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Chevette Girl
06-03-2010, 02:56 PM
I thought it seemed pertinent...

http://comics.com/frazz/2010-06-03/

What DO you get if you feed your yeast with energy drink?

Angelic Alchemist
06-03-2010, 03:04 PM
??? Um, forgive me for getting technical (I'm not a beer maker) but are there any fermentable sugars left in beer once it's been brewed?

BadKarma
06-03-2010, 03:12 PM
To a certain extent, um, yeah.

Chevette Girl
06-03-2010, 03:30 PM
...although being a novice breadmaker myself there's not much difference that I've found in the quality of the fermentation from using beer instead of water for a dough, you usually prime your yeast with some sugar or it eats the fermentables in the flour if you're doing sourdough or not using the sugar, sugar just gives the yeast a kick in the right direction so you've got tighter controls on how long your rise will take.

MediaevalQuendi
06-03-2010, 04:17 PM
...although being a novice breadmaker myself there's not much difference that I've found in the quality of the fermentation from using beer instead of water for a dough, you usually prime your yeast with some sugar or it eats the fermentables in the flour if you're doing sourdough or not using the sugar, sugar just gives the yeast a kick in the right direction so you've got tighter controls on how long your rise will take.

As far as sugar is concerned, breads with sugar additions are usually enriched breads, and derive the flavour more from the enrichments (butter, milk, sugar, egg) than from the wheat. So the beer would be for taste and caramelisation, not necessarily for better fermentation.

With bread, generally, a faster fermentation does not result in better bread. Because dough is already such a nutrient-rich environment, nothing is really needed to "kick-start" the yeast; in fact, some would argue that the flavour development of the dough suffers when you intentionally quicken/enhance the rise. But, that's a whole can of worms, anyways. ;)

Besides the inherent flaws with the facts, its still an amusing comic :)

Medsen Fey
06-03-2010, 05:42 PM
??? Um, forgive me for getting technical (I'm not a beer maker) but are there any fermentable sugars left in beer once it's been brewed?

Very little fermentable sugar is left. There are loads of dextrins and a few other non-fermentable sugars, but the fermentable stuff if gone. Most beers don't even come close to the alcohol tolerance level of the yeast so the reason they stop fermenting is they run out of edibles.

akueck
06-03-2010, 08:14 PM
I'll add a caveat to that: some ale strains are "designed" to consume a narrower range of sugars, and so will leave behind some moderately complex sugars which can be consumed by some other yeast strains. Usually these are labeled "low attenuation" strains, which is misleading since attenuation depends on lots of factors and for most ales reaches 100% of what the yeast can access. So to answer the question "are there fermentable sugars left in finished beer?" I will answer: it depends.