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TDMooney
02-02-2011, 06:59 PM
So I just joined my local Beekeeping Association, Howard County Beekeeping Association. It was $10 to join and they meet the second tuesday of every month. I also Signed up for a beekeeping class provided through the Assoc. It was $40 to register and you have 5, 2.5 hour classes in the class room and 1 field day to go to a local apiary and help with hive maintnence and honey extraction, I also will recieve a textbook on the first day of class. I am very excited to meet local beekeepers in my area and form relationships so that I can use local honey in my mead and hopefully be able to start my own hives in 2012. I also talked to the president of the Assoc. over email and she said that she could probally be able to find some volunteer work for me at local apiaries over the spring and summer so that I can get more experience before starting my own hives. ;D

icedmetal
02-02-2011, 08:22 PM
Right on! The more beeks, the better :)

This'll be the second year of my wife and I keeping a hive. It's totally fun, and freaks out the neighbors too ;D We just signed up for a class as well so we can learn more specifics about keeping bees in our immediate area.

TDMooney
02-02-2011, 08:36 PM
Awsome ! I can't wait to start my hives next year, the class outline is

1.) How to get started
2.) Honeybee Biology
3.) Beekeeping Equipment
4.) Colony Management
5.) Pollination and Dealing with Pests and Diseases

The clases are held on 2/22 , 3/1 , 3/8 , 3/15, and 3/22 .. the field day is in april but the date it still pending.

I may start a blog with all of the notes and things that I have learned throughout the course and monthly meetings.

hillhousehoney
02-05-2011, 04:33 PM
love beekeeping. Since you will be attending a beekeeping club, you will likely be hearing about one way to keep bees. Keep an open mind and understand that there are several ways to keep bees. No one has the corner on the market. It can get very involved, if you don't do a little research ahead of time. If you haven't found it yet, go to "bushbees" on the net, there you will find a wealth of information. He, along with many other (including myself), keep bees without chemicals. This way the poisons don't get into the honey. Just another thing to be made aware of. I wouldn't keep bees if I used chemicals. Now I thououghly enjoy beekeeping because it's no longer work. Just want to make you aware of your options before you make your choice about how you want to keep bees.

TDMooney
02-05-2011, 05:16 PM
thank you, I will definetly look into bushbees ... hopefully the class I signed up for will go over chemical-free beekeeping techniques , I really cant wait until next year when I finally start.

Chevette Girl
02-06-2011, 01:11 PM
I may start a blog with all of the notes and things that I have learned throughout the course and monthly meetings.

Oh, please! I'd like to see what's involved and also what the other beekeepers think of it!

gray
02-06-2011, 01:55 PM
I would think a blog would be a wonderful idea if you have the time. Do you know what book you will be given?

TDMooney
02-06-2011, 11:49 PM
I will definetly be making a blog, and as of right now I'm not sure of the book that they are giving to the students, but I will try and figure that out at the meeting on tuesday.

randrick
02-07-2011, 12:25 AM
I encourage you to blog your honeybee experience. I kept decent paper notes and I blogged (to some extent) my first year bee keeping experinces at www.rayandrick.com. I look forward to reading about your first year experiences.

TDMooney
02-07-2011, 01:09 AM
just read your blog on honey bees on your website, very interesting and fun to read ;D

Tannin Boy
02-07-2011, 06:40 AM
love beekeeping. Since you will be attending a beekeeping club, you will likely be hearing about one way to keep bees. Keep an open mind and understand that there are several ways to keep bees. No one has the corner on the market. It can get very involved, if you don't do a little research ahead of time. If you haven't found it yet, go to "bushbees" on the net, there you will find a wealth of information. He, along with many other (including myself), keep bees without chemicals. This way the poisons don't get into the honey. Just another thing to be made aware of. I wouldn't keep bees if I used chemicals. Now I thououghly enjoy beekeeping because it's no longer work. Just want to make you aware of your options before you make your choice about how you want to keep bees.

HHH,

I was low on my honey reserves, so off to the public market!
I asked the bee keeper about the chemical issue and he agrees and
said he had stopped using chemicals several years ago and was quite
pleased that he had. I asked about the mites and his reply was not much
different results with or without the chemicals:)

TB

TDMooney
02-07-2011, 12:13 PM
going to the first meeting tomarow (not class just a monthly meeting) and I think the topic of discussion is actually on mites !

chams
02-07-2011, 10:31 PM
Can you keep a colony if you are only there once a month?

hillhousehoney
02-07-2011, 10:32 PM
that as well about mites. Some going chemical free still fight those little bugs. I have also introduced small cell (4.9) in my hives, and I really don't count mites anymore, but rather let them co-exist with the bees. It's good to hear about others going off chems. The honey does taste different. I did a talk for a local ladies group and gave them a sample right off the frames out of my hives. They became customers immediately. (That was my plan! Haha);D

Timothy

TDMooney
02-07-2011, 10:57 PM
Can you keep a colony if you are only there once a month?

What I've heard is that beekeeping is more work then owning a cat and less work then owning a dog

tweak'e
02-08-2011, 12:12 AM
for a hobbyist beekeeping is sweet stuff all work. however what catches out a lot of hobbyists is they put off doing what needs to be done. by the time they get around to it, its to late. timing is everything.
you will spend less hours on the bees over the year than you do feeding the cat.

if your new to beekeeping i would suggest steer clear of anything organic, chem free, etc. you need to learn to be a beekeeper first. once you are a good beekeeper then you can play with all the different theories around.
i see a LOT of people wanting to be "green, organic etc" beekeepers. however they typically fail a lot and they do not know how to recover and do not work out what was at fault. ie was it their beekeeping skills at fault or did they do the organics side wrong ?
they will blame whatever and buy a new hive in. i've seen numerous "organic" beekeepers buy in hives year after year .....and some even have the balls to claim their methods work !
their problem is typically poor beekeeping rather than anything else.
so learn to be a beekeeper first!

i highly recommend go spend time with a commercial beekeeper. the simply problem with being a hobbyist is it takes such a long time to learn things. eg if you have 2 hives you only get to do certain things 2-4 times a year. in 30 years thats only 60-120 times you get to do it. with a commercial beekeeper you might do that job 60 times a day.

hillhousehoney
02-08-2011, 06:02 PM
and I quote "they will blame whatever and buy a new hive in. i've seen numerous "organic" beekeepers buy in hives year after year .....and some even have the balls to claim their methods work !
their problem is typically poor beekeeping rather than anything else.
so learn to be a beekeeper first!

Organic beekeepers are true beekeepers! You can use chems if you wish, I never said you couldn't. I have been into bees for over 4 years now. My bees live through winter, and I have little to no mites in my hives. I make splits and catch swarms to diversify my gene pool. I pay great attention to detail, that's why I'm successful. And my honey is clean!!!

kudapucat
02-08-2011, 09:12 PM
My dad is a hobbiest, and has 3 hives.
He has suggested to me that if I wanted I could have my own hives and use his gear. Only the farm is 200km distant (120 miles)

So my question is this: can I remove the combs, replace with empty frames and then take them up bush still sealed in wax (when it's convenient) and extract them then? (preferably when dad's processing a flow, to save set up and clean up time?

The only problem I can see with this, is temperature regulation. Without the bees to keep the honey warm, it may crystalise.
I have NFI about beekeeping. Is this a valid concern?
Does anybody else have any ideas?

how long will a comb full of honey store on the frame?

TDMooney
02-08-2011, 10:56 PM
Jus got back from the meeting, I will be creating the blog tonight, the meeting went over mostly Small Hive Beetles (SHB) but some general information was covered as well. Look for the blog tonight (under my blogs), that is were all of the information I gather will be written

TDMooney
02-08-2011, 11:56 PM
The information is now posted to my blog under the Howard County Beekeepers Association folder and the blog is February Meeting. Please read over it, there is alot of really good information and links on Small Hive Beetles.

Thanks ! :)

tweak'e
02-09-2011, 02:01 AM
Organic beekeepers are true beekeepers!
absolutly ! i couldn't agree more.


You can use chems if you wish, I never said you couldn't. I have been into bees for over 4 years now. My bees live through winter, and I have little to no mites in my hives. I make splits and catch swarms to diversify my gene pool. I pay great attention to detail, that's why I'm successful. And my honey is clean!!!

sounds excellent.

however my point is that people need to learn how to walk before they can run. i find a lot are often they are more interested in being "green" rather than being interested in bees and they try to sprint a marathon before they have learnt to walk. end result lots of dead hives which is just not sustainable.
for eg i've lost count of the amount of people who have said "my hives don't have mites" then later on the hives are dead from varroa. (remember i'm in NZ so things are a bit different).



My dad is a hobbiest, and has 3 hives.
He has suggested to me that if I wanted I could have my own hives and use his gear. Only the farm is 200km distant (120 miles)

So my question is this: can I remove the combs, replace with empty frames and then take them up bush still sealed in wax (when it's convenient) and extract them then? (preferably when dad's processing a flow, to save set up and clean up time?

The only problem I can see with this, is temperature regulation. Without the bees to keep the honey warm, it may crystalise.
I have NFI about beekeeping. Is this a valid concern?
Does anybody else have any ideas?

how long will a comb full of honey store on the frame?

unless you have a quick crystallizing honey you can pull the honey off the hive, store it (so no other pests can get into it) and then extract later.
some people pull all their honey off during the season, store it, then extract over winter.

honey will crystallize in the frame just like it does in the jar. being in the hive makes little difference. we have some honey over here that crystallizes so rapidly we have to take the honey off the hive very quickly otherwise it sets and you can't get it out of the comb.

randrick
02-09-2011, 02:07 AM
My dad is a hobbiest, and has 3 hives.
He has suggested to me that if I wanted I could have my own hives and use his gear. Only the farm is 200km distant (120 miles)

So my question is this: can I remove the combs, replace with empty frames and then take them up bush still sealed in wax (when it's convenient) and extract them then? (preferably when dad's processing a flow, to save set up and clean up time?

The only problem I can see with this, is temperature regulation. Without the bees to keep the honey warm, it may crystalise.
I have NFI about beekeeping. Is this a valid concern?
Does anybody else have any ideas?

how long will a comb full of honey store on the frame?
Still good honey has been found in the tombs of Egyptian pharohs! Both honey and beeswax are very, very stable. If the comb is capped (the bees covered the top with wax) it should keep for a long time. As for crystalizing, there are two main sugars in honey fructose and glucose. When the fructose to glucose ratio is high (think tupelo), the honey won't crystalize. Even if the honey does crystalize, you can warm the honey and the crystals will redisovle. What you're suggesting shoudl work. You may also want to consider extracting the honey form the frames on-site, then take the honey home in buckets. The bees with appreciate the empty comb. They'll fill it quickly.

tweak'e
02-09-2011, 03:02 AM
i've never tried heating the honey to melting point while in the comb. not sure how you would go seperating the melted wax from the honey. of course rewaxing the combs would be a pain (unless useing plastic frames).

i know some people that extract on site but thats useing plastic frames and they scrap everthing off the frame, then seperate the wax from the honey later on.
not something i would do out side of honey flow ie robbing time.

kudapucat
02-09-2011, 08:47 AM
OK, general consensus is I could store the frames for a few months, take them up bush to the extraction gear when dad's processing a flow then extract, and bring the buckets of honey home again to make mead?
Does this sound right?
This is my ideal solution. It means the least work for me.

hillhousehoney
02-09-2011, 12:25 PM
Yes, I am familiar with your beekeeping situation there. As you have explained, then I fully understand what you are saying and it makes sense. Thanks for explaining your position.
Timothy

Tannin Boy
02-09-2011, 06:21 PM
that as well about mites. Some going chemical free still fight those little bugs. I have also introduced small cell (4.9) in my hives, and I really don't count mites anymore, but rather let them co-exist with the bees. It's good to hear about others going off chems. The honey does taste different. I did a talk for a local ladies group and gave them a sample right off the frames out of my hives. They became customers immediately. (That was my plan! Haha);D

Timothy

Tim,

Great to hear of your sales success's, that is the best way to make new customers too.... My bee keeper has also learned as I have found with
other chemical use that to continue the pests diet of the same chemicals
will only cause the pests to build up their immune systems to resist the constant use of the same chemical? Sounds like we are chasing our tails when using the stuff. I like your thoughts about keeping a neat house for your little guys and paying attention to their needs. I wish you the best of luck with your business for the future. We need more folks like you doing your best to insure the health and future of your bee's and the quality food supply that it brings to our tables!

Carl
P.S. What is your favorite type of honey and why do you prefer it?

beeboy
02-09-2011, 10:54 PM
I'm not sure you should store the full frames of honey off of the hives. You are asking for wax moths to move in and destroy everything. You also need to watch out for small hive beetles, they will slime and trash the honey comb in about a week. The only safe way I know to store honey still if the frames is either on the hive or cold enough to keep out the pests. I lost a hive to SHB two years ago and it was ugly. Ask about wax moths and SHB at your club. Welcome to bee keeping it is a blast

TDMooney
02-09-2011, 11:21 PM
I'm not sure you should store the full frames of honey off of the hives. You are asking for wax moths to move in and destroy everything. You also need to watch out for small hive beetles, they will slime and trash the honey comb in about a week. The only safe way I know to store honey still if the frames is either on the hive or cold enough to keep out the pests. I lost a hive to SHB two years ago and it was ugly. Ask about wax moths and SHB at your club. Welcome to bee keeping it is a blast

I have a blog about SHB and it has just about all the information you would need to know about them

kudapucat
02-10-2011, 06:33 AM
Hmmm that's disappointing :-(
Guess I'll have to borrow the gear and do it the hard way :-(

Thanks for all your help and advice

tweak'e
02-11-2011, 12:50 AM
just a mad thought.......got a big chest freezer? put them into the freezer. the cold deals to the wax moth and should keep out SHB (don't have it here so only guessing). however it may make the honey crystallize quick so it will depend on type of honey.

i know people who do that with the empty supers but not when full of honey.

mmclean
02-11-2011, 04:40 AM
It's O.K. to freeze your honey. I've read lots of post on the beekeep forums where people do.

wayneb
02-11-2011, 12:05 PM
It's O.K. to freeze your honey.

I'll tell my wife you said that. ;D

TDMooney
02-11-2011, 12:13 PM
I will be keeping my hives at a local beekeepers farm next year and im hoping that she will let me keep my extractor at her house so that I can just harvest the honey there (after i buy the extractor of course) ... the farm is about 30 minutes away from my house and 45 minutes away from my college

mmclean
02-11-2011, 07:39 PM
I'll tell my wife you said that. ;D

:rolleyes: