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TheAlchemist
04-14-2011, 08:40 PM
I know a trend when I see one.

How many of y'all mazers count yourself among these?

Dune?
Harry Potter?
Narnia?
Star Wars?

You name it!

AToE
04-14-2011, 09:02 PM
Dune. DUNE. DUNE.

Seriously, I'm not as much of a nut as I used to be, but I'm still heavily involved in the scholarly Dune community, and involved in the fight against those who now control the estate (some are bad people, some are just weak people following bad people). It's a loooooonnnnnng story.

I pretty much am into all serious literary SF. (And though I like some Fantasy as well, I don't lump the two together) And some of the lightweight stuff too, not everything has to be serious.

A lot of people only see/read the junkfood pulp SF, but the truth of it is that ever since it's first days (which go back, way back. I've read SF from over 150 years ago!) SF has been one of the single most important types of literature. It allows examination of humanity in ways that non-SF simply cannot (what better way to discuss the problems of stagnating government/society over the long-term than the 10,000 years of stagnation preceding the first Dune book?) and has always been both a think-tank for scientific advancement (a LOT of real advancement has come out of SF and it's authors. Arthur C. Clarke for example invented the geo-stationary satelite) and also a serious forum for social criticisim.

Some of the most important works of our times are SF. A Clockwork Orange, Fahrenheit 451, Brave New World, We (Russian book, similar to BNW), 1984, the list goes on and on.

Yup, I'm an SF nerd. Hope to be an SF writer one day too!

Displaced Hick
04-14-2011, 09:02 PM
Star Wars, but I don't count episodes 1-3 as real star wars movies rather as attempts to see how many special effects can be crammed in.:)

Chevette Girl
04-14-2011, 09:05 PM
Dune? Saw it a bunch of times, my mom had a crush on Sting so we watched it lots
Harry Potter? Read it all twice, haven't seen them all yet
Narnia? I read it every decade or so, saw the first movie recently
Star Wars? Saw the REAL first one in the back seat of a 1976 Delta 88 oldsmobile when I was three, been a fan ever since, death to Jar-Jar. Wore out the tapes on the VCR when we got Star Wars, Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi

Lord of the Rings?
Xanth?
Starship Troopers?
Bladerunner?
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy?


Edit:
Dune. DUNE. DUNE.

Seriously, I'm not as much of a nut as I used to be, but I'm still heavily involved in the scholarly Dune community, and involved in the fight against those who now control the estate (some are bad people, some are just weak people following bad people). It's a loooooonnnnnng story.

I pretty much am into all serious literary SF. (And though I like some Fantasy as well, I don't lump the two together) And some of the lightweight stuff too, not everything has to be serious.

Some of the most important works of our times are SF. A Clockwork Orange, Fahrenheit 451,

I have read Farenheit 451 as well, I plan to do more digging through my mother in law's SF collection this summer :) (that was before she turned to <gasp> romance novels...) but a lot of my early reading when I'd demolish a novel in a sitting was more historical fiction and fantasy than Sci-Fi... (actually almost named my horse Science Fiction but settled instead for Fantacie)

wildoates
04-14-2011, 09:07 PM
I never got into Dune, despite many tries in my youth. I love the others, though. Just watched PJ's first vlog for start of filming of the Hobbit, and I sincerely he dickers with that less than he did LOTR. The films would have been a lot better if I'd never read the books.

I'd sure love to work on a film like that, though. Why I went into science instead of making things I'll never know.:p

AToE
04-14-2011, 09:07 PM
Star Wars, but I don't count episodes 1-3 as real star wars movies rather as attempts to see how many special effects can be crammed in.:)

I'm with you on that. 2 and 3 were ok (maybe just seemed good compared to 1) but episode 1 should be recalled, burned, and refilmed. Horrible.

I also hate all the FX they added into the originals, I need to find some old VHS that aren't contaminated.

Lucas was heavily influenced by Dune, the number of direct Dune references (or stolen things, depending on who you talk to!) in Star Wars is staggering. Of course, probably more than half of the SF that came after Dune drew from Dune in one way or another, just like the Fantasy genre draws from Tolkien.

What I like about Star Wars isn't so much it's place as any kind of serious SF, it's just great story telling, great film making, just great. ;D

AToE
04-14-2011, 09:09 PM
I never got into Dune, despite many tries in my youth. I love the others, though. Just watched PJ's first vlog for start of filming of the Hobbit, and I sincerely he dickers with that less than he did LOTR. The films would have been a lot better if I'd never read the books.

I'd sure love to work on a film like that, though. Why I went into science instead of making things I'll never know.:p

Ooooo, I'll have to find that vlog!

I thought he did pretty good with the LoTR movies, some really weird changes, but most of the changes they made I understood the reason behind.

It's funny, me and Aaron just had a discussion about bad changes to the LoTR movies when we were hanging out at the Mazer Cup!

AToE
04-14-2011, 09:11 PM
[INDENT]Dune? Saw it a bunch of times, my mom had a crush on Sting so we watched it lots

I love the Lynch film as a piece of weird film, but you've got to read the book. It is seriously amazing. :)

Chevette Girl
04-14-2011, 09:12 PM
I love the Lynch film as a piece of weird film, but you've got to read the book. It is seriously amazing. :)

I'll have to see if my mom still has it, the first time I tried it was a bit much for me.

I think the weirdest film I ever saw was Naked Lunch.

AToE
04-14-2011, 09:14 PM
I'll have to see if my mom still has it, the first time I tried it was a bit much for me.


It's definitely a heavy read, but kind of alight adventure novel compared to some of the later books (note: NOT the new books by his son and some hack, stay away from those...) which get really cerebral and in many cases depressing.

TheAlchemist
04-14-2011, 09:51 PM
...Yup, I'm an SF nerd. Hope to be an SF writer one day too!

Call Me Joseph Campbell but you know what I'm gonna say...

Follow your Bliss...

TheAlchemist
04-14-2011, 09:58 PM
Fourty Two!

OK, someone had to say it...


[QUOTE=Chevette Girl;164777]
Narnia? I read it every decade or so, saw the first movie recently

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy?


Talk about [I]Shamanic Work! Talking Animals! Yes, Narnia merits a once-decadely re-visitation, agreed...

wildoates
04-14-2011, 09:59 PM
Ooooo, I'll have to find that vlog!

I thought he did pretty good with the LoTR movies, some really weird changes, but most of the changes they made I understood the reason behind.

It's funny, me and Aaron just had a discussion about bad changes to the LoTR movies when we were hanging out at the Mazer Cup!

Sorry, shoulda linked it in the first place! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfesknLk5uI&feature=player_embedded)

TheAlchemist
04-14-2011, 10:01 PM
...Why I went into science instead of making things I'll never know.:p

Oh, Dear, we love you in science...

What I said to Alan...
Follow your bliss.

TheAlchemist
04-14-2011, 10:08 PM
...the Fantasy genre draws from Tolkien.

Here's another submitted for your consideration, just because...

Well.

It's funny.

http://www.thewobbitaparody.com/TheWobbitAParody.com/Home.html

mmclean
04-14-2011, 10:10 PM
Isaac Asimov- my first real dive into S-F. The Foundation Series, I Robot Series, Caves of Steel, Nightfall...

Star Trek

Dune- read the first book, thought the movie was good (own a copy).

Most S-F movies, even if they really suck.

TheAlchemist
04-14-2011, 10:14 PM
Sorry, shoulda linked it in the first place! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfesknLk5uI&feature=player_embedded)

Your link is "no longer available"...what was it?

Tiwas
04-15-2011, 03:08 AM
I'm more like Rutger Hauer in "The Hitchhiker" :eek:

moonie
04-15-2011, 03:03 PM
Isaac Asimov- my first real dive into S-F. The Foundation Series, I Robot Series, Caves of Steel, Nightfall...

Star Trek

Dune- read the first book, thought the movie was good (own a copy).

Most S-F movies, even if they really suck.

Isaac Asimov was also my first real adventure into S-F via the Space Ranger books under the pen name Paul French, I was 9 or so when I read all of them, 1977 or so. I do remember seeing all 3 of the original Star Wars movies in the theater.

Guinlilly
04-15-2011, 03:22 PM
I know a trend when I see one.

How many of y'all mazers count yourself among these?

Dune?
Harry Potter?
Narnia?
Star Wars?

You name it!

All! Plus Babylon 5, Fringe, the Ender Series (Ender's Game, Speaker for the Dead, Xenocide, etc.), Starship Troopers, Anne McCaffrey's Dragonrider series combines fantasy and Sci-Fi, also her Pegasus, Crystal Singer, Tower and Hive, Petaybee, Catteni, and Acorna series.

havoc64
04-15-2011, 03:47 PM
Ok here's my Short List,

Role Playing Games (it's all sci-fi)
AD&D
Star Fleet Battles
Magic the Gathering
Wooden Ships and Iron Men
SCA
Champions
BattleTech
the Morrow Project
and many more

as for the books/movies
Yes,
Dune and Star Wars
Not so much the Harry Potter and Narnia, although I adore Anna Popplewell.

But you have to include the entire SW Universe, all the books, and video games.

Also like a lot of Alternate Reality/History books like SM Stirlings Emberverse and Draka Series. Wanna read a good Book, it's a Hugo winner and the Author is Robert A Heinlein. It's called Starship Troopers. Please don't compare it to the movie.

Star Trek, any of it, even the 1st Movie had good parts. BattleStar Galactica and Star Gate series.

Some of my fav authors in the genre are Fred Saberhagen, Terry Brooks, Michael Crichton, RA Salvatore, Alan Dean Foster, Joel Rosenberg, Michael Moorcock, Issac Asimov.

I could be here all day.

Ya know this is one of the reasons I don't like reality TV. I watch TV to relax and forget about the "real world". It's the same reason I read a book or play a video game like Warcraft. The last thing I want to watch on TV is a reality show of 8 snot nosed tweens trying to screw/fight each other..lol

Thank god for the Writers of Fantasy/Sci-fi!

mmclean
04-15-2011, 04:11 PM
All! Plus Babylon 5, Fringe, the Ender Series (Ender's Game, Speaker for the Dead, Xenocide, etc.), Starship Troopers, Anne McCaffrey's Dragonrider series combines fantasy and Sci-Fi, also her Pegasus, Crystal Singer, Tower and Hive, Petaybee, Catteni, and Acorna series.

Anne McCaffrey's Dragonrider was a good read.

AToE
04-15-2011, 04:19 PM
I haven't read McCaffrey in years, but when I was younger I must have read every Pern book 3 or 4 times! I'll have to go buy them all again sometime and get back into them.

Chevette Girl
04-15-2011, 04:23 PM
Tried a couple times, could never get into her books...

oldwhiskers
04-15-2011, 04:51 PM
I know a trend when I see one.

How many of y'all mazers count yourself among these?

Dune?
Harry Potter?
Narnia?
Star Wars?

You name it!

I have to chip in on this one, like them all.

Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, I really liked and I can't think of the name of another one that I liked, can see the faces, but can't remember the movie name at the moment.

Lorela
04-16-2011, 02:57 PM
Another Science fiction geek here too!

All movies even bad ones and Super hero ones too! I love Xmen.

Star Trek yes...Star Wars no.

Started with early writers...Asimov and Bradbury(sp)? Love more recent ,Orson Scott Card, Anne McCaffrey,Patricia McKillip.

But my first love at 7 years old was and is Robert Heinlein, read everything...at least twice and some many many times through the years. The influence of his books on my future reading choices and honestly on my way of thinking cannot be measured. I also love his heir apparent Spider Robinson. If anyone here has read his Callahans series you'll know what I mean when I say that I find the camaraderie between the regulars on Got Mead very Callahans like. I don't think any of you are aliens...well except maybe Oskaar. Those of you who have met him can of course correct me if I am wrong.;D

Lorri

wildoates
04-16-2011, 04:56 PM
Anne McCaffrey is more fantasy than scifi, but I do enjoy much of her early work. The more recent stuff has been more preachy than entertaining. I like David Eddings too, if we're talking fantasy. I'm rereading the Belgariad and the Malleorean right now.

Lorela
04-16-2011, 05:08 PM
"Anne McCaffrey is more fantasy than scifi, but I do enjoy much of her early work. The more recent stuff has been more preachy than entertaining. I like David Eddings too, if we're talking fantasy. I'm rereading the Belgariad and the Malleorean right now."


Agreed on the McCaffrey, her older stuff was much better.

The Belgariad is one of the best fantasy series in my less than humble opinion. If you like that try the Riddle Master of Hed series from Patricia Mckillipp.

Lorri

AToE
04-16-2011, 05:13 PM
That's one of the things I love about her Pern books, they pretend to be fantasy, then slowly reveal themselves as SF. As a kid who only read fantasy, it really helped guide me to becoming the SF nut I am today!

AToE
04-16-2011, 05:15 PM
For Fantasy stuff I'm all about Tad Williams, and now GRR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire (which is being made into a super high quality TV series, first episode airs tomorrow!!! I am sooooo stoked!).

Chevette Girl
04-16-2011, 07:41 PM
I also love his heir apparent Spider Robinson. If anyone here has read his Callahans series you'll know what I mean when I say that I find the camaraderie between the regulars on Got Mead very Callahans like. I don't think any of you are aliens...well except maybe Oskaar. Those of you who have met him can of course correct me if I am wrong.;D


I forgot about Spider! Yeah, I've drawn a couple of parallel lines between gotmead and Callahans too :) Especially with the sporadic pun-offs ;D

Guinlilly
04-16-2011, 07:52 PM
Anne McCaffrey is more fantasy than scifi, but I do enjoy much of her early work. The more recent stuff has been more preachy than entertaining. I like David Eddings too, if we're talking fantasy. I'm rereading the Belgariad and the Malleorean right now.

Oh man, Eddings is some of the most entertaining, laugh out loud reading ever. I regularly reread Polgara the Sorceress. Gotta disagree with the McCaffrey thing though. Dragonriders started fantasy turned sci-fi - the rest of the series I listed are straight up classic Sci-fi - telepathics set in spaceships to run them, telepaths running shipping lines, a sentient planet who alters people to fit that planet, etc etc.

TheAlchemist
04-16-2011, 10:16 PM
...Especially with the sporadic pun-offs ;D

No mention yet here of
Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser/Fritz Leiber
So, here you go.

Grok That!

TheAlchemist
04-16-2011, 10:20 PM
Oh man... etc etc.

You've been visiting the site for a couple of months now, but a thread on sci-fi is what it took to get you to say something here?

Well, Welcome to Got Mead Guinlilly.

Guinlilly
04-16-2011, 10:31 PM
You've been visiting the site for a couple of months now, but a thread on sci-fi is what it took to get you to say something here?

Well, Welcome to Got Mead Guinlilly.

Thanks! I'm Jon's (BrimmingHorn's) girlfriend, so I have my own meadmaster in the house for any questions. I just like reading y'alls posts and this one piqued my intrest. ;D

Lorela
04-16-2011, 10:33 PM
I forgot about Spider! Yeah, I've drawn a couple of parallel lines between gotmead and Callahans too :) Especially with the sporadic pun-offs ;D

Especially the bad puns!:D

Lorri

Lorela
04-16-2011, 10:36 PM
You've been visiting the site for a couple of months now, but a thread on sci-fi is what it took to get you to say something here?

Well, Welcome to Got Mead Guinlilly.


I cannot speak for Quinlilly but I know this thread plus the vegetarian thread gave me a chance to jump in with something I might know about. You all are the experts about Mead which leaves us newer to the craft folks with little to add and much to (silently) learn.

Lorri

havoc64
04-18-2011, 10:13 AM
LOL, I kinda lump Sci-fi and fantasy all together as that's how they are shelved at Barnes and Noble and Hastings.

I never did dig the Pern Books. They read well, I just couldn't get into the stories so well.

Read all of the Grey Mouser books..good reads, Also the Thieves' World series by Robert Lynn Asprin.

I also read a lot of the shadow run books, a good cross of Sci-Fi and Fantasy.

Medsen Fey
04-18-2011, 03:25 PM
STAR TREK!
I grew up on it every day after school; all 69 episode again and again. I love it. I still can't open a flip phone with the speaker on without wanting to say "Kirk to Enterprise! Now if they'd just give me a Phaser, my morning traffic problems would be gone.

Yes, Star Trek has been grand. And I like it all
The Original Series (TOS)
The Next Generation (TNG)
Deep Space Nine (DS9)
Voyager (VOY)
Even Enterprise was great fun.

The movies can be hit or miss, but some, like The Wrath of Khan, are just stellar.
The books (I've read more than I can count) are always great light reading.
Even the history is fun (I read the book by Herb Solow (Desilu exec) and Robert Justman)
I even like the new "young" Kirk (Chris Pine) and Spock (Zachary Quinto)
There's just no end to it all.

Only question I ever thought was hard
Was do I like Kirk or do I like Picard?
------ Weird Al Yankovic

AToE
04-18-2011, 03:49 PM
Picard wins, hands down!

wayneb
04-18-2011, 04:46 PM
If anyone here has read his Callahans series you'll know what I mean when I say that I find the camaraderie between the regulars on Got Mead very Callahans like. I don't think any of you are aliens...well except maybe Oskaar. Those of you who have met him can of course correct me if I am wrong.;D

I could correct you, but that would be wrong! ;D

Seriously (for a moment), I have read SF&F for most of my life, having discovered the Trinity of the Golden Age (Asimov, Clarke and Heinlein) in my local library as soon as they allowed me to roam freely beyond the "Children's Books" section - when I was around 7 or 8 years old. I've been reading ever since, and that includes pretty much everything written by anyone in both genres up to about 1979 or so. From then to now I've been more selective - but then again there was an explosion in the number of published authors that began around the late 1970's and only recently seems to be abating. IMHO, lots of stuff not worth the paper it was printed on was published in the past few decades - so maybe it is a good thing that not so many new titles are actually hitting bookstore shelves these days.

Of course with the new explosion of online publishing and eBook availability, I wonder if there will soon be a corresponding resurgence in speculative fiction. Hopefully the overall quality won't suffer.

I haven't yet read any of Robinson's Callahan series, but I do remember reading a couple of things by him back in the early 80's and published in Asimov's magazine. I guess I'll have to go back and grab a few of the Callahan books.

wayneb
04-18-2011, 04:53 PM
Gotta disagree with the McCaffrey thing though. Dragonriders started fantasy turned sci-fi - the rest of the series I listed are straight up classic Sci-fi - telepathics set in spaceships to run them, telepaths running shipping lines, a sentient planet who alters people to fit that planet, etc etc.

Anne would be thrilled to hear you say that she's got "hard core" SF underpinnings, BTW, as she very much wants (wanted - she's virtually retired now, mostly just consulting on new Pern books that her son, Todd, is writing) everything in the Pern universe to be as scientifically defensible as possible. In the past she has regularly consulted with noted scientists and engineers to make sure that her ideas weren't so fantastic as to have no basis in current scientific thought.

AToE
04-18-2011, 05:02 PM
These 2 genres definitely have a high garbage:quality ratio! I think it's really been that way since the 50s though, there's always been a lot of pulp junk, though the sheer number of authors around today does make sifting through it all for the good authors to be a difficult task sometimes.

New SF authors that are top notch:

Iain M Banks (not that new really, since the late 80s). His "Culture" novels are modern classics, and he's considered one of the greatest SF writers at this time. A good book to start with is The Player of Games.

Richard Morgan (really new, less than 10 years I think). He writes what are essentially mystery/action thrillers, but with a level of intelligence that makes him a formidable author. I think his best book is Black Man, which I believe goes under a different title in the USA, Thirteen. (He's also written one preetty good Fantasy novel now)

Karl Schroeder (also very new): A Canadian guy that hasn't gotten too big yet. His work ranges from super high tech visions of what will happen to us as humans once we stop comprehending the difference between reality and virtual, down to almost steam-punk action novels (which are a blast, and set in probably one of the most amazing environments ever dreamt up in SF).

That's just a really short list, there are a good number of other absolutely amazing SF authors on the go right now.

When it comes to new Fantasy stuff there's really just 2 names that come to mind.

George RR Martin. The A Song of Ice and Fire series, the first book of which is now an HBO series, Game of Thrones (first episode aired yesterday, pretty good so far). Seriously dark and modern Fantasy.

Tad Williams. His Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series remains one of my all time favourite works of Fantasy, and this series was actually the series that convinced GRR Martin to write his ASoIaF series, by proving to him that Fantasy could in fact be done in a modern and adult manner.

Chevette Girl
04-18-2011, 05:49 PM
I read this comic just after catching up on this thread, it seemed appropriate!

Knight Life comic (http://comics.com/the_knight_life/2011-04-18/)

wayneb
04-18-2011, 05:55 PM
I read this comic just after catching up on this thread, it seemed appropriate!

Knight Life comic (http://comics.com/the_knight_life/2011-04-18/)
Perfect! ;D

Lorela
04-18-2011, 07:23 PM
Picard wins, hands down!

Boo Hissss

My heart will always belong to Captain Kirk

Lorri

AToE
04-18-2011, 07:31 PM
They're just 2 different shows with captains to suit the shows. The original was more of a comedy with serious/drama woven in, by the time of TNG Star Trek had become more of a serious show.

Of course I'm definitely biased, as I grew up with TNG and Deep Space 9 (Voyager too, but I wasn't as much of a fan of that one).

AToE
04-18-2011, 07:37 PM
I just realized I'd better retract that statement about the original series being a comedy before I get flamed to death! :eek:

Consider it retracted, it wasn't comedy, it just comes across as a little... funny compared to more recent versions. :)

Lorela
04-18-2011, 07:39 PM
I could correct you, but that would be wrong! ;D

Seriously (for a moment), I have read SF&F for most of my life, having discovered the Trinity of the Golden Age (Asimov, Clarke and Heinlein) in my local library as soon as they allowed me to roam freely beyond the "Children's Books" section - when I was around 7 or 8 years old. I've been reading ever since, and that includes pretty much everything written by anyone in both genres up to about 1979 or so. From then to now I've been more selective - but then again there was an explosion in the number of published authors that began around the late 1970's and only recently seems to be abating. IMHO, lots of stuff not worth the paper it was printed on was published in the past few decades - so maybe it is a good thing that not so many new titles are actually hitting bookstore shelves these days.

Of course with the new explosion of online publishing and eBook availability, I wonder if there will soon be a corresponding resurgence in speculative fiction. Hopefully the overall quality won't suffer.

I haven't yet read any of Robinson's Callahan series, but I do remember reading a couple of things by him back in the early 80's and published in Asimov's magazine. I guess I'll have to go back and grab a few of the Callahan books.


I Knew It!!!!!!!:o

Your reading experiences mirror mine quite a bit. I do agree with the glut of not always very good authors of both fields, particularly through the 70's and 80's.Are we aging ourselves? lol But I am patient and its worth it when you can find gems....like Octavia Butler, Nick Sagan and Orson Scott Card, though I will admit the later can be a bit preachy.

As of yet ebooks are not that appealing to me. Though I do suffer from a serious audio book addiction. I am lucky enough to have a job that doesn't always require me to use all of my mind. ;D So in those times I can keep up with my need to read AND still do other things. I love Audble.com

Definitely try Callahans Chronicles...there is nothing like humor, science fiction, alcohol and friends.

Lorri

Lorela
04-18-2011, 07:42 PM
These 2 genres definitely have a high garbage:quality ratio! I think it's really been that way since the 50s though, there's always been a lot of pulp junk, though the sheer number of authors around today does make sifting through it all for the good authors to be a difficult task sometimes.

New SF authors that are top notch:

Iain M Banks (not that new really, since the late 80s). His "Culture" novels are modern classics, and he's considered one of the greatest SF writers at this time. A good book to start with is The Player of Games.

Richard Morgan (really new, less than 10 years I think). He writes what are essentially mystery/action thrillers, but with a level of intelligence that makes him a formidable author. I think his best book is Black Man, which I believe goes under a different title in the USA, Thirteen. (He's also written one preetty good Fantasy novel now)

Karl Schroeder (also very new): A Canadian guy that hasn't gotten too big yet. His work ranges from super high tech visions of what will happen to us as humans once we stop comprehending the difference between reality and virtual, down to almost steam-punk action novels (which are a blast, and set in probably one of the most amazing environments ever dreamt up in SF).

That's just a really short list, there are a good number of other absolutely amazing SF authors on the go right now.

When it comes to new Fantasy stuff there's really just 2 names that come to mind.

George RR Martin. The A Song of Ice and Fire series, the first book of which is now an HBO series, Game of Thrones (first episode aired yesterday, pretty good so far). Seriously dark and modern Fantasy.

Tad Williams. His Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series remains one of my all time favourite works of Fantasy, and this series was actually the series that convinced GRR Martin to write his ASoIaF series, by proving to him that Fantasy could in fact be done in a modern and adult manner.

I will definitely watch out for these last two. The audio book club I belong to is pushing the Martin series. Tad Williams is a new name for me, I will research. Its nice to get another readers recommendations.

Lorri

Lorela
04-18-2011, 07:44 PM
I read this comic just after catching up on this thread, it seemed appropriate!

Knight Life comic (http://comics.com/the_knight_life/2011-04-18/)

Good one! lol

Lorela
04-18-2011, 07:45 PM
I just realized I'd better retract that statement about the original series being a comedy before I get flamed to death! :eek:

Consider it retracted, it wasn't comedy, it just comes across as a little... funny compared to more recent versions. :)


Smart move.;D There is a difference between camp and comedy...well and bad acting too. But remember many of us liked it that way!

Lorri

AToE
04-18-2011, 08:01 PM
Duly noted!

Octavia Butler is great, Ursula K LeGuin is another great female SF author.
I've only read one Orson Scott Card book, but it was great - I just have to turn off the part of my brain that thinks about the author while reading his stuff (he's a nutbar, but a good writer!).

Tad Williams is really good. I haven't finished his latest series, the Shadow____ series, as I think the last book is still in hardcover and I'm being patient waiting for it to become cheaper.

He hasn't written a lot, not a very prolific writer, but what he does write is really good.

Be warned, GRR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire is not for everyone. It walks a pretty fine line with a few things, (frankly I think steps over that line a few times too) but it's really high quality. That series shows more dedication to realism than any other series I've ever read, of ANY genre. Any character could die at any moment - you don't read a chapter thinking "how are they going to get out of this one?" you read it thinking "oh man, they're dead. Doesn't matter that it's the main character and the series is only half way in, I'm sure they're about to die". And then he messes with you, right when you're sure someone's toast, they live (in a believable way) and then when you think there's no danger, WHAM someone dies (again, very believable though).

Seriously good stuff. But, similar to say LoTR, it takes a while for the action to kick in. It's absolutely essential to at least get into the second book, because the first is largely just set-up (interesting set-up, but definitely set-up none the less).

wayneb
04-19-2011, 12:01 PM
Another female author worth reading (IMHO) is Lois McMaster Bujold. I have enjoyed the early books in her Vorkosigan saga series, although I haven't kept up with the most recent ones. She has a knack for telling real "old school" SF - with a couple of more contemporary ideas and twists thrown in.

And Lorri, yeah - I guess I'm allowing my age to show a bit. ;D FWIW, I grew up in the Star Trek -TOS era, and despite the clearly campy nature of many of those old scripts, I loved that show! Hard not to, when you're a pre-teen geek looking for anything that can transport you away from the gritty reality of growing up in a steel mill town. I still occasionally get some fun out of watching a rerun or two of those old episodes, but I have to admit that more than a few of them are either so blatant or so naive that I cringe a little nowadays.

Oh, and I'm off to look for some of the Callahan books later today....

TheAlchemist
04-19-2011, 05:39 PM
Let's hear it for the Python Boys!

Sure, they're not SciFi writers...

"Blessed are the MeadMakers..."

skunkboy
04-19-2011, 06:53 PM
"Blessed are the MeadMakers..."

Well, obviously it's not meant to be taken literally; it refers to any brewer of a fermented beverage... ;-)

Chevette Girl
04-19-2011, 11:32 PM
Another female author worth reading (IMHO) is Lois McMaster Bujold. I have enjoyed the early books in her Vorkosigan saga series, although I haven't kept up with the most recent ones. She has a knack for telling real "old school" SF - with a couple of more contemporary ideas and twists thrown in.

Ooh, how could I forget her!! I loved that series, reading it the second time now...

wildoates
04-19-2011, 11:40 PM
Anne would be thrilled to hear you say that she's got "hard core" SF underpinnings, BTW, as she very much wants (wanted - she's virtually retired now, mostly just consulting on new Pern books that her son, Todd, is writing) everything in the Pern universe to be as scientifically defensible as possible. In the past she has regularly consulted with noted scientists and engineers to make sure that her ideas weren't so fantastic as to have no basis in current scientific thought.

She does that, and yes, she does have scifi in most of her work--I guess that most scifi seems to be edgier than the types of fantasy I tend to read, but you're completely right that she does a fine job trying to be realistic. Not real, but realistic. ;D

I have read and reread most of her work over the years and it has given me many hours of pleasurable reading.

wildoates
04-19-2011, 11:43 PM
Yeah, I totally cried when Robintion died. :)

TheAlchemist
04-20-2011, 09:29 AM
Well, obviously it's not meant to be taken literally; it refers to any brewer of a fermented beverage... ;-)

Love that.

OH!

And Speaking of way, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract.

Madeline L'Engle

wayneb
04-20-2011, 10:48 AM
Not real, but realistic. ;D

That's her goal, and as far as I can tell she's been consistent and mostly successful in achieving it. I actually got to know her through her son, Todd. He and I struck up a casual conversation at a convention years ago (well, I can say decades ago, now) before I knew who his mother was, and we discovered we had common interests in piloting aircraft, the space program (I was working directly for NASA back then), and most SF. Todd and I have been friends ever since.

One thing led to another, and eventually my wife and I were invited to his mom's place in Ireland for a few days, I was tapped as one of the technical consultants on one of her Pern books, and eventually my wife, my kids, and I became "characters" in one of the modern Doona books (co-written with Jody Lynn Nye, another friend of ours). Believe me, it is a totally surreal experience to encounter characters named after yourself, living completely different lives in an alternate universe! ;)

AToE
04-20-2011, 12:33 PM
That's her goal, and as far as I can tell she's been consistent and mostly successful in achieving it. I actually got to know her through her son, Todd. He and I struck up a casual conversation at a convention years ago (well, I can say decades ago, now) before I knew who his mother was, and we discovered we had common interests in piloting aircraft, the space program (I was working directly for NASA back then), and most SF. Todd and I have been friends ever since.

One thing led to another, and eventually my wife and I were invited to his mom's place in Ireland for a few days, I was tapped as one of the technical consultants on one of her Pern books, and eventually my wife, my kids, and I became "characters" in one of the modern Doona books (co-written with Jody Lynn Nye, another friend of ours). Believe me, it is a totally surreal experience to encounter characters named after yourself, living completely different lives in an alternate universe! ;)

WHAT?!?!? Are you KIDDING ME? Ha! I am extremely jealous, I don't normally get starstruck, but McCaffrey was one of the most influential authors in my life, she really was a big deal to me!

EDIT: Do you remember what book you consulted for, and what aspect of it? I'd love to go grab a copy and re-read it, thinking that someone I know was involved!

Smarrikåka
04-20-2011, 01:03 PM
I hope Wayne doesn't mind.
But I became curious and found the text here:

http://veeshanvault.org/shared/evenmorebooks/Anne%20Mccaffrey%20-%20Doona%202%20-%20Crisis%20On%20Doona.txt

Do a search for "boncyk" to get to the parts with Wayne in it.

I hope he doesn't shoot me now, but I'll take my chances (he said the writings were realistic, and the writings in turn said he was a notoriously bad shot).

wildoates
04-20-2011, 01:15 PM
That's her goal, and as far as I can tell she's been consistent and mostly successful in achieving it. I actually got to know her through her son, Todd. He and I struck up a casual conversation at a convention years ago (well, I can say decades ago, now) before I knew who his mother was, and we discovered we had common interests in piloting aircraft, the space program (I was working directly for NASA back then), and most SF. Todd and I have been friends ever since.

One thing led to another, and eventually my wife and I were invited to his mom's place in Ireland for a few days, I was tapped as one of the technical consultants on one of her Pern books, and eventually my wife, my kids, and I became "characters" in one of the modern Doona books (co-written with Jody Lynn Nye, another friend of ours). Believe me, it is a totally surreal experience to encounter characters named after yourself, living completely different lives in an alternate universe! ;)


My dad was one of the characters in Clive Cussler's books, so yeah, that's awesome!

Now I have to go through all my Pern books to see which one has your name in it--and I have them all, pretty much. The first one I read was White Dragon, which was found in a pile behind a bookstore, unsold with the cover torn off, destined for the trash. Of course, once you've read the third book you have to read one and two, and then you end up buying all of them. :o

wayneb
04-20-2011, 01:15 PM
I hope Wayne doesn't mind.


Thanks, Johan! Now everybody knows that I'm a pig farmer in an alternate universe.... :p ;D

And Jenn, I'll save you some time. It was "Renegades of Pern" that benefitted in a very minor way from my 'rocket scientist' expertise. Now to be clear that's the one I consulted on - my name's not in it (at least as far as I remember).

AToE
04-20-2011, 01:33 PM
I remember that book for sure, do you recall what exactly of your rocket science ended up influencing it?

This is crazy cool.

wayneb
04-20-2011, 01:50 PM
Well, at the time I was working in the Space Station Program Office at NASA, and we were developing various "use case" scenarios for the station. One of those (never realized because of incessant budget cuts) was as a jumping off point for human planetary exploration (and future colonization). Since she was defining the parameters of what an initial human colony on another planet would be like (as a very small subplot in the Renegades story), I got to see if her ideas "passed the sniff test."

Chevette Girl
04-20-2011, 06:01 PM
You know, I wish more authors and screenwriters (and video game writers, for that matter) would do that... (have someone legitimate run it though a "sniff test" I mean, to make sure things are at least plausible instead of making the reader hang his disbelief out on the clothesline just to get through a book, like some of the "science" in Spelljammer)...

wildoates
04-20-2011, 11:20 PM
Thanks, Johan! Now everybody knows that I'm a pig farmer in an alternate universe.... :p ;D

And Jenn, I'll save you some time. It was "Renegades of Pern" that benefitted in a very minor way from my 'rocket scientist' expertise. Now to be clear that's the one I consulted on - my name's not in it (at least as far as I remember).

Ah, I liked that one. :)

oldmate
04-21-2011, 12:47 AM
Firefly... Anyone??

Chevette Girl
04-21-2011, 08:56 AM
Firefly... Anyone??

Best sci-fi space western EVER. ;D

wayneb
04-21-2011, 10:30 AM
Shiny! ;)

Brytodd
04-21-2011, 12:11 PM
Hello all would like to chime in on this thread and offer you 3 names for fantasy books. Brent Weeks, Gail Z Martin and Patrick Rothfuss. All three top notch writers.

TheAlchemist
04-26-2011, 05:57 PM
I may have not said it before, but I will certainly say it again:

Thank You Gotmeaders.
Thank You for inspiring me.

I'm a lightweight in the sci fi department, but have seen some authors names thrown around here and decided to pay a visit to the audiobooks section of the library.

Got myself started with Anne McCaffrey's Dragonflight. Thank you for introducing me.

Riverat
04-29-2011, 10:27 PM
Hello all would like to chime in on this thread and offer you 3 names for fantasy books. Brent Weeks, Gail Z Martin and Patrick Rothfuss. All three top notch writers.

And being brave enough to at least hint at my antiquity...Doyle, Vern & Wells, and the youngsters Azimov and Niven being a few of my favourites!

veritas
05-12-2011, 07:34 PM
Have to throw my hat in with my LOVE of FIREFLY.

Loadnabox
05-13-2011, 12:47 PM
Misery, Sorrow & Thorn, one of my favorite trilogies of all time, I have first press editions in hardback of all three. In fact I think I'm due to re-read them about now, it's been a few years.

AToE
05-13-2011, 12:59 PM
Misery, Sorrow & Thorn, one of my favorite trilogies of all time, I have first press editions in hardback of all three. In fact I think I'm due to re-read them about now, it's been a few years.

This is probably one of the most re-read series for me in my life. Have you checked out his new series? I haven't finished it yet (took a good 3 or 4 years off to let him finish the thing, I was tired of waiting between books!), but it's good stuff. Frankly it steals a lot from the MS&T series though, but I guess if you're stealing then it might as well be from yourself!

Loadnabox
05-13-2011, 01:12 PM
This is probably one of the most re-read series for me in my life. Have you checked out his new series? I haven't finished it yet (took a good 3 or 4 years off to let him finish the thing, I was tired of waiting between books!), but it's good stuff. Frankly it steals a lot from the MS&T series though, but I guess if you're stealing then it might as well be from yourself!

I haven't seen them yet, I'll need to go check Amazon. My recent readings have been titles such as "Your wife's pregnancy hormones and how not to get killed" and "Your baby's feces, dealing with it getting on you and everything else"[sic]

I also though John Scalzi's "The Androids' Dream" was a nice read, easy and interesting

TheAlchemist
05-13-2011, 06:35 PM
I haven't seen them yet, I'll need to go check Amazon. My recent readings have been titles such as "Your wife's pregnancy hormones and how not to get killed" and "Your baby's feces, dealing with it getting on you and everything else"[sic]



Strangely, this does sound like SciFi to me...

Presently I'm having Watership Down read to me on tape.

Guinlilly
05-13-2011, 09:52 PM
Presently I'm having Watership Down read to me on tape.

Oooh Watership Down, I love that book. I'm currently reading The Land of the Painted Caves, last of Jean Auel's Earth's Children series.

TheAlchemist
05-14-2011, 10:22 AM
Oooh Watership Down, I love that book. I'm currently reading The Land of the Painted Caves, last of Jean Auel's Earth's Children series.

I didn't know she had a new one. I read them so long ago (1989?).

There's a theatrical production of Watership Down that I hope to see next month, so I'm doing my homework...

Guinlilly
05-14-2011, 11:00 AM
I didn't know she had a new one. I read them so long ago (1989?).

There is a total of 7 - Clan of the Cave Bear, Valley of the Horses, The Mammoth Hunters, The Plains of Passages, The Shelters of Stone, and The Land of Painted Caves. Tbh - I'm not enjoying this last one, it just doesn't seem to jive with the rest. Her work is still some of my favorite though and she is partially why my entire upper back is tattooed with the cave paintings of Altamira, Lascaux, and Peche Merle.

Loadnabox
05-14-2011, 12:29 PM
After looking at my bookshels, others I really liked:

The Wreck of the River of Stars totally different kind of sci-fi, it's a space tragedy so it's pretty interesting trying to figure out which characters will LIVE

A fire upon the deep and a deepness in the sky by vernor vinge


good stuff all of them

Chevette Girl
05-15-2011, 05:11 PM
Oooh Watership Down, I love that book. I'm currently reading The Land of the Painted Caves, last of Jean Auel's Earth's Children series.

<sigh> I must admit, I did not enjoy reading a lot of the "classics" I've laid my hands on. I at least liked Watership Down better than Bonfire of the Vanities or Gone with the Wind or the original Dracula... Not wanted on the Voyage was dreadful, as was The Red Pony by Steinbeck, and I loathed anything by Margaret Atwood and Mordecai Richler and a lot of what they made us read in English class, I think Wyndham's "The Chrysalids" was the only school novel (after Charlotte's Web) that I genuinely enjoyed reading that made me go read more of his work because I liked it, rather than because I couldn't believe that I hated the work of such a reknowned writer so much... Only thing worse than the novels were the short stories, "The painted door", "The Lottery" and "Death of a Salesman", you'd think they didn't WANT us to get an interest in reading! Ugh!!!

However, I did buzzsaw through Jean Auel as fast as I could get my hands on them when I was a kid, along with any other historical fiction my mom was reading at the time (Diana Gabaldon, anyone?) although I have only read up to the Plains of Passage (I like to think I may have made up for lack of continuing by reading the first three at least five or six times each through high school, I think Clan of the Cave Bear I first read at 12)... haven't heard good things about the latest one, either, what I heard is that her style of description has gotten even more voluminous so you read for three pages before she's done describing the shape of the leaf and all the possible uses of the plant that they just walked past...

Fantasy: Charles De Lint. I had totally forgotten, it's been so long since I've read his stuff, but it did the rounds with my group of friends once upon a time... I believe he lives in Ottawa and can occasionally be found jamming with local folk music groups :)

sarend
05-15-2011, 06:53 PM
I recently introduced my two children to the original Star Wars, and, yep, another generation is hooked. If I do not have a lightsaber duel 5 nights out of 7 then something is wrong. Of course, I get Vader's red saber and I "have to" die. It is great.

Stephen

TheAlchemist
05-15-2011, 07:41 PM
I recently introduced my two children to the original Star Wars, and, yep, another generation is hooked. If I do not have a lightsaber duel 5 nights out of 7 then something is wrong. Of course, I get Vader's red saber and I "have to" die. It is great.

Stephen

Love this.:)

TheAlchemist
05-15-2011, 07:48 PM
<sigh> I must admit, I did not enjoy reading a lot of the "classics..."

Bonfire is one of the rare books I just put down midstream and never picked it up again. Couldn't finish Joyce's Ulysses despite doing a geographic/literary pairing (read it in Ireland). Started reading Auel on the campo in Bolivia in 1989, sou you might could consider that a geo/lit pairing as well...

Loved Dracula, though, listened to Andrew Lloyd Weber's Requiem while I was reading it, seemed a perfect match, painful tender sweet bits and dark disasterous bits all seemes to synchronously coincide...

Love Walker Percy for his existential pathos, off the SciFi subject...

sarend
05-15-2011, 07:49 PM
When I am tired from work and I end the duel "too quickly" (sorry for the Princess Bride theft), my son tells me that I am doing it wrong--he has to win. So, we re-duel and I die a great death. Of course, we do this in a darkened room so the lighsabers really show-up nicely.

Both of my kids are reading now, so I am excited about the future when they can tackle the following: Starship Troopers, Princess Bride, Hitch Hiker's Guide, The Hobbit, ect.


Stephen

TheAlchemist
05-15-2011, 08:21 PM
Princess Bride is one of my all time favorite most-quotable-ever films. Haven't read the book though.

veritas
05-15-2011, 08:25 PM
Princess Bride is one of my all time favorite most-quotable-ever films. Haven't read the book though.


Agreed love this movie! Also have not read the book. My three year old makes me have tea parties so I think you lucked out on your light saber fights... Then again she does like the plastic axe and helmet i got her from how to train your dragon.

Guinlilly
05-15-2011, 08:27 PM
Both of my kids are reading now, so I am excited about the future when they can tackle the following: Starship Troopers, Princess Bride, Hitch Hiker's Guide, The Hobbit, ect.


Stephen

Aaah three of my favorites there - Starship Troopers (I even love the godawful movie, even though it is NOTHING like the book), Princess Bride - the book is BRILLIANT, and Hitch Hiker's. Just <3

Loadnabox
05-15-2011, 09:47 PM
@CG: Don't feel bad about the classics, they don't transcend generations AT ALL and really just become books for self proclaimed English lit snobs to feel superior intellectually 'cause they "get it"

In high school I did an English report on why I didn't finish reading the Great Gatsby, why I was swore I never would (finish reading it), and why anyone who actually thought it was good writing was a complete moron....I got an A

Chevette Girl
05-16-2011, 01:59 AM
Princess Bride is one of my all time favorite most-quotable-ever films. Haven't read the book though.

Me either. Same with Starship Troopers. Those are books I should go read though...

Chevette Girl
05-16-2011, 02:01 AM
@CG: Don't feel bad about the classics, they don't transcend generations AT ALL and really just become books for self proclaimed English lit snobs to feel superior intellectually 'cause they "get it"

In high school I did an English report on why I didn't finish reading the Great Gatsby, why I was swore I never would (finish reading it), and why anyone who actually thought it was good writing was a complete moron....I got an A

Yeah, I did an essay on how Mordecai Richler couldn't write a balanced female character after suffering through Duddy Kravitz and backing it up with The Acrobats, the only marks I lost on that essay were for my penmanship.

Oh, the only thing worse than reading the Great Gatsby was watching that horrid movie...

gaah, now I'm gonna need some Mercedes Lackey to get to sleep tonight!

AToE
05-16-2011, 02:10 AM
Starship Troopers the movie is probably one of the books-to-film world record holders for having almost nothing to do with the book!

The book is good, I didn't like it much the first time through, lots of neat ideas and parts but it felt like a short story that for some reason was stretched into a novel and didn't quite make it.

Then an SF literary buff I know told me to read it again, but looking at it as a utopia story - totally made it make sense.

Chevette Girl
05-16-2011, 08:38 AM
Starship Troopers the movie is probably one of the books-to-film world record holders for having almost nothing to do with the book!


Directly from the special features on a movie that shared the title and not much else with the original book, author: "Hi, I'm Tom Clancy and I wrote the book he ignored."
director: "Oh, come now, I didn't change everything!"
Mr. Clancy: "Well, I suppose you used the title..."

If only I could remember which one it was... they detonated a dirty nuke in the 'states somewhere...

Loadnabox
05-16-2011, 08:51 AM
Yeah, I did an essay on how Mordecai Richler couldn't write a balanced female character after suffering through Duddy Kravitz and backing it up with The Acrobats, the only marks I lost on that essay were for my penmanship.

Oh, the only thing worse than reading the Great Gatsby was watching that horrid movie...

gaah, now I'm gonna need some Mercedes Lackey to get to sleep tonight!

"But you're not supposed to like the characters! It was a book about nothing to draw light to the do-nothing socialites of the time!"

So lemme get this straight, a book that has no discernible plot, goes nowhere and has characters that you can't hate or like and thus don't give a S--- about? And this proves he's one of the all time great writers? I'm pretty sure all of that proves F Scott Fitzgerald is the most overrated author of all time (The rest of his works while slightly better still suck so bad as to bend light, space and time)

Chevette Girl
05-16-2011, 09:31 AM
"But you're not supposed to like the characters! It was a book about nothing to draw light to the do-nothing socialites of the time!"

So lemme get this straight, a book that has no discernible plot, goes nowhere and has characters that you can't hate or like and thus don't give a S--- about? And this proves he's one of the all time great writers? I'm pretty sure all of that proves F Scott Fitzgerald is the most overrated author of all time (The rest of his works while slightly better still suck so bad as to bend light, space and time)

Oh, no, I hated them all. Same problem I had with Gone with the Wind, and Dracula... if I hate all the characters and hate everything they do, why on earth am I reading this?

Oh, and unfortunately Ann McCaffrey has been the only author I've gotten a chapter into without finishing the book... I don't know why that was, either... Well, her and one rather long short story in Piers Anthony's Anthonology, three pages and you're out...

Loadnabox
05-16-2011, 01:24 PM
Oh, no, I hated them all. Same problem I had with Gone with the Wind, and Dracula... if I hate all the characters and hate everything they do, why on earth am I reading this?

Oh, and unfortunately Ann McCaffrey has been the only author I've gotten a chapter into without finishing the book... I don't know why that was, either... Well, her and one rather long short story in Piers Anthony's Anthonology, three pages and you're out...

Wheel of Time... I tried three of the Wheel of Time books and always stall half way through completely bored.

TheAlchemist
05-17-2011, 06:46 PM
The Wobbit: A Parody
is now available on amazon kindle.
It's current. It's funny.

Tannin Boy
05-17-2011, 07:33 PM
I know a trend when I see one.

How many of y'all mazers count yourself among these?

Dune?
Harry Potter?
Narnia?
Star Wars?

You name it!

Kurt Vonnegut....

Some of the best reading I've done.

TB

AToE
05-17-2011, 07:41 PM
Kurt Vonnegut....

Some of the best reading I've done.

TB

Slaughterhouse Five is the only thing of his I've read, didn't make it all the way through I don't think (extremely rare for me), it just didn't grab me enough and I think I was too busy in life at the time. I'm sure it's one you've got to read the whole thing for it to make sense though.

TheAlchemist
05-17-2011, 08:32 PM
Slaughterhouse Five is the only thing of his I've read, didn't make it all the way through I don't think (extremely rare for me), it just didn't grab me enough and I think I was too busy in life at the time. I'm sure it's one you've got to read the whole thing for it to make sense though.

At the core, it's a WW II novel.

TheAlchemist
10-27-2011, 06:36 PM
Finished reading Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B Jenkins.
The writing. Ugh!

Worthy of a reasonably good high school creative writing student. I am sorry to say I was unable to discover a character whose development or fate mattered much to me. The plot was predictable and pretty much brought to mind the image of browsing a tritely written religious tract one might discover in the water closet at a train station and pick up for curosity whilst finishing one's business...

C. S. Lewis' Last Battle, while covering the same Biblical territory, is much more eloquent, elegant, delicious.

Anyway, I decided to get back to the source material, was happy to learn that my library offers The Bible on CD, and started listening to The Revelation to John.

Ahhh...that's more like it.

Chevette Girl
10-27-2011, 08:39 PM
I felt much the same after reading Timothy Findley's "Not Wanted on the Voyage".

AToE
10-27-2011, 11:47 PM
I love C.S. Lewis, though Tolkien was definitely right that Lewis really doesn't know what being subtle is when it comes to biblical meanings! He pretty much beats you over the head with it the whole time, but what a fun beating!

I'm planning on getting a tattoo of Tash (sorry if that's incorrect, must be a decade since I read the series) from The Last Battle covering my whole back, should look pretty killer.

TheAlchemist
10-28-2011, 07:34 PM
Lewis sure seems to have been into Shamanic Journeywork. Through a wardrobe to visit with talking animals, indeed!

AToE
10-28-2011, 08:37 PM
He seemed to me to basically just take whatever "fairy tale" or "folk tale" style material he could and mash it on top of a plot that would convey what he was trying to get across biblically. The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe is the story of Jesus, The Last Battle is Revelations, not sure about the rest, I'd have to re-read them and try to figure it all out. Some of it might have been less biblical since Tolkien gave him a hard time about it!

Chevette Girl
10-30-2011, 08:49 PM
You know, I never even noticed any biblical whatnot other than Aslan the lion... guess next read, I'll have to think about it and see what I pick out.

MightyJesse
10-31-2011, 01:36 AM
I didn't set out to be a sci-fi nerd. I'm just a voracious reader whose father's sci-fi collection got in my way.

Piers Anthony (WHY is "Bio of a Space Tyrant" out of print??)
Asimov (Norby Chronicles to Foundation's Edge)
David Weber (Honor Harrington)
Meyer (Vampires. Do. Not. TWINKLE, Ms. Meyer...)
Rowling (The British version made a lot more sense. I KNOW what a Philosopher's Stone is, so get on with it...)
Adams (I frequently fall toward the ground, but have yet to miss...)
Gaimon (Neverwhere, Sandman)
McCaffrey (Not a fan of Pern. The Shell people, on the other hand, I quite liked. City Who Fought was probably my favorite of them.)
Robinson (Callahan's. The author named himself for my father in law. We modeled our bar, in part, after Callahan's.)
Heinlein (Dad used to simplify the adult themes and geek out on the sciency bits as retellings of these tales during long car rides.)
Neal Stephenson (The Diamond Age and Snow Crash made my brains a happy little bit of whirring machinery for a while...)
Herbert (Dune both the movie with Sting and the book... For different reasons.)

There's probably stuff I'm forgetting, and I've barely touched my "children's section sci-fi/fantasy" collection...

That's right... I fit right in here... Or at least I will when I can start drinking my own mead...

MikeaJones113
10-31-2011, 10:26 AM
Clifford D. Simak
Gene Wolfe
Robert E. Howard
China Mieville
R. Scott Bakker
Charles Yu
Cordwainer Smith
Richard Kadrey
William Gibson

The list could go on and on. Such great stuff.

SpamDog
11-01-2011, 04:54 AM
Ok, So I second, pretty much everything already in this thread. I won't list them to save some space, hehe.
I'd like to especially second the Brent Weeks mention, And add Karen Miller and Amanda Downum (both geared toward fantasy, tho Karen Miller wrote some Star Wars Books)

Also I think more than the others I am a Doctor Who fan, been watching that for as long as I can remember!

SpamDog

AToE
11-01-2011, 01:13 PM
Clifford D. Simak
Gene Wolfe
Robert E. Howard
China Mieville
R. Scott Bakker
Charles Yu
Cordwainer Smith
Richard Kadrey
William Gibson

The list could go on and on. Such great stuff.

Just started getting into Mieville, really really awesome - nothing quite like weird to the max!

And speaking of weird to the max, you're only the second person I've ever found that's also read Cordwainer Smith - love love love his stuff. ;D

wayneb
11-02-2011, 01:22 PM
And speaking of weird to the max, you're only the second person I've ever found that's also read Cordwainer Smith - love love love his stuff. ;D

You can add a third to your list. ;) So, you like psychological mind games in your short stories, do you? Have you dug into the "real person" behind the pseudonym? He was quite an expert in both the Far East and in the psych warfare research that western military organizations were pursuing in the early part of the Cold War.

AToE
11-02-2011, 06:05 PM
You can add a third to your list. ;) So, you like psychological mind games in your short stories, do you? Have you dug into the "real person" behind the pseudonym? He was quite an expert in both the Far East and in the psych warfare research that western military organizations were pursuing in the early part of the Cold War.

You just turn out to be more and more cool my friend!

Yes I did quite a bit of research on him actually, apparently some of his stories every single whacky character represends a middle eastern politician, so forth and so on, really cool.

The most interesting thing I thought was the the name was seriously because he wanted to be anonymous, he had this weird thing where once fans talked to him about his work he could never write in that genre again - it happened to him earlier apparently with a different genre. And when Scanners Live In Vain was first published everyone knew it was too good for a newb, and to all the authors and publishers it was a big mystery as to who Smith really was - it sounds like it was quite the fun time actually!

I'm pretty involved in the academic side of SF. Uber nerd right here. ;D

I like a bunch of his work, but Scanners Live in Vain is probably one of the very very best pieces using the cyborg motif ever written I think.

wayneb
11-02-2011, 08:27 PM
I like a bunch of his work, but Scanners Live in Vain is probably one of the very very best pieces using the cyborg motif ever written I think.

We agree! (At least from what I can remember - I read it back when I was in High School and I've got to re-read that one and others to see for myself how well they've stood up to the test of time.)

But, not bad for his first foray into the genre, eh?
;D

AToE
11-03-2011, 01:19 AM
Ha, if by "not bad" you mean freaking unbelievable then yes! That kind of thing happens a lot though, Dune was the second novel Frank Herbert ever wrote for example, there are quite a few authors that just seem to have "it". Hopefully one day when I've experienced more my writing will be even half of what some of the greats can/could accomplish - right now I feel like I have some deep insights, but not enough to really carry my writing... there's no substitute for just living more I think.

Noe Palacios
11-03-2011, 03:45 PM
I know a trend when I see one.

How many of y'all mazers count yourself among these?

Dune?
Harry Potter?
Narnia?
Star Wars?

You name it!

During Childhood - All Jules Verne's books - Star Trek OS - Lost in Space

Later: Soylent Green - The Time Machine - Close Encounters of the Third Kind - Star Wars - 1984 - Starman (movie)

Now: Star Trek (all franchise) - Star Gate (movie) - Every documental about physics, specially Stephen Hawking's ones, these documentals are the best Sci Fi ever.

Saludos

Riverat
11-03-2011, 04:38 PM
During Childhood - All Jules Verne's books - Star Trek OS - Lost in Space

Later: Soylent Green - The Time Machine - Close Encounters of the Third Kind - Star Wars - 1984 - Starman (movie)

Now: Star Trek (all franchise) - Star Gate (movie) - Every documental about physics, specially Stephen Hawking's ones, these documentals are the best Sci Fi ever.

Saludos

Toss in Wells and Doyle plus all th SG franchises and I'll second that, science these days is almost as good as fiction!

TheAlchemist
11-07-2011, 11:34 PM
So, you like psychological mind games in your short stories, do you?

Try this one:
The Candidate
by Henry Slesar