That surprises me. I find that sweet batches are best from about 65F up to room temp. I don't like cold dessert wines/meads.

akueck
05-04-2010, 03:18 PM
Hmm, that is funny. I feel like the sugar itself has less flavor and the acidity components are a little stronger at cooler temperatures. That said, I'll still drink those wines at room temperature. ;)

That settles it though, in case there were lingering doubts: there is no correct answer to the serving temperature question. Maybe we should give sake a nod and try our mead heated up?

d.j.patterson
05-04-2010, 03:36 PM
I have actually tried that! Heated up some Chaucers years ago to add the mulling spices. The spice bag broke so it never made it in.

I decided to just give it a run warm and see how it compared to cold and room temperature. I actually thought it was a lot better.

I didn't like the Chaucers at all cold or at room temperature, but warm it was rather pleasant. It seemed to bring out more of the honey smell and taste.

skunkboy
05-04-2010, 10:20 PM
I mostly make sack meads, and I usually prefer them to be about cellar temperature.

The few sparkling dry meads that I make about 40-50F, when opened.

This is of course to personal preference as the colder you go to more smell and taste elements you repress. One of the "local" breweries makes mead and serves it at almost freezing temperatures such that you can't smell or taste anything, which makes me wonder why they even bother. Although it is rather nice if you warm it up first, even if the bartender looks at you oddly cupping the wine glass in palms as you stare into the distance...