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crimsondrac
08-03-2010, 12:15 PM
I understand the definition of a Show Mead is a mead made with nothing but Honey, water and yeast. Can not use any finings, fruits or spices or anything else. Does this include Yeast nutrient when starting the batch? I have read you need a pretty hardy yeast to make a mead without adding anything to it. Without a hardy yeast, you need to use a nutrient or starter for the yeast. Will using one break the definition of what a show mead is?

icedmetal
08-03-2010, 12:27 PM
If you add anything other than yeast, honey, and water, it's not a show mead. If you add only nutrients, it's a traditional.

To stick to the definition of show mead, I've read here about folks boiling yeast and using that as nutrient, and a few other tips and tricks. Just do a couple searches and I'm sure you'll find more information.

Medsen Fey
08-03-2010, 12:49 PM
In the "Oskaar in a Nutshell" (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php?t=10631&highlight=oskaar+nutshell) thread in the Patron's area, Oskaar gives a good outline on how to accomplish it. That thread alone is worth more than $25.

AToE
08-03-2010, 12:51 PM
Also you can just pitch a nuts amount of yeast to start. Whatever dies becomes food for the living, and they won't need to do as much reproducing to get to a good cell count to ferment, thus will need less nutrients.

Personally I think adding boiled yeast, though it technically is a show mead, is breaking with the spirit of a show mead (as it's essentially the same as adding store bought nutrients, just less YAN content), in my opinion only of course.

crimsondrac
08-03-2010, 04:33 PM
I will look into donating to get patron access but that may have to wait til payday. I was wondering though, I have read a few sites that talk about adding 1 packet of yeast every day for 4 days. Does this sound like overkill? They explain it as the first few packets of yeast will die and provide nutrients for the last two packets. The logic seems sound if you can also just add it all up front.

Medsen Fey
08-03-2010, 04:47 PM
You can do a large biomass yeast pitch or make a large starter, both of which can help get the job done (but neither of which is foolproof - there is data with winemaking that large biomass pitches can still leave a stuck fermentation late in the process sometimes).

Adding one packet a day for several days is probably not the best approach. The yeast will not die and undergo autolysis in 4 days; that may take weeks. So this means there isn't something for the new yeast to eat. The new yeast are being pitched into a low-pH must with alcohol that is likely to prevent them from multiplying and keep them dormant. You'd do better to pitch 4 packets on the first day - at least all the yeast will be able to wake up. Even then, that's not enough yeast for a true large biomass pitch; that would take about 5 grams per Liter.

AToE
08-03-2010, 05:08 PM
I was going to say, if anything it would be the later additions dying from shock, not the first ones pitched. I'd just add it all upfront, properly rehydrated.

mfalenski
08-31-2010, 08:54 PM
If you add anything other than yeast, honey, and water, it's not a show mead. If you add only nutrients, it's a traditional.

To stick to the definition of show mead, I've read here about folks boiling yeast and using that as nutrient, and a few other tips and tricks. Just do a couple searches and I'm sure you'll find more information.


What about adding oak to a show mead? I'm trying to figure out if adding oak will make it a traditional or if it stays a show. I realize you can ferment in oak, but I dont have a barrel, just chips, cubes, and spirals and thats kind of adding to it, isnt it?

Medsen Fey
08-31-2010, 09:11 PM
Oaking it means it is no longer a show mead (barrel fermented excepted)

AToE
08-31-2010, 11:43 PM
This is where the term becomes a bit goofy in all honesty, I think we've had some long and rambling discussions about this very topic.

mfalenski
09-01-2010, 01:39 PM
This is where the term becomes a bit goofy in all honesty, I think we've had some long and rambling discussions about this very topic.

I'm starting to see that.

I did find one discussion stating that if oak is added either by cubes, spirals, etc. or even just picking up oak from a fermentation vessel, it's no longer a show mead. Guess I'll just keep the oak out of the show mead. :)

AToE
09-01-2010, 01:45 PM
Personally I think that even fermenting/aging in an oak container takes away from what makes a show mead different than a traditional.

sce
09-01-2010, 02:43 PM
Is there an official name for a mead that is made with no added yeast, nothing but honey and water?

wayneb
09-01-2010, 03:44 PM
Unless there is exposure to airborne spores of "wild" yeasts during the mixing process or the water used is contaminated with yeasts somehow, a must consisting of only honey and water will not ferment. Generally speaking, unless you are really lucky and happen to get a good strain of wild or feral yeast in such a mix, it is safe to say that most folks would call it "swill." ;D

Seriously, there isn't an official term for such a mixture.

crimsondrac
09-01-2010, 03:56 PM
I am assuming you mean yeast you did not add yourself. Because whether you add the yeast yourself or whether it picks it up naturally from the environment, it is still considered added yeast. Do not think the fermentation can occur without yeast. To the best of my knowledge, there is no term for natural mead using only wild yeast. Not sure I would want to try that anyway. From what I understand, wild yeast can contain contaminates and can cause many off flavors. Not to mention that it could take much longer for a wild yeast to take hold in your must and you have no idea what else is landing in your must while you wait for some yeast to start growing.

Medsen Fey
09-01-2010, 04:19 PM
Is there an official name for a mead that is made with no added yeast, nothing but honey and water?


....unless you are really lucky and happen to get a good strain of wild or feral yeast in such a mix, it is safe to say that most folks would call it "swill." ;D


...or vinegar. :D

AToE
09-02-2010, 12:12 PM
Don't they call wines done that way "wild run" or some such? Of course, at a winery it's a somewhat questionable term, as there is probably so much domesticated yeast floating around in the air that they might as well be pitching their favourite strain.;)

I do plan on making a mead with wild yeast at some point (just a small batch as I know it'll probably not be very good), but I'll be chucking a berry from a nearby forest into it for yeast.