PDA

View Full Version : goblet, tankard or horn



calicojack
10-30-2010, 04:08 PM
what do you guys and gals prefer to drink your mead out of?

anyone ever tried a leather tankard?

AToE
10-30-2010, 07:24 PM
Someone started a thread about this same topic a week or two ago, most people said wine glass.

mesquite
10-30-2010, 07:28 PM
Someone started a thread about this same topic a week or two ago, most people said wine glass.

That thread is in the Patrons area.

wildoates
10-30-2010, 10:02 PM
You will get totally crocked if you drink your mead out of a tankard. :)

AToE
10-30-2010, 10:26 PM
That thread is in the Patrons area.

Was it? Whoops!

Anyways, wine glass is the way to go, mead isn't really a swill it from a tankard kinda drink (unless it's a braggot). I wouldn't drink white wine from a tankard or tea cup, etc, same with mead for me. It's really not a tough-guy drink at all. :)

Chevette Girl
10-31-2010, 01:46 AM
Clay mug or earthenware goblet, for what it's worth...

Tannin Boy
10-31-2010, 09:28 AM
You will get totally crocked if you drink your mead out of a tankard. :)

Ah! but what a way to go?

A wonderful 19th. Century American Sterling Tankard with lid!!!
Maybe I'll ask Santa....I've been a good boy this year, Well I think I have anyway?>:D

TB

YogiBearMead726
10-31-2010, 01:23 PM
I prefer basically any tulip shaped glassware. The reason being that the shape helps to funnel the aromas directly into your nose when you go to drink. Just my .02

Fisher kel Tath
10-31-2010, 01:59 PM
Horn. My drinking horn swallows a liter bottle with ease as well.

tycoon
11-02-2010, 09:54 AM
Yes, I started a thread on this topic a few weeks ago.

Myself, I prefer a sherry glass (an ISO glass would do fine too) for drinking a traditional mead, as I like mine slightly chilled. The sherry glass allows you to concentrate the smells in your nose, while the small amount of mead in the glass doesn't allow the mead to get too warm before you are done drinking it!

Anyway, I concur that any tulip-shaped glass should be fine.

Wassail!

dover157
11-02-2010, 12:11 PM
Lately I have been using a wooden goblet I made myself, but plan on making / using wooden tankards as soon as I get the tools for hollowing something that size. The goblet is pretty, but goes empty to often, is sometimes a long walk from the table back to the serving station.(plus a goblet just does not look right hanging from your belt.

calicojack
11-09-2010, 08:37 PM
Lately I have been using a wooden goblet I made myself, but plan on making / using wooden tankards as soon as I get the tools for hollowing something that size. The goblet is pretty, but goes empty to often, is sometimes a long walk from the table back to the serving station.(plus a goblet just does not look right hanging from your belt.

how's the wood handling the various flavors? does it absorb at all? i had thought about this as well.

Chevette Girl
11-10-2010, 01:28 AM
I do have a drinking gourd I made a long time ago (bought a dried gourd, cut the top off, used a bottle brush to get the seeds and any stringies out, then coated the whole inside with a few coats of beeswax), looks just fine hanging from the belt, I mostly don't use it often because I just don't trust the cork... but with the beeswax smell, it's very nice for mead.

I got my hands on a bunch of funny looking little gourds this year, they look like little green chthulus or something with tentacles, if I can get them to dry without going mouldy, I'm going to make drinking cups out of them.

akueck
11-10-2010, 02:38 AM
I got my hands on a bunch of funny looking little gourds this year, they look like little green chthulus or something with tentacles, if I can get them to dry without going mouldy, I'm going to make drinking cups out of them.

That description sounds either awesome or awesomely evil. Either way...

Mostly we drink mead or any liquid out of whatever is clean at the moment. A wine glass is most common for mead, but anything will do. Coffee mugs are nice, they come with handles.

jkane
11-10-2010, 11:36 AM
Depends on my mood! ;-)

If I am tasting and serious about determining the quality, a small brandy snifter that holds about 2-3 ounces works best.

If I am just drinking with friends, I use a horn. I don't seem to have any good pictures of it. This URL has a couple pictures. http://www.trubs.org/photo-gallery/category/67-june-2010-britt-and-heathers.html I am in the hawaiin shirt in the back. Horn gets lost in the shirt.


If I am at Beer/Mead camp, then it is the communal horn. This is the mead horn virgin initiation ceremony. This is not me. My initiation was before camera's were invented. There are no pictures of me drinking from it.
http://kane1.com/beercamp2009/DSC02828.JPG

If I am looking to have a really good time, I break out the BIG horn! ;D Darn ... I only have it as a picture on my computer. Need to stick it on a web page somewhere. MaybeI'll follow up later with it. It holds at least 3 liters!

I am at home, I have been known to open the keg tap and just pour into my mouth. Don't need no stinkin' glass! :p

I have been eyeballing wooden cups. Still haven't broken down and gotten one yet. Too many other things to drink out of already.

wayneb
11-10-2010, 11:53 AM
Lately I have been using a wooden goblet I made myself, but plan on making / using wooden tankards as soon as I get the tools for hollowing something that size. The goblet is pretty, but goes empty to often, is sometimes a long walk from the table back to the serving station.(plus a goblet just does not look right hanging from your belt.

You could try making a traditional mazer - picture a wide mouthed drinking "bowl" on a short, stubby base. These were some of the oldest ceremonial mead cups used in Northern Europe, and they can be made with matching lids (which were often ornamented with metallic filigree) for a really cool, elegant presentation. BTW - any tight grained wood (rock maple comes to mind) would be fine for use as mazer stock material, although turning a block of hard maple down to a relatively thin body wall thickness without chipping or cracking it can be a challenge.

And these traditional wooden drinking cups were often prepared for use by rubbing beeswax or other natural finishing materials into the wood, then polishing with a clean piece of fabric or fur. They really do look cool, and you could add significantly to your mead-geek rating by making and using one to quaff your own homemade product! ;D

tycoon
11-10-2010, 12:23 PM
I am not very convinced by wide-mouthed vessels, as they don't allow the concentration of the mead's bouquet. That's what the tulip-shaped glass is for. As mead has such a great bouquet, I think it is a waste to use wide-mouthed vessels.

In any case, I fully admit that the "atmosphere-enhancing" effect of drinking from horns, tankards, etc with friends might overcome the technical issue of the bouquet....It is a tradeoff

wayneb
11-10-2010, 12:27 PM
Personally, I agree with you, tycoon, but in the interests of historical completeness I thought I'd mention the mazer - and that is also why I personally don't like to refer to meadmakers as mazers. I am not a shallow wooden drinking vessel, although I have in the past been accused of being shallow and/or wooden at times.... ;D

calicojack
11-10-2010, 04:04 PM
let me preference my forth coming statement with this:
i've yet to taste mead. there's no place in my town to get it, hence the reason i'm making it.

that being said. the reason i took an interest in it is because of the vikings. therefore i guess i should consider myself a traditionalist. and "smelling" the mead as i drink it, no offense, seems a tad girly/yuppy.

tycoon
11-10-2010, 05:17 PM
Well, calicojack, if you are not interested in the bouquet of mead (or wine) I guess that there's no point in your investing in some Riedel, Spiegelau, etc fine lead crystal glasses.... I have spent quite a few quid on those over the years.

Myself, I am quite interested in the bouquet of my mead, as I think the "nose" of a wine makes an important part of the equation. I have only been brewing for less than a year, but the bouquet of the traditional mead batches I have made has been an important element in my motivation to keep brewing and learning. And having said that, I think I will start a thread about the bouquet of mead.

Wassail!

AToE
11-10-2010, 05:18 PM
Other than braggots, mead is kind of a girly/yuppie drink honestly, assuming one also considers wines to fit those descriptors. ;)

At it's most tough-guy mead is only about as tough-guy as a dry red or white wine, and most meads people make are more along the lines of a sweet rose wine or sweet white. I find it pretty comical actually when I explain to people what mead is, or give them a taste, and they have pictures in their heads of these big vikings (who were only one of a zillion cultures who did/do drink mead) drinking what is basically liquid candy-booze. ;D

Smell is a key part of taste too, and even with something like beer, stopping to take a whiff now and then can very much enhance the perception of the flavour.

I certainly don't mean to be down on anyone who'd rather drink mead out of whatever they want, be it a horn or a thermos, but as I think I already said earlier in this thread, I think people come into mead with some major misconceptions about what kind of drink it is.

EDIT TO ADD: As a "tough guy" myself, (Shaved head, big beard, muscles, heavily tattoo'd, big stretched ear piercings) I find a good trick to make it feel a little less yuppie to talk about is to use more common terms. I like to say "smell" or "aroma" instead of "nose" or so on, and taste buds instead of palate, you get the idea. It's not technically the best usage of the English language, but it does make one feel a little less goofy when saying these things outloud!

calicojack
11-10-2010, 08:16 PM
Other than braggots, mead is kind of a girly/yuppie drink honestly, assuming one also considers wines to fit those descriptors. ;)

At it's most tough-guy mead is only about as tough-guy as a dry red or white wine, and most meads people make are more along the lines of a sweet rose wine or sweet white. I find it pretty comical actually when I explain to people what mead is, or give them a taste, and they have pictures in their heads of these big vikings (who were only one of a zillion cultures who did/do drink mead) drinking what is basically liquid candy-booze. ;D

Smell is a key part of taste too, and even with something like beer, stopping to take a whiff now and then can very much enhance the perception of the flavour.

I certainly don't mean to be down on anyone who'd rather drink mead out of whatever they want, be it a horn or a thermos, but as I think I already said earlier in this thread, I think people come into mead with some major misconceptions about what kind of drink it is.

EDIT TO ADD: As a "tough guy" myself, (Shaved head, big beard, muscles, heavily tattoo'd, big stretched ear piercings) I find a good trick to make it feel a little less yuppie to talk about is to use more common terms. I like to say "smell" or "aroma" instead of "nose" or so on, and taste buds instead of palate, you get the idea. It's not technically the best usage of the English language, but it does make one feel a little less goofy when saying these things outloud!

http://likesirl.com/images/logo.png

AToE
11-10-2010, 08:25 PM
I will add that I have done some half-way extensive comparisons with beers and meads with different glasses, and the difference is impressive. Mead tastes much better (to me) out of a wine glass than a mug, pint glass, water glass, etc.

What I would like is some stemless glasses for when I have larger gatherings. Stems are nice to keep it whatever temp you started it at, but are a bit awkard at a party.

EDIT: will also add that I've never compared expensive glasses with cheap, just different shapes. Not sure what difference an expensive one would make other than colour, and overall strength/craftmanship.

Fisher kel Tath
11-10-2010, 08:40 PM
I will add that I have done some half-way extensive comparisons with beers and meads with different glasses, and the difference is impressive. Mead tastes much better (to me) out of a wine glass than a mug, pint glass, water glass, etc.

What I would like is some stemless glasses for when I have larger gatherings. Stems are nice to keep it whatever temp you started it at, but are a bit awkard at a party.

EDIT: will also add that I've never compared expensive glasses with cheap, just different shapes. Not sure what difference an expensive one would make other than colour, and overall strength/craftmanship.

Mead to me tastes funny when not out of the horn, just something is missing, but then my nose fits in the horn when taking a drink so you get a good whiff when drinking it.

I want to get some Belgian Goblets for beer, those had a short stem...

dover157
11-10-2010, 11:55 PM
how's the wood handling the various flavors? does it absorb at all? i had thought about this as well.

Have only used it a few times for some "red rum" provided by the pyrates at the first anual Battlemoor in colorado but seemed to hold up good. As long as you use a close grained wood and dont let a liquid sit in it to long (ya like that's a problem witnh mead) it should hold up fine.

jkane
11-12-2010, 10:46 AM
My big drinking horn for those times when 2 750ml bottles at a time just isn't enough. :eek:

http://www.kane1.com/justpics/halloween2009-2.jpg

havoc64
11-12-2010, 12:03 PM
Well I tend to use two different drinking vessels. If I am having a fun time and just goofing around with friends, I'll use a clay pottery/stoneware mug that I bought at the RenFest.
http://i688.photobucket.com/albums/vv249/havoc64/Mead/mug.jpg

If I am enjoying a nice reflective time, enjoying a fine Cigar or just want to enjoy both the boquet of the Mead, I'll use one of my Guinness pint glasses.

http://i688.photobucket.com/albums/vv249/havoc64/Mead/guinness-glass-toucan.jpg

Both the Pint Glass and my Mug enable me to have an ample amount of Mead to enjoy without having to visit the bottle again.. :)

Lastly Redstone meadery has some goublets that they designed specifically for mead..I'd be interested if anyone has tried them. I might just ask for some for Christmas, of course I'll have to have a couple of bottles of their mead..lol I am going to post a pic of their goblets for reference. I hope they and no one here minds. I do not work for the Redstone meadery or do I know anyone that does.

http://i688.photobucket.com/albums/vv249/havoc64/Mead/goblet.jpg

I think what it comes down to is choice of the individual who is drinking or serving mead. I don't want a dainty wine glass as I have big hands. I want something that I can sit down and not worry if it's the ground, concrete, wooden picnic table or the counter. That's my preference.

Enjoy!

Mike

Dan McFeeley
11-12-2010, 01:07 PM
I like the drinking horn -- is this the meadmaker's verion of the yard glass? ;D

My preference is function over form when it comes to mead or wine, even beer for that matter. I picked up one of Sam Adam's tasting glasses recently and it's really great for a good craft beer. Tulip wine glasses suit me for mead.

I also like the just for fun and relaxation stuff. I have a Ren-Faire mug, very nicely crafted with a dragon handle which I'll use for just about anything.

The Redstone Meadery glasses -- they look more like something meant for merchandising the meadery, but may also be suited for their Nectar meads? I understand these are low gravity melomels, well suited for a general consumer niche where there isn't much familiarity with mead.

The tough guy stereo type -- doesn't always work! ;D An ER doc who used to work with us before moving on to Indiana looked and sounded like what he's been for most of his adult life, a gym rat. Big guy, 224 lbs with not much left over from the muscle, tribal tatoo around a bicep. His Chicago city accent would slip out when he was stressed. Think his bench press was around 400 lbs. On the other hand, he was a hard core metro guy, into good food, cuisine at home, and good wine, something you wouldn't expect!

Don't knock the girly/yuppie meads too much, think another word for them is LPR. ;D

--

YogiBearMead726
11-12-2010, 01:58 PM
As to the Redstone glasses, they work well for a bar situation/for their meads, but I'm not terribly impressed by them.

Also, on taking a minute to sniff whatever you're drinking. You taste buds are very, VERY limited in their ability to taste different flavors. Around 90% of "taste" comes from what you smell. Your nose is a highly evolved appendage, that can detect and distinguish thousands of different scents.

So, while I understand that smelling your mead/wine may seem snobbish, but if you want the most out of your glass, you might reconsider your judgement about smelling before you drink.

calicojack
11-28-2010, 07:12 PM
got some smallish horns on the way. they are kinda ugly (in the picture) and need to be polished. so for now i'll drink from one and polish the other.

couldn't bring myself to spend $150+ on a wooden or leather tankard.

phreebyrd
11-28-2010, 10:33 PM
vikings were tough guys

jkane
11-29-2010, 04:53 PM
Where did you end up ordering them from?

It's been quite a few years, but when I went online shopping for horns, they were far and few between. Also, very expensive! I finally ordered one from a guy in Canada. He took my money and never shipped it. :-( I had a hard time getting pay pal to refund me. Ended up having to get my credit card company that I paid pay pal with to do it.

I ended up going to a local rennisance (spelling?) faire. They had a nice selection of drinking horns, and at a reasonable price too. They were also finished and ready for drinking.

The big horn I found at a voodoo shop in New Orleans. If you've been on Bourbon Street, you'd recognize the store. Bringing it back on the plane was an interesting experience. ;-) I don't think you could even do that now days! I had a hard time getting it cleaned out as it had all the flesh and stuff still in it. Dried, but still in it!

If you do make your own, check out EnviroTex Lite. It is a "food safe" epoxy. There is no such thing as "food grade" in epoxies, so food safe has to do. They use it in bars for the counters and such. Anyhow, is is a mess, and takes a long time to set up, but it will slowly coat the inside and make a cleanable surface if you don't want to have the horn in contact with yoru drink. I spun the horn for half an hour slowly while it dried. Kept it from flowing to one side or down to the bottom.

Medsen Fey
11-29-2010, 06:15 PM
The big horn I found at a voodoo shop in New Orleans... I had a hard time getting it cleaned out as it had all the flesh and stuff still in it. Dried, but still in it!


I'm all for drinking horns, but I'd encourage anyone finding one with flesh still in it to be very careful. Even dried, it can contain some nasty things like spores of Anthrax which can be found in cattle. Handle with caution.

jkane
11-29-2010, 06:29 PM
I scraped and bleached it. It cracked as it dried. I bleached it too long! :-( That is why I used the EnviroTex Lite to seal it.

calicojack
11-29-2010, 10:53 PM
ebay of all places. i did a search for "drinking horns" which turned up several "pretty" horns ranging from $10-$99. then i did a search for cow horn

this (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rt=nc&nma=true&item=220699567967&si=T8WOPi9cu1HfO6NRw0ZqRs3eZ9Y%253D&viewitem=&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWNX%3AIT) is what i ended up getting, mostly cause it was like $10.75 shipped for the pair.

Golddiggie
11-29-2010, 11:00 PM
Amazon has some too... $55-$65 http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dgrocery&field-keywords=drinking+horn&x=0&y=0

Chevette Girl
06-15-2011, 12:45 AM
I got a drinking horn for my birthday! I'm going to seal it with the same beeswax I used to seal my drinking gourd.

I swear this thing's from a Texas Longhorn or something, I bet it holds more than a litre!! It's been cleaned out already, doesn't smell at all, and the edges are a little thin and starting to delaminate a bit at the edge (kind of how my fingernails split and peel) and I figure if I make a lip with the wax that should protect it...

fatbloke
06-15-2011, 07:23 AM
Not interested in period costume fayres and such events. So a wine glass for red wine (short stem), or what the hell, a paper cup..........

beeboy
06-17-2011, 09:17 PM
I have been using a small sterling silver whiskey glass, it only holds about 4-5 oz as my main drinking vessel. It keeps the bottle from emptying too fast and allows a good aroma from the mead. It is also kinda cool to sip mead out of a silver cup. I also have a silver tankard that holds about 12 oz but it is an old family piece and it is tucked away somewhere safe. I made a drinking horn a few years ago from a small cow horn that holds around 9-10 oz and painted the inside with food grade epoxy paint which was left over from painting the inside of my honey extractor. The horn is kinda cool looking with a piece of Y shaped deer antler glued to it as feet. I covered the glue joint with a turks head knot made out of leather thong so it looks like the antler is tied onto the horn. I only break it out for full moons, successful honey harvests or sacrifices on the grill. My more conventional mead glasses are wine glasses with a stem or a small brandy snifter. I try real hard not to drink straight from the bottle, it just does not seem right.

TheAlchemist
06-17-2011, 09:32 PM
I like drinking mead from a Champagne flute...

Would love to see photos of CG's and BeeBoy's drinking horns...

Guinlilly
06-17-2011, 09:50 PM
For me it's wine glasses if at home, horn if at festivals and during ritual/sumbel.

Chevette Girl
06-18-2011, 01:46 AM
I like drinking mead from a Champagne flute...

Would love to see photos of CG's and BeeBoy's drinking horns...
Mine doesn't look like much, simple leather cuff with thong for tying to a belt, it's just a lot bigger than I've seen on any living cow I've ever encountered... this's more the size of the pair on Boss Hogg's cadillac... and although I generally drink out of wine glasses, I don't yet have any safe place to keep them in the basement where all the mead is, so I've been pulling a Gibbs (NCIS) and drinking out of a mason jar...

Oskaar
06-18-2011, 08:12 PM
I drink mead from wine glasses. I just never enjoyed drinking from a horn or a mazer unless I was too buzzed to care about the aromatics and such. No slam on horns, mazers, mugs or any other drinking vessel. I just like wineglasses better.

My stems with what I generally drink out of them.



Cheers,

Oskaar

storm1969
06-19-2011, 12:40 AM
interesting collection, Oskaar.

Home goods is your friend.... Just picked up twelve Marquis by Waterford Vintage collection Cab glasses for 40$.

Now where to store them...

I have a bit of a collection of wine glasses. I like crystal glasses for drinking wine and mead. Being a bit of a klutz I break them on a fairly regular basis so my collection has a constantly changing makeup. (plus I can't seem to stop buying them.)

Cheers, Brian

wildoates
06-19-2011, 02:08 AM
That's my problem, too--where to put things. My kitchen is overstuffed as it is.

Nice selection of glassware, though, Pete. Makes me embarrassed about mine. :)

Chevette Girl
06-19-2011, 02:14 AM
That's my problem, too--where to put things. My kitchen is overstuffed as it is.


I'm a packrat by nature so I eventually had to start a kitchen purchases rule - prior to a new purchase, I must consider the following: if it doesn't already have a home, I must remove something to make room for it. of course, this has led to a box of seldom-used large kitchen items like the giant roasting pan and the 2 extra stock pots being stored in the basement where the wine's supposed to go...

Mmm, I love my crystal stemware, and thankfully it's rather on the heavy side or I'd never use it for fear of breaking it... too many options!

calicojack
01-08-2012, 11:28 PM
Just finished this up today. Thanks to gunlilly and brimminghorn for inspiration on this.

Engraved with dremel 105 and 106 engraving bits. Inked with a paint pen (which bled a little). Sealed with local beeswax and then polished with a terry cloth and lots of elbow work

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/401680_358057067544915_258293964187893_1619278_160 9541744_n.jpg

skunkboy
01-09-2012, 12:36 AM
Wow, very nice...

TheAlchemist
01-09-2012, 12:21 PM
Beautiful!

Tobinobin
01-09-2012, 08:26 PM
My friends and I bought drinking horns...now I know most mead that is made is the same percentage as wine, and is drank almost as a fine wine. Are there any recipes for lower AV mead that can be drank in larger quantities?

Soyala_Amaya
01-09-2012, 09:59 PM
Certainly, use the exact same ingredients with less sugar and a yeast with a lower ABV. There was a thread not too long ago "Lowest ABV you've fermented and been happy with" and I know there were some comments about meads at 7-8%. I'd use a beer yeast and measure my sugars correctly to make a hydromel.

And as for calicojack, very nice horn work. I'll eventually work on carving my big one, the only one I've ever worked on was too thin for a rotary tool, so I actually used a wood burning iron. Gave it a cool brown color, but smelled like burnt hair. :( My boy does really nice cane work though, so I may make him do it. :)

calicojack
01-10-2012, 12:04 AM
i highly encourage you to do your own horn. for me it is part of my journey to find my heritage and path in asatru, so there is a lot of personal satisfaction in this accomplishment.

i can set you up with a good vendor that takes "offers" on their horns. This one was 4 inches wide at the mouth and 17 inches long. I paid $15 shipped for it.

Soyala_Amaya
01-10-2012, 12:11 AM
I get my horns raw from a local leather shop and make them myself. Up till this point, it's been a learning experience with finding one that 'fit my hand' and polishing and curing. It also left me with some nice hand made gifts for various friends I've made. :D

I just tend to have issues with rotary tools, I can almost never get a straight line, at least on wood. And I am rather in love with my latest horn (it holds almost a full 22 oz bottle), and I already made a horn frog for it...so I don't want to mar it and not want to use it anymore.

TheAlchemist
01-10-2012, 01:29 PM
i can set you up with a good vendor that takes "offers" on their horns. This one was 4 inches wide at the mouth and 17 inches long. I paid $15 shipped for it.

More info, please.

calicojack
01-10-2012, 03:50 PM
here (http://myworld.ebay.com/wildlife_ranch&ssPageName=STRK:MEFSX:SELLERID&_trksid=p3984.m1543.l2533). ive paid $15 ea for my last two

JackFrost
01-15-2012, 03:12 PM
The way you drink mead reflects who you are and how you see yourself. Me,? I prefer my mead iced down in a pint glass. Or perhaps in a sampling glass for whisky.! It is your mead... drink it any way you please.

JF

TheAlchemist
01-16-2012, 08:35 PM
I use a champagne glass...

veritas
01-16-2012, 08:48 PM
Whatever is near by. Usually a wine glass at home inside. A horn or large mug outside. I do most of my larger volume drinking outdoors!

PirateNigel
01-19-2012, 08:25 AM
I've been using a CarsŪ child's cup for tasting while I am brewing or making wine or mead.

But for drinking it's generally a wine glass but I've drank out of many vessels. Solo cups, horns, goblet, tankards,straight from a bottle you name it I've probably drank mead out of it. It barely counts as mead what we were drinking but with a name like 'Camelot Mead', we thought we were cool. Wine glasses never seemed to make it to the camping exhibitions.

Soyala_Amaya
01-19-2012, 12:30 PM
Just ordered a new horn as an Ostara gift for my guy. All rough and nasty, can't wait till it gets here and I can start polishing! Then I get to cure it, which is kind of a waste of lager, but I use cheap stuff, lol. I'll post pics in 3-4 months, yknow, when it's done. ;D