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Golden Sun God
04-20-2011, 04:47 PM
I was thinking about making a strawberry mead bit somebody in my apartment is allergic to strawberries and I was wondering if it would be safe for me to make it since it would be in close proximity to them. They are highly allergic to strawberries. Their allergy was first by consuming anything with strawberry, but then it changed and if strawberries that have started to rot/mold and have started to release their juice get within 10-15 feet they start having trouble breathing. I'm just wondering would there be enough fumes(or whatever) released from the strawberries to possibly cause a reaction.

Smarrikåka
04-20-2011, 04:49 PM
If they're as allergic as you say, it's probably not a good idea too have strawberries anywhere near your apartment.

Medsen Fey
04-20-2011, 04:50 PM
Although that is a bit odd, it is certainly possible that whatever triggers their allergies is volatile and so I would not ferment strawberries in their vicinity.

AToE
04-20-2011, 04:54 PM
Yeah... see if you can find somewhere else to ferment that one I'd say (I've never heard of someone being that allergic to anything, crazy). I wouldn't even want strawberries in the building in that situation.

mmclean
04-20-2011, 05:15 PM
I used to date a girl who would have a reaction if she walked into a room that had a strawberry cake in it. Even if she had no idea the cake was there.

May be the nice thing to do, to ferment them off site. :)

Golden Sun God
04-21-2011, 12:56 AM
Yeah that was what I was thinking, I just wanted to make sure. Kinda sucks though. I don't really have anywhere that would be able to ferment anything other then my apartment. :crybaby2:

Loadnabox
04-21-2011, 08:24 AM
Yeah... see if you can find somewhere else to ferment that one I'd say (I've never heard of someone being that allergic to anything, crazy). I wouldn't even want strawberries in the building in that situation.

I once knew a guy whose children were so allergic to peanuts, he ate a PB&J at lunch, went home and six hours later when he kissed his boys' cheeks sent them into anaphylactic shock (which they of course had epi pins for thank goodness)

While rare, allergies this severe are not unheard of.

Then there's the other end such as my wife who can't have any molds or fungi (Cheese, Mushrooms or Coffee). Won't kill her but if she eats them makes her super sleepy and causes GI distress down the road.

THawk
04-24-2011, 09:00 AM
Yeah... see if you can find somewhere else to ferment that one I'd say (I've never heard of someone being that allergic to anything, crazy).

Two friends (they're siblings) are allergic to TREES and GRASS -- yes, you read right... If one even forgets to take her meds in the morning, she could very well go into anaphalaxis and die by just stepping outside... and she loves playing softball (to her doctor's horror)... :eek:

AToE
04-25-2011, 02:23 AM
Weird! I guess I have heard of some other insane allergies, like one person who was allergic to SUNLIGHT (was told to get a lot of tattoos apparently, not kidding, but also not properly sourced!) and another who was allergic to THEIR OWN SKIN.

Rough!

THawk
04-25-2011, 04:54 AM
Someone I know in the UK was allergic to something in the water treatment... Can't take a shower without medication... :eek:

Smarrikåka
04-25-2011, 05:41 AM
and another who was allergic to THEIR OWN SKIN.

I guess it's not a heavy allergy, or they would have died already? But can this really be categorised as an allergy? Isn't it more like a permanent condition? Or is it only triggered through injestion, i.e. smelling or tasting of own skin?

I know someone who has fishing (I guess mostly fly-fishing) as their BIG passion (think: fishing is to him what mead-making is to us), even though he's allergic to fish (he can't even touch them without using gloves). Not as extreme as the other things mentioned, but it's a bit ironic. Imagine being allergic to mead :p

I wonder if someone could be allergic to allergies, and thereby be allergic to themselves, since they have an allergy against allergies.

Chevette Girl
04-25-2011, 12:26 PM
I guess it's not a heavy allergy, or they would have died already? But can this really be categorised as an allergy? Isn't it more like a permanent condition? Or is it only triggered through injestion, i.e. smelling or tasting of own skin?

I know someone who has fishing (I guess mostly fly-fishing) as their BIG passion (think: fishing is to him what mead-making is to us), even though he's allergic to fish (he can't even touch them without using gloves). Not as extreme as the other things mentioned, but it's a bit ironic. Imagine being allergic to mead :p



I know someone who has to take antihistamines when she gets a hair cut or the cut ends of her hair touching her skin results in hives... and another friend who keeps an aquarium but if she puts her hand in and any of the fish touch her, she gets a welt from the contact.

I own a horse and a rabbit and am allergic to, you guessed it, horses and rabbits (and anything else with fur). <shrug> since mine is not life-threatening, merely annoying, I don't let it get in the way of my life, I just keep fur out of my face and take my steroid inhalers like a good little asthmatic.

However, my friend's sister went into anaphalactic shock once from walking into a room where a potluck was being held and one of the dishes contained peanuts, and one of my good friends actually died a few years ago from anaphalctic shock triggered by mosquito bites (they got him started up again and he's fine now, did you know they actually make an allergy shot for mosquito venom?)

Loadnabox
04-25-2011, 01:28 PM
...and one of my good friends actually died a few years ago from anaphalctic shock triggered by mosquito bites (they got him started up again and he's fine now, did you know they actually make an allergy shot for mosquito venom?)

That would suck. I personally love the outdoors, in fact I plan on sharing my JAO (if it turns out well) with a large group of campers in July. I can't imagine being allergic to mosquitoes, they're freaking everywhere. You'd have to move to Yuma, AZ and even then a few times a year you'd be hosed.

AToE
04-25-2011, 01:38 PM
Man, I thought the friend actually DIED when I was first reading that! :eek:

It's a pet peev of mine when people say they (or someone else) "died" when really all that happened was that they "almost died". Dead is dead, no coming back. Stopped breathing is just that, no heartbeat is just that - both things will certainly lead to death very quickly, but until those cells are dead the person isn't either! The worst part is that even doctors say this about people, and they should really know better.

Rant over now, sorry about that!;D

Chevette Girl
04-25-2011, 01:39 PM
That would suck. I personally love the outdoors, in fact I plan on sharing my JAO (if it turns out well) with a large group of campers in July. I can't imagine being allergic to mosquitoes, they're freaking everywhere. You'd have to move to Yuma, AZ and even then a few times a year you'd be hosed.

We live in Ontario, there is no escaping the skitters, but fortunately, one or two bites won't do it, it takes a couple hundred to get enough venom into him that he reacts. And in theory, the allergy shots help too, he's never had any reaction since dying, he'd had one milder anaphalaxis before he died but they couldn't find the trigger, mosquitos aren't something they normally test for but when he died, they figured it out. He just makes sure he never spends time outdoors farther than half an hour from a hospital.

Chevette Girl
04-25-2011, 06:22 PM
Man, I thought the friend actually DIED when I was first reading that! :eek:


Yeah, well, I'm a little touchy in the opposite direction, since I consider my dad to have died the first time his heart stopped (he was "down" for over 12 minutes) because what came back after he was jump-started had nothing of my dad in it (there was so much brain damage due to swelling from sustained lack of oxygen), the actual date of death was just when the body finally stopped. My friend was actually "down" longer than my dad (long enough for the blood in his legs to start clotting) and it's a complete miracle he's not severely impaired, even the doctors can't explain why his wife isn't a widow.

AToE
04-25-2011, 06:51 PM
Yeah, well, I'm a little touchy in the opposite direction, since I consider my dad to have died the first time his heart stopped (he was "down" for over 12 minutes) because what came back after he was jump-started had nothing of my dad in it (there was so much brain damage due to swelling from sustained lack of oxygen), the actual date of death was just when the body finally stopped. My friend was actually "down" longer than my dad (long enough for the blood in his legs to start clotting) and it's a complete miracle he's not severely impaired, even the doctors can't explain why his wife isn't a widow.

Shoot, I'm sorry to hear that, that's horrible. I consider myself luck that both my parents are still alive, fingers cross they'll stay that way for quite a while.

In that case I would agree with you 100%, that's death. Not when the "official death" was recording, but right at whatever point his brain became irreparabley damaged. Regardless of whether the body keeps going, I consider a human being to be their mind, nothing more, nothing less, so if that's gone then they're dead.

(Which is also why I consider it not-death when someone's heart/lungs stop but they're brough back on-line before severe brain-damage, "they" as in "their minds", never died, just their body came very very close. - But I'll agree to dissagree with you on that one, I certainly do not aim to offend!).

Chevette Girl
04-25-2011, 07:24 PM
Shoot, I'm sorry to hear that, that's horrible. I consider myself luck that both my parents are still alive, fingers cross they'll stay that way for quite a while.

But I'll agree to dissagree with you on that one, I certainly do not aim to offend!).

No offense taken, and I hope your parents (and everyone else who still has some) stay happy and healthy too. It's been nine years now. so I've mostly gotten used to the idea :)

Agree to disagree works fine with me... just to explain my reasoning, I know of three people who have come back after - let's call it "stopping", and all of them were a little different afterwards, sometimes in attitude/personality, sometimes in thought processes, so maybe something did die when they stopped...

And on that morbid note, I'm so glad I only have irritating allergies, not life-threatening ones!

TheAlchemist
05-02-2011, 08:23 PM
...one of my good friends actually died a few years ago from anaphalctic shock triggered by mosquito bites (they got him started up again and he's fine now, did you know they actually make an allergy shot for mosquito venom?)

Did he have an NDE?
Sorry, it's an occupational hazard for me that I take interest in these things.

Loadnabox
05-03-2011, 04:58 PM
Did he have an NDE?
Sorry, it's an occupational hazard for me that I take interest in these things.

You wouldn't want to hear mine, it mostly involved flames and sulfur.

If you're not religious though it's just a crazy tale of what the mind comes up with when it's struggling for resources.

TheAlchemist
05-03-2011, 05:01 PM
You wouldn't want to hear mine...

Actually, I do find NDEs of interest, regardless of the brimstone. Dr. Moody says it's reasonable to guess about 10% of us have had one.

Chevette Girl
05-04-2011, 01:22 AM
Did he have an NDE?
Sorry, it's an occupational hazard for me that I take interest in these things.

I think he did but I've a terrible memory and it was years ago that he told me details...