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skunkboy
03-13-2011, 04:23 PM
I have a question after getting some scoring comments on one of the meads I entered into a local competition. Do people usually enter a mead by the actual residual sugar and alcohol content of the mead, or by the perceived residual sugar and alcohol? Bugs me when I know that it ended at 1.030 - 1.033 and I'm told that it isn't sweet enough, or that a sack that is 14-15% isn't big enough to be called a sack...

AToE
03-13-2011, 04:33 PM
I thought sack was past 15%? Either way, I'd go by how it's pereceived if it's right on the cusp of two categories.

But I'm not a judge...

mmclean
03-13-2011, 04:52 PM
Seeing as how they don't send them off to a lab, I'd think perceived is all they have to go by.

TDMooney
03-13-2011, 08:59 PM
Seeing as how they don't send them off to a lab, I'd think perceived is all they have to go by.

I agree with mmclean

Oskaar
03-13-2011, 11:22 PM
You'll want to be very close to the guidelines in the BJCP documentation. There are a lot of us that will not hesitate to whip out a hydrometer.

skunkboy
03-14-2011, 12:06 AM
You'll want to be very close to the guidelines in the BJCP documentation. There are a lot of us that will not hesitate to whip out a hydrometer.

That is something I have not yet seen around here... have hydrometer will judge? :-)

mmclean
03-14-2011, 03:40 AM
How do you use a hydrometer in a wine glass with a three ounce pour?

Chevette Girl
03-14-2011, 09:48 AM
...transfer your glass's contents to an extra-skinny test tube? or use one of the little bitty hydrometers?

Oskaar
03-14-2011, 10:00 AM
How do you use a hydrometer in a wine glass with a three ounce pour?

Um, we have access to hydrometers and graduated cylinders and there are three bottles entered. Not too much of a stretch if we really want to!

Generally we go with about a one to two ounce pour. The tasting glasses aren't the big bowls that I generally like to use so smaller is better for swirling.

Prost to the most!

Oskaar

mmclean
03-14-2011, 04:58 PM
And now I know. ;D

pkeeler
03-15-2011, 03:50 PM
Judging is a tough job. I would take comments like you got with a grain of salt. While your mead was in guidelines, remember the judges are sampling numerous entries. If someone sends in a 18%, 1.070 residual bomb; the judge is going to perceive every entry after that as not as sweet. They are human after all. And as humans, they don't want to not give you feedback for all the effort you took. So, even though "Good mead" is what they should write, they feel the need to expand and say things like, "not big enough", "a touch dry" etc.

THawk
04-06-2011, 11:22 AM
Are there any conditions that I have to meet if I someday decide to send in an entry? Not sure if I can mail mead... :)

BrewinNColorado
04-06-2011, 11:52 AM
THawk - The criteria varies from competition to competition. For example, some require you to send in three bottles that are unmarked beer bottles. This year for the Mazer Cup we lifted the restriction on the bottles sizes and colors, but still maintained the 3 bottle requirement. Some competitions might require more bottles, some might require less.

Hope this answered your question.

Michael

wayneb
04-06-2011, 12:00 PM
Unfortunately we're not in control of the shipping process for international entries, so we can offer only suggestions, rather than guaranteed advice, about how to ship your meads for the competition. Several folks in years past have had success shipping with private carriers, such as DHL. Others, depending on the country, have had no issues with shipping via their country's postal services. But in other cases (which appear to be related to the country of origin), meads have been intercepted and turned away at the border - regardless of the shipping method or the carrier.

Generally we advise prospective international home entrants to try to ship using the same instructions that we give to our domestic entrants - to package your meads securely, and to ship them in a non-descript container (such as an unmarked corrugated cardboard box). When you declare the box's contents, if you mark the box as containing alcoholic beverages - that can create problems at our receiving ports, since the existing customs law in the US requires that taxes and duty be assessed on all alcohol shipments entering the country. The laws were written to ensure collection of tax on commercially produced product destined for retail sale, but there are no explicit exceptions for non-commercial home products. So depending on the mood of the customs agent, your home shipment may be cleared, or may be stopped and either destroyed or sent back. We have found that people who declare the contents of their bottles to be something that doesn't suggest there's alcohol inside, have greater success with their shipments.

AToE
04-06-2011, 12:41 PM
I had the shipper of mine write "yeast samples" on the declaration of contents and mine seemed to make it across the border without too much fuss.

Dan McFeeley
04-06-2011, 01:08 PM
Although UPS has regulations barring the shipping of alcoholic beverages, you can have good luck by going to one of their smaller outlets. Sometimes small stores having nothing to do with package delivery, e.g., auto parts, ect., will also have UPS shipping services available. These smaller outlets often do not ask questions about package contents.

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mmclean
04-06-2011, 01:29 PM
Although UPS has regulations barring the shipping of alcoholic beverages, you can have good luck by going to one of their smaller outlets. Sometimes small stores having nothing to do with package delivery, e.g., auto parts, ect., will also have UPS shipping services available. These smaller outlets often do not ask questions about package contents.

--

I think you may have better luck with DHL coming out of the Philippines.

jkane
04-06-2011, 01:31 PM
Now I HAVE to bring a hydrometer to the next contest. This thread made me spit tea all over my tablet. :D

TheAlchemist
04-06-2011, 03:19 PM
I had the shipper of mine write "yeast samples" on the declaration of contents and mine seemed to make it across the border without too much fuss.

Ha!
Very clever reframing.

AToE
04-06-2011, 03:27 PM
Ha!
Very clever reframing.

I thought so too, can't take credit for it though, it seems to be a classic cover story around here!

wayneb
04-06-2011, 03:33 PM
I had the shipper of mine write "yeast samples" on the declaration of contents and mine seemed to make it across the border without too much fuss.

In fact, near as I can tell, yours spent only a day in customs before being cleared to head down to me.