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View Full Version : How much Yeast for a 1 gallon batch



Gavin
12-20-2010, 11:05 AM
Hello all,

I am brand new at mead making and i have just started my first ever batch, I have a quick question though, something that I could not find, or got mixed results from when reading various websites.

I am making a 1 gallon batch with Lalvin D 47, but how much of the 5g pack should i have used? I have seen videos on you tube where people are putting a full 5g in, but I have read on websites to only use 1/5 of the packet (1g)

So i decided to split the difference and use about 2.5g.

Is this going to have an adverse affect on the batch? Is the amount of yeast a personal preference?

Thanks in advance :)

Gavin

Medsen Fey
12-20-2010, 11:18 AM
Welcome to GotMead Gavin!

Although most folks around here will probably use the whole packet (5 grams), since they only cost about $1, it is more yeast than is required. 1 gram would be adequate; using 2.5 grams will be fine. Just make sure to aerate the must (gently so it doesn't erupt) to allow the yeast to grow to their maximum potential.

Since you've received some conflicting advice, feel free to post up the details of your recipe and we can help to make sure you are starting with a good plan. Also, be sure and check the NewBee guide (linked in the column to the left) as it is full of good information.

Golddiggie
12-20-2010, 12:58 PM
I think most people would pitch the entire packet in (myself included) unless they had an immediate use (or really, really soon) for the balance of the yeast packet.

I think it makes more sense to use an entire packet of dry yeast than to have a half packet in the fridge for who knows how long. Unless you plan to boil it up for yeast food.

I pitched an entire packet of EC-1118 in my 1 gallon PoR mead. I don't think it will do any harm to pitch more yeast into a smaller batch size. You could run into difficulty if you pitch too little yeast into a batch size though.

YogiBearMead726
12-20-2010, 02:53 PM
I think most people would pitch the entire packet in (myself included) unless they had an immediate use (or really, really soon) for the balance of the yeast packet.

I think it makes more sense to use an entire packet of dry yeast than to have a half packet in the fridge for who knows how long. Unless you plan to boil it up for yeast food.

Given proper storage practice (ie vacuum sealed and refrigeration), yeast can remain viable for quite some time. Even in less than ideal conditions (ie ziplock baggie in the fridge), you could probably still have viable yeast after the 1 year mark. I feel like Lalvin answers this issue either in it's FAQ or maybe a correspondence I remember Medsen posting on the subject of saving yeast cultures. I'll look for the info.

Edit: I checked the FAQs. They recommend either freezing with glycerin or vacuum sealing. The freezing seems to be for after fermentation to preserve a culture, vacuum sealing for saving the dry yeast. They also say to use un-used yeast within a week to ensure viability, but so far, I haven't had issue using yeast that's a few months on that's been stored in ziplocks in the fridge...YRMV, but if you're worried they won't be viable, make a starter, and you'll find out. ;)

I will agree though that I like to use a larger bio-mass at pitch to ensure fermentation is done quickly and efficiently. This will be especially true for higher gravity musts. Though, technically, you could achieve similar bio-mass from just 1g of yeast built up as a starter culture for a few days, then pitched in.

On a slightly off-topic note, I just read the thread about the amber-trapped yeast being made into beer. Yeast are quite hardy! :) Sorry for the off-topic comment... :p

wayneb
12-20-2010, 05:07 PM
FWIW, I have used active dry yeast from opened packets that were subsequently sealed in ziplock bags and stored at normal refrigerator temperatures (not frozen), for up to three years after the initial opening with no issues. But we do live in one of the drier climates in N. America, so with different average relative humidity values in different parts of the world, YMMV.