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veritas
06-30-2011, 10:58 AM
I had posted a thread about what people were listening to. I was mostly just curious to see what types of music people on the board were interested in and find out more about people.

The best part by far though was I found a lot of excellent music I was not familiar with.

So I thought here would be the same opportunity to find out about peoples reading habits genre preferences and Maybe pull a couple good titles to read.

The last book I read was rereading Desert Solitaire by Edward Abbey

A non fiction book based on his time as a park ranger at Arches National Park
Abbey writes about nature his personal adventures and his take on society.
I love this book that's why I re-read it.

Right now I'm reading Terry Goodkind The sword of truth, Wizards first Rule.
Despite reading a lot of negative reviews I'm enjoying it so far.

mccann51
06-30-2011, 11:51 AM
Edward Abbey is a great author. I unfortunately put down Desert Solitaire before I finished it (now it's a "someday" book), but Monkey Wrench Gang is a book of his I've gotten through and really enjoyed.

EDIT: his essays are pretty interesting too. I don't fully agree with the details of what he's saying all the time, but I think his overarching points are good and important to keep in mind, especially as we enter a world more and more dominated by developments and pavement.

Medsen Fey
06-30-2011, 01:03 PM
I'm reading the autobiographical writings of Benjamin Franklin. A bit dry, but very interesting to see how much effort he put into actually trying to prevent the revolutionary war.

Your most humble servant,
Medsen

wildoates
06-30-2011, 01:39 PM
I finished an English translation of Swiss Family Robinson last night, and was surprised to find it quite different from the last one I read some years ago.

AToE
06-30-2011, 02:04 PM
Reading China Meiville right now, Iron Council.



Right now I'm reading Terry Goodkind The sword of truth, Wizards first Rule.
Despite reading a lot of negative reviews I'm enjoying it so far.

I loved his stuff when I was younger, for the first few books anyways. Keep reading until you stop enjoying it, I'm not going to ruin it for you! (And stay AWAY from his website's forum, it will just make you depressed)

Guinlilly
06-30-2011, 02:18 PM
I'm reading 'The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting & Sculpture 1600-1700'. It's a companion book to a National Gallery show that explores the relationship between Spanish devotional sculptures and paintings. How the sculptors and the painters worked together to create 3-dimensional, emotional pieces. It's pretty fascinating. In non-educational reading, I'm rereading David & Leigh Eddings 'The Redemption of Althalus'. ;D

Loadnabox
06-30-2011, 03:49 PM
A relative came out as transgendered to me this week.

My reading has been dominated by their bio of how they got there as well as books to help family members understand what it is.

Yeah not quite what you meant :P

Vernor Vinge rocks though

skunkboy
06-30-2011, 06:11 PM
"The Attack on Pearl Harbor : Strategy, Combat, Myths, Deceptions" and "Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway" and now I have to dig up my copy of Unconditional Surrender Grants memoirs and read those...

SandmanATHF
06-30-2011, 06:15 PM
just got done reading The Gunslinger by Stephen King, getting ready to read the 2nd one in the series. It was pretty good. My friend is in absolute love with the whole Darktower Series, so though I'd give it a go. It's a cool Fantasy book, I'd recommend it if your into Fantasy.

wildoates
06-30-2011, 07:02 PM
I'm rereading David & Leigh Eddings 'The Redemption of Althalus'.

One of the best fantasy books I've ever read. My copy is in pieces from being read so many times. :)

Tannin Boy
06-30-2011, 07:34 PM
The Post Carbon Reader

A bit depressing, but an eye opening read for sure...

TB

Guinlilly
06-30-2011, 08:11 PM
One of the best fantasy books I've ever read. My copy is in pieces from being read so many times. :)

So is mine! All the pages are falling out and dog eared. I tend to read through their books numerous times because I always find new things that I didn't catch before to laugh at.

veritas
06-30-2011, 08:41 PM
I read some of the dark tower stuff pretty cool.


Now I will have to read
David & Leigh Eddings The Redemption of Althalus

kudapucat
06-30-2011, 08:58 PM
Edit: RE Terry Goodkind, Sword Of truth Series


Reading China Meiville right now, Iron Council.



I loved his stuff when I was younger, for the first few books anyways. Keep reading until you stop enjoying it, I'm not going to ruin it for you! (And stay AWAY from his website's forum, it will just make you depressed)

Oh and Do NOT what ever you do watch any of the series "The Seeker" It is a grossly adulteration fo some fine books, and the fact that Goodkind was involved in it, and stayed involved in it has decreased my estimation of the man, although he can write good books.
I loved the series and read up until 2 books after he said he wasn't going to follow Richard and Kahlan (Well that was a bold faced lie - but probably had something to do with public backlash or publisher pressure)
The only reason I stopped reading them I caught up to him, it's a problem I have with a lot of authors, I'm simply not patient enough to wait for them to release the next book, so I put them in cold storage.

Edit: What was Richard's surname? For some reason I'm remember Cyser... which would be grand, but I think it's got more to do with my mead infected mind than actual truth.

kudapucat
06-30-2011, 09:01 PM
As for Me, I'm reading 'Sacred hearbal and healing Beers' to see how such knowledge may be applied to mead.

AToE
06-30-2011, 09:55 PM
Edit: RE Terry Goodkind, Sword Of truth Series



Oh and Do NOT what ever you do watch any of the series "The Seeker" It is a grossly adulteration fo some fine books, and the fact that Goodkind was involved in it, and stayed involved in it has decreased my estimation of the man, although he can write good books.
I loved the series and read up until 2 books after he said he wasn't going to follow Richard and Kahlan (Well that was a bold faced lie - but probably had something to do with public backlash or publisher pressure)
The only reason I stopped reading them I caught up to him, it's a problem I have with a lot of authors, I'm simply not patient enough to wait for them to release the next book, so I put them in cold storage.

Edit: What was Richard's surname? For some reason I'm remember Cyser... which would be grand, but I think it's got more to do with my mead infected mind than actual truth.

Cypress and then Rahl I believe were his surnames.

Nothing Goodkind could do could possibly lower my opinion of him, it's pretty much rock bottom... but like I said, don't let that ruin the first few books that were enjoyable (light stuff, but good light stuff).

Chevette Girl
06-30-2011, 10:27 PM
I remember reading the Gunslinger series in high school... back then I think I read every Stephen King book I could get my hands on!

Currently I keep going back to Mercedes Lackey (yeah, it's kinda fluff but I like the characters and the world setting, it's like watching a favourite movie). Recently finished re-reading most of the Xanth series by Piers Anthony... Most recently though, I've been going through the stuff that was loaded on my e-reader for me, currently re-reading Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman (which I'd be finished now if the battery hadn't died!), am also halfway through one of the Sherlock Holmes books, which after suffering through Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, I am finding quite well written and interesting, and I'd be finished now if I hadn't discovered Good Omens! Yay, bikers of the apocalypse!

Guinlilly
06-30-2011, 11:25 PM
I remember reading the Gunslinger series in high school... back then I think I read every Stephen King book I could get my hands on!

Currently I keep going back to Mercedes Lackey (yeah, it's kinda fluff but I like the characters and the world setting, it's like watching a favourite movie). Recently finished re-reading most of the Xanth series by Piers Anthony... Most recently though, I've been going through the stuff that was loaded on my e-reader for me, currently re-reading Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman (which I'd be finished now if the battery hadn't died!), am also halfway through one of the Sherlock Holmes books, which after suffering through Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, I am finding quite well written and interesting, and I'd be finished now if I hadn't discovered Good Omens! Yay, bikers of the apocalypse!

I ADORE Good Omens. And practically anything Neil Gaiman writes, American Gods is in my top 10 fave books of all time and the Sandman series is amazing.

veritas
07-01-2011, 12:44 AM
[/QUOTE] What was Richard's surname? For some reason I'm remember Cyser... which would be grand, but I think it's got more to do with my mead infected mind than actual truth.[/QUOTE]


surname of Cypher!

kudapucat
07-01-2011, 01:24 AM
surname of Cypher!

That's Right! Another item of useless trivia brought to the top of the stack and spared the eternal damnation of forgetfulness

wayneb
07-01-2011, 10:09 AM
That's Right! Another item of useless trivia brought to the top of the stack and spared the eternal damnation of forgetfulness

And isn't that what the Internet is best for? ;D

icedmetal
07-01-2011, 03:33 PM
Currently re-reading the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan, in anticipation that the final book will be delivered sometime in 2012. I've been through it more times than I can remember, and I still enjoy it every time.

I've read the Sword of Truth series multiple times as well, last time actually completing it since all the books were finally finished. Yes, there's a book or two in there that aren't as interesting as most, but, overall, that series is incredible, and well worth the read. I'll probably hit it up again in a few years.

I've caught little bits and pieces of the Seeker shows, and oh boy, you'd never catch me watching that crap in a million years.

MattHollingsworth
07-01-2011, 04:09 PM
The Fall of Yugoslavia by Misha Glenny. You know, light holiday reading for the beach. ;-)

Started it a couple of years back, rereading it now and about done. Informative book about the whole breakup of Yugoslavia and all the confusing stuff that went on with the war here. Nobody comes out looking good.

Medsen Fey
07-01-2011, 04:34 PM
I read a book some years ago entitled "Balkan Ghosts," (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Balkan-Ghosts/Robert-D-Kaplan/e/9780312424930) a very interesting book. It does an eerie job of explaining the conflicts there, and unfortunately suggests that we have not seen the last of it.

YogiBearMead726
07-01-2011, 06:30 PM
A bunch of brewing and organic chemistry books. I won't bore you with the details. ;)

TheAlchemist
07-01-2011, 08:14 PM
As for Me, I'm reading 'Sacred hearbal and healing Beers' to see how such knowledge may be applied to mead.

Wow. Sounds awesome.

With my ears I'm reading (actually, it's being read to me) Wicked by Gregory Maguire. I can not fathom how they made a G rated musical out of this adult material...

With my eyes I'm reading Robert Moss' Dreamer's Book of the Dead. Highly recommended for Soul Travelers.

EverGreenman
07-02-2011, 12:02 AM
just finished a book that apparently was a NYTimes Bestseller (i'd never heard of it till i saw it on a friend's coffee table) called The Windup Girl. Gripping sci-fi about a future in which GMO Companies have utterly wrecked the Earth's biodiversity through a series of plauges and polical ploys, in which carbon-based feuls have become a thing of the past, and in which religious zealotry is still rampant. It takes place in Thailand, where the kingdom has pretty much isolated itself with a few exceptions... the main characters of course (a white GMO Companyman incognito, a Chinese/Malaysian former tycoon tuned illegal alien, and a genetically engineered Japanese superwoman). I thought it shared a similar aim, message, perception, whatever as The Fifth Sacred Thing by Starawk... just a lot more dark. and eerily more real. Great book though... definitely couldn't put it down (but I spend a lot of time thinking about globalized agriculture and it's reprecussions).

YogiBearMead726
07-02-2011, 12:28 AM
I recently re-read the Bourne Identity trilogy (Identity, Supremecy, and Ultimatum), and they are some of the best, fast-paced, can't-put-down action novels of all time. They are sooooo much better than the Matt Damon movie versions too, which coincidentally stop following the same plot as the books after Bourne looses his memory...:rolleyes:

Oskaar
07-02-2011, 03:21 AM
On book six of the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan. It's a good series and well written. It's also moving along a bit better than earlier in the series and the conflicts are stepping up.

Just finished the first four books of the Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin and those are excellent books. I love that he kills off a lot of the characters in the main book, and starts to transition some of the villains into the direction of being heroes.

Can't wait for Dance with Dragons to come out, and was really enjoying A Game of Thrones on HBO.

I'm going through Metamorphosis by Ovid again in bits and bunches along with some Sophocles and Euripides.

Cheers,

Oskaar

Meriadoc
07-02-2011, 09:54 AM
I've got two things going right now. I'm in the middle of McCullough's "1776", and, when I'm in the mood for fiction, I'm picking up W.E.B. Griffin's "Brotherhood of War" series. It's a lot easier to get through than the stuff I should be reading right now (Dulles, Newman, and the like)...

Meriadoc
07-02-2011, 09:56 AM
Just finished the first four books of the Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin and those are excellent books. I love that he kills off a lot of the characters in the main book, and starts to transition some of the villains into the direction of being heroes.

Can't wait for Dance with Dragons to come out, and was really enjoying A Game of Thrones on HBO.

My brother picked up the first book of the series, and has gotten me hooked on the HBO series. I'm still trying to keep all the families straight, but I've gotta agree with you -- the arcs that some of the characters are taking are surprising and they really draw you into the storyline!

chiguire
07-02-2011, 10:18 AM
Most recent books (within the last month) =

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
Call of the Cthulhu and other Weird Tales by H. P. Lovecraft

kudapucat
07-02-2011, 12:13 PM
just finished a book that apparently was a NYTimes Bestseller (i'd never heard of it till i saw it on a friend's coffee table) called The Windup Girl. Gripping sci-fi about a future in which GMO Companies have utterly wrecked the Earth's biodiversity through a series of plauges and polical ploys, in which carbon-based feuls have become a thing of the past, and in which religious zealotry is still rampant. It takes place in Thailand, where the kingdom has pretty much isolated itself with a few exceptions... the main characters of course (a white GMO Companyman incognito, a Chinese/Malaysian former tycoon tuned illegal alien, and a genetically engineered Japanese superwoman). I thought it shared a similar aim, message, perception, whatever as The Fifth Sacred Thing by Starawk... just a lot more dark. and eerily more real. Great book though... definitely couldn't put it down (but I spend a lot of time thinking about globalized agriculture and it's reprecussions).

I would direct you to Peter F hamilton's "mindstar" series. If you looked this.
I think I need to get this book of which you speak.

MattHollingsworth
07-02-2011, 04:27 PM
I read a book some years ago entitled "Balkan Ghosts," (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Balkan-Ghosts/Robert-D-Kaplan/e/9780312424930) a very interesting book. It does an eerie job of explaining the conflicts there, and unfortunately suggests that we have not seen the last of it.

Yeah, it's sort of a tinderbox here and has been throughout history. We'll see what the future holds. But for now, Croatia is in NATO and will be in the EU in July of 2013, so I feel okay living here. Living here, I'd say that as far as future war nonsense goes, Slovenia is the safest of the former Yugoslav nations, with Croatia not so far behind. I'd say Bosnia and Hercegovina and Kosovo are the most dangerous. Time will tell, of course.

As for other books, I listen to a lot of books while working. The best of the bunch, as far as I'm concerned, is A Clockwork Orange. Worth checking out. If you know any Slavic language, you'll be interested to hear the slang that's mostly Russian based but understandable to most Slavic speakers. And it's explained by context for people who don't speak a Slavic language.

Other books I like: Anything by Cormac McCarthy, especially The Road, Blood Meridian, No Country for Old Men and All the Pretty Horses. Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow by Orson Scott Card. Shantaram, audio book. East of Eden by John Steinbeck. A Prayer for Owen Meaney by John Irving.

Guinlilly
07-02-2011, 04:51 PM
Other books I like: Anything by Cormac McCarthy, especially The Road, Blood Meridian, No Country for Old Men and All the Pretty Horses. Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow by Orson Scott Card. Shantaram, audio book. East of Eden by John Steinbeck. A Prayer for Owen Meaney by John Irving.

Two thumbs waaaay up for the Ender series. Ender's Game is one of my favorite books of all time.

TheAlchemist
07-02-2011, 06:57 PM
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse...

Mmm...loved that one.

TheAlchemist
07-02-2011, 06:59 PM
Yeah! A Prayer for Owen Meaney by John Irving.

Loved Owen Meaney. Give him back!

mccann51
07-02-2011, 08:16 PM
Just finished the first four books of the Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin and those are excellent books. I love that he kills off a lot of the characters in the main book, and starts to transition some of the villains into the direction of being heroes.

Can't wait for Dance with Dragons to come out, and was really enjoying A Game of Thrones on HBO.


I'm pretty excited about the new book, as well. I'm glad I only picked the series up a year ago so the wait hasn't been too long between the fourth and fifth book. And yes, his non-black-and-white approach to "good" and "evil" is refreshing; Jaime has become one of the my favorite characters. In fact, it's this humanistic approach with such an epic backdrop that really makes the series for me.


just finished a book that apparently was a NYTimes Bestseller (i'd never heard of it till i saw it on a friend's coffee table) called The Windup Girl. Gripping sci-fi about a future in which GMO Companies have utterly wrecked the Earth's biodiversity through a series of plauges and polical ploys, in which carbon-based feuls have become a thing of the past, and in which religious zealotry is still rampant. It takes place in Thailand, where the kingdom has pretty much isolated itself with a few exceptions... the main characters of course (a white GMO Companyman incognito, a Chinese/Malaysian former tycoon tuned illegal alien, and a genetically engineered Japanese superwoman). I thought it shared a similar aim, message, perception, whatever as The Fifth Sacred Thing by Starawk... just a lot more dark. and eerily more real. Great book though... definitely couldn't put it down (but I spend a lot of time thinking about globalized agriculture and it's reprecussions).

Sounds interesting; gonna have to check it out.


A bunch of brewing and organic chemistry books. I won't bore you with the details. ;)

Sounds exciting to me, but, well, I guess that's not saying much.

MattHollingsworth
07-03-2011, 01:46 AM
Two thumbs waaaay up for the Ender series. Ender's Game is one of my favorite books of all time.

Yeah, I enjoyed Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow. Think I liked Ender's Shadow even better.

Oh, and Dune. Love me some Dune.

Chevette Girl
07-03-2011, 02:06 AM
Oh, and Dune. Love me some Dune.

That'll get AToE's attention :)

Thanks for all the recommendations, this thread was a great idea!

MattHollingsworth
07-03-2011, 03:25 PM
Loved Owen Meaney. Give him back!

Yeah, great book!


That'll get AToE's attention :)


I'm not getting the acronym. I'm still a noob here! ;-)

Chevette Girl
07-03-2011, 04:52 PM
AToe, the member with a sandworm as his avatar :)

Just finished Hound of the Baskervilles, I must say I am quite enjoying Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's writings.

Guinlilly
07-03-2011, 05:17 PM
AToe, the member with a sandworm as his avatar :)

Just finished Hound of the Baskervilles, I must say I am quite enjoying Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's writings.

Which AToE = A Thing of Eternity which = Dune reference to Shai'Hulud if I remember correctly.

kudapucat
07-03-2011, 06:14 PM
Which AToE = A Thing of Eternity which = Dune reference to Shai'Hulud if I remember correctly.

Ahhh... I knew "AToE (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/member.php?u=18719)" took his name from "A thing of Eternity" which he disclaims as "It's a nerd thing". But I didn't realise the reference was from Dune.
He much love those books more than I realised.

Oskaar
07-03-2011, 07:58 PM
....snip... The best of the bunch, as far as I'm concerned, is A Clockwork Orange..snip....

Yeah me droogen brother, it was real horror-show!

kudapucat
07-04-2011, 12:06 AM
Can ye spare some cutter me brother?

MattHollingsworth
07-04-2011, 01:34 AM
Yeah me droogen brother, it was real horror-show!

Heh heh. Have you read it? The slang is maybe 75% Russian and you can recognize the words from Croatian.

MattHollingsworth
07-04-2011, 01:38 AM
AToe, the member with a sandworm as his avatar :)


Aha! Didn't see him in this thread until just now. With that avatar, it makes sense! ;-)

Oskaar
07-04-2011, 01:55 AM
Heh heh. Have you read it? The slang is maybe 75% Russian and you can recognize the words from Croatian.

Sure have, still have it on my bookshelf. Burgess write some other interesting stuff as well.

MattHollingsworth
07-04-2011, 10:04 AM
Sure have, still have it on my bookshelf. Burgess write some other interesting stuff as well.

Recommend me another of his books, purty please. I've only read the one.

Oskaar
07-04-2011, 11:06 AM
Haha,

Try the Enderby tetrology -- Inside Mr. Enderby (1963), Enderby Outside (1968), The Clockwork Testament (1974), and Enderby's Dark Lady (1984)

Interesting stuff. Kind of James Joyce's Ulysses wrapped up in a poet that works best when seated on his toilet.

LOL, you asked!

Cheers,

Oskaar

AToE
07-04-2011, 12:39 PM
Ha yes, got my attention for sure! A Thing of Eternity is indeed basically what you get if you take the Arabic Shai Hulud and put it into English. I'm something of an amateur Dune scholar and collector. Don't get me started on the new books though, just don't!

On other notes, awesome to see so many people with similar tastes! The Ender series is one I've always meant to get into, I've read one other book by Card and it was awesome - it says a lot about just how good an author is when I can personally dislike the author very much, but still am able to fully enjoy his works! (Unlike Goodkind, who first off I simply got bored of his books when they stopped being books and started being political/social rants that repeated the same statements at least 5-10 times per books, but I kept reading his stuff because I had fond memories of the first 4 books or so... but then I got to know about him as a person and it just ruined it for me... so my advice is simply stay away from learning about him or reading any interviews, and keep enjoying the books!).

A Song of Ice and Fire is awesome, loving it, can't wait for the 5th book.

Clockwork Orange was a killer book too, I've been meaning to re-read it, as I didn't really figure out the language until part way in, so the beginning was a little lost on me, should make more sense next time around!

Other really awesome SF authors:

Iain M Banks - wow, just wow. Start with Player of Games and just read them at random from that point on. Not what my fav of his is yet, either Use of Weapons, or Excession.

Karl Schroeder - killer new(-ish, last 10 years) high-tech SF author, seriously mind exploding stuff. I'd start with Permanence for a more Arthur C Clarke vibe, Lady of Mazes for a "down the rabbit hole" vibe, and if you'd prefer more pulp "entertainment" SF rather than "art" SF, his Virgo series which starts with Sun of Suns is just killer, takes place in a setting so interesting the stories could be about the characters doing laundry and it'd still be rivetting!

Cordwainer Smith - not as well known now as he was way way back when he was writing, but a truely whacky author who's probably one of the best I've ever read. Check out the short story Scanners Live in Vain, the first he published under that name.

Boy, I could go on for hours. ;D

veritas
07-05-2011, 12:54 AM
I'm getting a large list of books to read! I only wish I was a faster reader now. Half way through the first goodkind book. I started to reread The count of Monte cristo another favorite. And im reading Officer one and two and fire essentials 5th edition for my upcoming Lt test. I should be reading a lot more of the latter but I'm not....

Midnight Sun
07-05-2011, 04:55 PM
Hmmm...lots of interesting recommendations.

I am currently reading Thrilled to Death by Dr. Archibald Hart and Ship of Destiny by Robin Hobb. In the queue is the Farseer Trilogy also by Robin Hobb and the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov.

kudapucat
07-05-2011, 06:05 PM
Hmmm...lots of interesting recommendations.

I am currently reading Thrilled to Death by Dr. Archibald Hart and Ship of Destiny by Robin Hobb. In the queue is the Farseer Trilogy also by Robin Hobb and the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov.

There's 3 trilogies in the same timeline as Ship of Destiny... They were great, I really enjoyed them. I can't remember the 3rd trilogy though...

Ship of destiny was book 1 of the liveship traders?
Farseer Trilogy. Is that the assassin's apprentice books?
wracking my brain to remember what the 3rd series was about it's in the same country as the farseers

Guinlilly
07-05-2011, 06:43 PM
I'm getting a large list of books to read! I only wish I was a faster reader now. Half way through the first goodkind book. I started to reread The count of Monte cristo another favorite. And im reading Officer one and two and fire essentials 5th edition for my upcoming Lt test. I should be reading a lot more of the latter but I'm not....

I had to read The Count of Monte Cristo in French in high school, it kind of put me off reading it in English, which is sad because it seems like a really good book.

Medsen Fey
07-05-2011, 07:00 PM
I recently read The Knight of Sainte-Hermine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Knight_of_Sainte-Hermine) which is a Dumas work that was recently re-discovered (you wouldn't think anything that he has serialized would have been lost in the first place - French librarians... :) ). The story is fun, but not as good as the Count of Montecristo, and being unfinished, it kind of leaves you hanging.

Chevette Girl
07-05-2011, 07:40 PM
I started to reread The count of Monte cristo another favorite.

Ooh, I guess I should read that too then, I saw the title on my e-reader. When I'm done with Sherlock Holmes, maybe. (I keep asking myself, why didn't they have us read stuff like that in high school English classes instead of the dreck I remember, The Red Pony, ugh, haven't ever been able to bring myself to read anything else by Steinbeck since, although later in high school when they made us read a horrible novel, I'd go track down something esle by the same author to see if it was ALL dreck or if my school board just chose a dud)

Midnight Sun
07-05-2011, 07:54 PM
kudapucat, Ship of Destiny is the last in the Liveship Traders Trilogy. I have liked this trilogy quite a bit which is what is leading me toward the Farseer Trilogy (assassin's apprentice). I'm certainly interested in the rest of her books, Ill have to see if the library has them.

caffeine211
07-05-2011, 10:23 PM
I'm working on my annual reading of the Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald, my favorite book ever.

Typically, though, I read early to mid twentieth century American lit. There's a lot of great stuff from that era. After that I go for Russian lit (novels, short stories, plays, poetry, etc.... pretty much anything).

Chuck Palahniuk is also one of my favorite writers, more for his story telling ability than his actual writing.

AToE, I'd like to hear your opinion of the new Dune books... I've read the original about 20 times (and the original series about 3 times). I used to have a first print of Dune that an ex gave to me as a xmas gift but it got ruined (read: destroyed, obliterated) in a flood :crybaby2:.

AToE
07-06-2011, 12:01 AM
AToE, I'd like to hear your opinion of the new Dune books... I've read the original about 20 times (and the original series about 3 times). I used to have a first print of Dune that an ex gave to me as a xmas gift but it got ruined (read: destroyed, obliterated) in a flood :crybaby2:.

Alright, but I warned you!

Ok, here's the scoop. I'm going to outline this for everyone who's not up on this business, you (who've read them) obviously will know what I'm talking about.

You have the first 3 books, Dune, Dune Messiah and Children of Dune. These were what Frank Herbert had originally envisioned as the full story (dispite the fact that Leto II's "Golden Path" isn't explained at all in the 3rd book, FH apparently wanted to originally leave it entirely up to people's imaginations. It's fairly obvious that the GP is some sort of plan to save the human race, but nothing is said about it's details) This is sort of a Lord of the Rings situation, FH thought of those 3 books as truely being just 1 book.

Then there's God Emperor of Dune, basically a standalone in the "timeline" of the original 6 books. This is generally the favourite book of Dune scholars for it's insane depth, and frankly some of the best characterization work ever done by any author when looking at the character of the God Emperor himself. This books is set thousands of years after the first 3. (More of the Golden Path is explained in this book, but it's not really fully understandable until the next book... even then it requires serious thought to decypher)

Then we have Heretics of Dune and Chapterhouse Dune, set around 1500 years IIRC after GEoD, and a fairly big departure in style from the earlier books. The story at the end of Chapterhouse is debatably a cliffhanger, though many do agree it would be a fine ending in and of itself. (Also of note is that FH essentially wrote the last 3 books because he was offered just insane amounts of money to do so, we have this from a good friend of his (the chap who authored the Dune Encyclopedia), but that in no way diminished what amazing works of art they are, especially GEoD).

FH did intend to write a final 7th book to finish the plotline of Heretics and Chapterhouse, but sadly died before making any real progress on it.


Fast forward to 11 years ago. Frank Herberts son, Brian, claims to find a lockbox containing outlines for book 7 (never has been released, dispite much heartfelt pleading with the HLP, the folks who own the rights to Dune. I've personally been involved in much of this struggle with the HLP over the last 4 or 5 years). He brings on another author to help him write new books, Kevin J Anderson, an author known quite frankly for writing in universes he didn't create (Star Wars, Batman, Starcraft, etc... man I think the Star Wars people almost dispise him more than we do!) and ruining them (super-Jedi, storylines that contract and mock other authors from the series' work, 100% flat characterization, bad plots, bad everything. He's all about pew-pew lazer fights, evil robots, bad guys with names that sound evil, and above all else, ever escallating super-weapons).

They decided to release many books before writing Dune 7 itself.

The results started out fairly mediocre with the release of the House series, which takes place basically right before the original Dune trilogy. There were loads and loads of inconsistancies (these 2 do zero work checking their stuff against the original books), weak writing, but nothing to get too crazy about.

Then we have the Legends series, which is set back during the Butlerian Jihad (meant to be a battle against the machine mentality that robs us of our humanity, those humans who use machines to enslave other humans, etc, it was to be a serious philosophical war.... KJA and BH made it into a Terminator style story). This series was the first of theirs I personally read after the original 6 books, and I honestly almost cried because it was so bad, I hadn't yet learned to dispise the new authors, it was just that bad.

This Legends series is also where they set up the plot for the finale of FH's original series, Dune 7 (I know, that makes no sense right? Without spoiling their horrible ending, let's just say it makes actually LESS than no sense!).

PART TWO OF MY EPIC RANT COMING NEXT

AToE
07-06-2011, 12:17 AM
AND ON WITH MY RANT!

Ok, so that series was bad, really bad, like epic bad. Seriously I have read better writing from Jr High students, no hyperbole!

Then we have Dune 7... oh lords what have KJA and BH done?! (You'll notice KJA's name is always first in my naming of them, he is believed to essentially do all the writing. Where Frank Herbert put years into his books, KJA puts WEEKS. I'm not kidding, he's very proud of how he can write 14 books a year and brags about it all the time).

They split it into 2 books, and just utterly destroy all the great characters FH created, completely contradict the original books in at least 1 way per page (actually contradict their own writing sometimes too...), and worst of all, they utterly destroy all the deep philosophy of FH's books. (For those who haven't read them, the Dune series is DEEPLY philosophical, polical and social commentary are huge in them, ecology, use of religion, the depth is nearly endless. Almost a half a century later we're still unwraveling all the secret messages in the books).

When I read that final book it was the first time in my life I actually regretted having read a book.

Then they wrote a couple books that fit INBETWEEN the books of the original series by FH, because apparently those books needed extra explaining. (They also put in a little jab us naysayers by putting a line into one of the latest books that says all their contradictions take precidence over FH's original books, they've now changed it so that FH's books are "in universe histories" and are innaccurate... so any time they say a character's hair was blonde and FH said black, they're right, FH was wrong. Again, I'm NOT making this up...) This series of "interquils" flopped and they have abandoned it, though they claim it wasn't due to sales drops, and that they will return to it.

Now they're writing stories going back to just after the Jihad, about how the Bene Gesserit formed, the Mentats, the Spacing Guild, etc. I'm sure they'll be just awesome. ;) (Also interesting to note, that FH wrote 6 Dune books, to date they have written 11 including the one about to be released, total including those they've announced they will write will bring the total of their books to I think 15, and then after that it's hoped that they just might, MIGHT stop)



Anyways, sorry for the rant. I am very personally involved with this, I've spoken over the internet with FH's grandson Byron many times (he runs the offical Dune forum, which is pretty much a dead forum, maybe a handful of posts a week), we started as friends, then politely dissagreed with eachother, then he banned me (and a lot of others) from that website. We now all post and chat about Dune at www.jacurutu.com

This goes deeper than just disliking the new books. Their refusal to release the "notes" is very bad, basically an admittance that if any notes exist they certainly didn't follow them. They have also committed many agressive and unwarranted acts against Dune fans who never uttered a single negative word about the new books (an amateur film group in Spain made a fan film of Dune, took them years, they were planning on just releasing it for free... the HLP sent their lawyers after them, threatened to ruin their lives if they released it and made them also remove all trailers, pictures, ANYTHING from the internet itself...).

There's a lot more too this, and I'm sure they have their side as well, and I'm sure Byron is a great person who's just caught between his family and us (we're known as the OH, the "Orthodox Herbertarians) - he's actually hinted several times that he also is not happy with what has been done to a once revered work of art, but cannot say so publicly.

They basically drew all over the Mona Lisa with crayons, or turned a great Mozzart piece into a piece of pop music, or served out McDonalds calling it fine French cuisine. :(

MattHollingsworth
07-06-2011, 01:39 AM
Ooh, I guess I should read that too then, I saw the title on my e-reader. When I'm done with Sherlock Holmes, maybe. (I keep asking myself, why didn't they have us read stuff like that in high school English classes instead of the dreck I remember, The Red Pony, ugh, haven't ever been able to bring myself to read anything else by Steinbeck since, although later in high school when they made us read a horrible novel, I'd go track down something esle by the same author to see if it was ALL dreck or if my school board just chose a dud)

Of Mice and Men and East of Eden by Steinbeck are really great.

MattHollingsworth
07-06-2011, 01:59 AM
Ha yes, got my attention for sure! A Thing of Eternity is indeed basically what you get if you take the Arabic Shai Hulud and put it into English. I'm something of an amateur Dune scholar and collector. Don't get me started on the new books though, just don't!

On other notes, awesome to see so many people with similar tastes! The Ender series is one I've always meant to get into, I've read one other book by Card and it was awesome - it says a lot about just how good an author is when I can personally dislike the author very much, but still am able to fully enjoy his works! (Unlike Goodkind, who first off I simply got bored of his books when they stopped being books and started being political/social rants that repeated the same statements at least 5-10 times per books, but I kept reading his stuff because I had fond memories of the first 4 books or so... but then I got to know about him as a person and it just ruined it for me... so my advice is simply stay away from learning about him or reading any interviews, and keep enjoying the books!).

A Song of Ice and Fire is awesome, loving it, can't wait for the 5th book.

Clockwork Orange was a killer book too, I've been meaning to re-read it, as I didn't really figure out the language until part way in, so the beginning was a little lost on me, should make more sense next time around!

Other really awesome SF authors:

Iain M Banks - wow, just wow. Start with Player of Games and just read them at random from that point on. Not what my fav of his is yet, either Use of Weapons, or Excession.

Karl Schroeder - killer new(-ish, last 10 years) high-tech SF author, seriously mind exploding stuff. I'd start with Permanence for a more Arthur C Clarke vibe, Lady of Mazes for a "down the rabbit hole" vibe, and if you'd prefer more pulp "entertainment" SF rather than "art" SF, his Virgo series which starts with Sun of Suns is just killer, takes place in a setting so interesting the stories could be about the characters doing laundry and it'd still be rivetting!

Cordwainer Smith - not as well known now as he was way way back when he was writing, but a truely whacky author who's probably one of the best I've ever read. Check out the short story Scanners Live in Vain, the first he published under that name.

Boy, I could go on for hours. ;D

Thanks for all the book ideas.

As for the Dune books written by others, I would always shy away from sequels written by someone other than the original writer. Just doesn't seem like a good idea. Wasn't surprised to read what you said about them. As for me, I've only read the first 3 of the original series. Haven't started the last 3 yet.

AToE
07-06-2011, 02:22 AM
The best way I've heard the new books described, is imagine if someone wrote a sequel to LoTR where it turned out the moral of the story was all wrong, humans actually need to go get that ring back, power doesn't corrupt.

Chris Tolkien has done a perfect job though, he's released all the notes, he's made stories out of them yes, but truely to the best of his ability, and he's been totally transparent about the process. He's actually out to preserve his father's legacy.

kudapucat
07-06-2011, 05:45 AM
kudapucat, Ship of Destiny is the last in the Liveship Traders Trilogy. I have liked this trilogy quite a bit which is what is leading me toward the Farseer Trilogy (assassin's apprentice). I'm certainly interested in the rest of her books, Ill have to see if the library has them.

I'll look on the shelf later and see if I can't find the series I mean.

TheAlchemist
07-06-2011, 09:39 AM
On the Steinbeck subject, I loved Grapes of Wrath. It answers the question "Why are there Labor Unions?" pretty well. The Pearl, an interesting morality tale. Cannery Row wasn't my favorite. Adored Travels with Charley, though...imagine an author being able to travel incognito in the age of the internet...that would be a challenge.

Medsen Fey
07-06-2011, 10:03 AM
When I read that final book it was the first time in my life I actually regretted having read a book.



When I'm done with Sherlock Holmes, maybe.

I love Sherlock Holmes stories. They are great. Arthur Conan Doyle was a physician and they say the character of Holmes was patterned off a medical professor that Doyle trained with. Apparently this physician was an astute observer, and when presented with a new patient, he could look at the person's hands, clothes, and face and be able to tell you all kinds of things about their work and habits.

AToE, what you said made me chuckle as I remember a line from Sherlock Holmes where he says:



"You see," he explained, "I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones."


I suppose that same rule applies to bad literature, and one has to be careful what one puts in one's brain. You can't get it back out. ;D

So it is with some small embarrassment that I have to confess that I just finished reading "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows." I'd read all the others and figured I should finish the story. I've been troubled by the dark turn this series took after the 3rd book and I really didn't enjoy books 5 and 6. This one was better, but I'm kind of glad the story is over (at least I hope it is).

TheAlchemist
07-06-2011, 10:46 AM
I love Sherlock Holmes stories. They are great. Arthur Conan Doyle was a physician and they say the character of Holmes was patterned off a medical professor that Doyle trained with. Apparently this physician was an astute observer, and when presented with a new patient, he could look at the person's hands, clothes, and face and be able to tell you all kinds of things about their work and habits.


So it is with some small embarrassment that I have to confess that I just finished reading "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows." I'd read all the others and figured I should finish the story. I've been troubled by the dark turn this series took after the 3rd book and I really didn't enjoy books 5 and 6. This one was better, but I'm kind of glad the story is over (at least I hope it is).

I adore physician authors. Somerset Maugham, Walker Percy, Lewis Thomas...

Are you gearing up for the final Harry Potter film?

Chevette Girl
07-06-2011, 02:41 PM
Of Mice and Men and East of Eden by Steinbeck are really great.

I'll have to take your word on it, can't make myself do it... maybe a couple more years and I'll get over The Red Pony...

And I think being forced to submit to The Great Gatsby (they made us watch the movie too, ughhhh) turned me right off reading any more of his as well... Sorry, Caffeine211, I just can't make myself be interested in that era... I'm no good reading books where I have no respect for / no interest in any of the characters, had the same problem with Gone With The Wind, Sense and Sensibility and Bonfire of the Vanities, all books I read because I thought I should, since they're supposed to be classics and I've had people tell me how great they were... For some reason I was OK with To Kill a Mockingbird...



So it is with some small embarrassment that I have to confess that I just finished reading "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows." I'd read all the others and figured I should finish the story. I've been troubled by the dark turn this series took after the 3rd book and I really didn't enjoy books 5 and 6. This one was better, but I'm kind of glad the story is over (at least I hope it is).

You know, I did find some of the later books to be disturbingly dark, now that you mention it... I enjoyed the story overall, but some parts were really depressing. I very much enjoyed the first book and because I like the characters, I had to find out what happens to them :)

AToE
07-06-2011, 04:09 PM
I
AToE, what you said made me chuckle as I remember a line from Sherlock Holmes where he says:


Ha, that reminds me of an Einstein quote where he says something like "never memorize anything you can just look up later"!


If you want to avoid dark stories I'd stay far away from A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones being the first book). I read a lot of dark stuff, and that series seems to outdo pretty much everything else I've read by a long shot.




Also, in case anyone thinks I'm nuts because of that Dune rant, understand the bulk of the conflict happened years ago, I'm not angry anymore, just a little sad. Some people are still in a rage though, they're not letting go any time soon!

caffeine211
07-06-2011, 10:33 PM
When I read that final book it was the first time in my life I actually regretted having read a book.

Well that was a little more intense than I expected but yeah... I read them just because but it was brutal.

TheAlchemist
07-06-2011, 10:42 PM
I'm no good reading books where I have no respect for / no interest in any of the characters, had the same problem with...Bonfire of the Vanities... books I read because I thought I should...

I almost never decide it's OK for me to just put a book down. Permanently. Bonfire was one such exception.

MattHollingsworth
07-07-2011, 01:18 AM
If you want to avoid dark stories I'd stay far away from A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones being the first book). I read a lot of dark stuff, and that series seems to outdo pretty much everything else I've read by a long shot.

Didn't read A Song of Ice and Fire (though saw the show, which was *ok* but not great, IMHO), but if you want really dark, read Blood Meridian or The Road by Cormac McCarthy.

;-)

Oskaar
07-07-2011, 01:38 AM
Didn't read A Song of Ice and Fire (though saw the show, which was *ok* but not great, IMHO), but if you want really dark, read Blood Meridian or The Road by Cormac McCarthy.

;-)

I have the collected works of Edgar Allen Poe. Great, dark, inspiring and beautifully written!

Cheers,

Oskaar

wildoates
07-07-2011, 02:14 AM
I'm not a huge fan of Poe, but nevertheless, I can't resist him, for all the reasons you state, Pete. :)

One of our family names is Usher--had a great great whose name was Usher Tucker, an awesome name--but none of us can bring ourselves to use it.

You know why. :)

kudapucat
07-07-2011, 03:33 AM
I almost never decide it's OK for me to just put a book down. Permanently. Bonfire was one such exception.

I feel the same way... The Name of the Rose and the Simarillion are the only ones to beat me so far.

MattHollingsworth
07-07-2011, 03:34 AM
I'll have to take your word on it, can't make myself do it... maybe a couple more years and I'll get over The Red Pony...

I've never even heard of The Red Pony, so don't think it's known as one of his better books. But I can understand the scarring from a book! ;-)


I have the collected works of Edgar Allen Poe. Great, dark, inspiring and beautifully written!

Cheers,

Oskaar

Poe's always good. Haven't read him in some years though.

mccann51
07-07-2011, 03:37 PM
Didn't read A Song of Ice and Fire (though saw the show, which was *ok* but not great, IMHO), but if you want really dark, read Blood Meridian or The Road by Cormac McCarthy.

;-)

Don't judge the books by the show; the books have so much more depth and are far better executed. I agree, the show is "meh".

I enjoyed The Road quite a bit, definitely very dark; the basement scene was not something I had wanted to read right before heading to bed, haha. The Road is one of the few instances where I feel the movie was on par with the book.

I keep hearing about Blood Meridian and am eager to read it when I get a chance.

AToE
07-07-2011, 05:46 PM
I thought they did a really good job on the Game of Thrones show, it's just inevitable that you can't acheive the same quality on screen. They did the best that was possible other than a few weird changes in my personal opinion.


Well that was a little more intense than I expected but yeah... I read them just because but it was brutal.

Ha... yeah that's pretty much everyone's response to the new books of those I've talked to.

That "regretted reading" comment really only applies to the final "Dune 7" book Sandworms of Dune though. The rest were really just hilarioussad flops, but that's the book where they really undid everything FH was trying to teach the readers.

Chevette Girl
07-07-2011, 09:30 PM
I feel the same way... The Name of the Rose and the Simarillion are the only ones to beat me so far.

The Silmarillion (two pages), one short story in Piers Anthony's Anthonology (something about Captain Shetland) (about three paragraphs) and anything I've ever tried to read by Anne McCaffrey (never more than a chapter)... I will compulsively read almost anything to completion. Just not these.


I've never even heard of The Red Pony, so don't think it's known as one of his better books. But I can understand the scarring from a book! ;-)

It's a book about a kid on a farm where nothing ever happens except he gets a pony and it dies of strangles (kinda like mumps for horses) in the first chapter and is never mentioned again. My husband almost got kicked out of his high school English class because his "letter to the author" project went along the lines of, "Dear Mr. Steinbeck, Judging by your novel, The Red Pony, you are obviously in bad need of a good editor, might I offer my services?"

kudapucat
07-08-2011, 12:36 AM
Hah! I read Anne McAffrey's dragon series from first book to last without a break. Interesting how ppl differ eh?

wildoates
07-08-2011, 03:10 AM
Not only that but every few years I do it again. :)

MattHollingsworth
07-08-2011, 06:37 AM
Don't judge the books by the show; the books have so much more depth and are far better executed. I agree, the show is "meh".

I enjoyed The Road quite a bit, definitely very dark; the basement scene was not something I had wanted to read right before heading to bed, haha. The Road is one of the few instances where I feel the movie was on par with the book.

I keep hearing about Blood Meridian and am eager to read it when I get a chance.

I don't judge the books by the show. I ultimately did enjoy parts of the show. But they made a lot of decisions that were sort of weird, skipping over a lot of dramatic moments, not showing battles (budget concerns?) and the pace of the show was pretty glacial. I don't wanna post spoilers, but overall I think they could have done a bit better with the show. The cast was awesome though. And it's not like I'm all into battles or anything. But sometimes a dramatic moment would build up, then they'd just cut to the aftermath and I'd be sitting there wondering why the hell they made that choice.

Yeah, The Road's got some creepy stuff. So does Blood Meridian. Blood Meridian's a tougher read though. His use of language is great, but sometimes takes some digesting (like his hero, Faulkner).


I thought they did a really good job on the Game of Thrones show, it's just inevitable that you can't acheive the same quality on screen. They did the best that was possible other than a few weird changes in my personal opinion.

Like I said above, I just had a problem with SOME elements. The glacial pace was a major bummer for me. The cast and look and direction was all great though.

One thing that I'd guess is in the books is all the palace intrigue. And while some of it was good, I didn't find that stuff that interesting for the most part. And it's a major part of the story, so that wasn't really my cup of tea either. I liked the little girl and Tyrion Lannister (spelling?) the best though. Both really great.

MattHollingsworth
07-08-2011, 06:42 AM
It's a book about a kid on a farm where nothing ever happens except he gets a pony and it dies of strangles (kinda like mumps for horses) in the first chapter and is never mentioned again. My husband almost got kicked out of his high school English class because his "letter to the author" project went along the lines of, "Dear Mr. Steinbeck, Judging by your novel, The Red Pony, you are obviously in bad need of a good editor, might I offer my services?"[/QUOTE]

Looked up on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Red_Pony

Seems it was four separate stories originally published in magazines, some years apart. Doesn't sound like his best work, but I didn't have to suffer through it. I'd stand by East of Eden and Of Mice and Men any day though.

TheAlchemist
07-08-2011, 08:20 AM
I feel the same way... The Name of the Rose and the Simarillion are the only ones to beat me so far.

I liked Name of the Rose...go figure. Maybe it's my monastic soul?

TheAlchemist
07-08-2011, 08:27 AM
...Anne McCaffrey...

Never even heard of her before, until the SciFi thread here.Took out an audiobook of hers and enjoyed that in an historical time of rare strong women characters, she wrote some...kinda liked it, actually.



"Dear Mr. Steinbeck, Judging by your novel, The Red Pony, you are obviously in bad need of a good editor, might I offer my services?"

Ha! You got yourself a ballsey man! Good on ya, mate.

AToE
07-08-2011, 01:27 PM
Anne McCaffrey was a huge part of my childhood, I keep meaning to revisit those books but just haven't done it yet.

AToE
07-08-2011, 01:29 PM
Like I said above, I just had a problem with SOME elements. The glacial pace was a major bummer for me. The cast and look and direction was all great though.


I was a little concerned that the slow pace would bother some viewers, in the book it's also pretty slow, but there's all the details that you miss in the show that keep it interesting. The whole first book is really just the set-up for the real story, kinda like the first bit of the first LOTR book, definitely slower. I think most of the battles were off-screen in the book as well though.

Book 2 is when it really gets going.

Tyrion and Arya would also be my favourite characters, Jon Snow is up there too.

Chevette Girl
07-08-2011, 06:12 PM
[COLOR="Purple"]
Seems it was four separate stories originally published in magazines, some years apart. Doesn't sound like his best work, but I didn't have to suffer through it. I'd stand by East of Eden and Of Mice and Men any day though.


You know, if they'd TOLD US THAT, I might have looked at it a little differently... there was no internet when I was in high school... I fully blame the school board for that though. It's like they didn't WANT us to like reading... If I ever trip over "Of Mice and Men" I may pick it up...

mccann51
07-08-2011, 09:16 PM
I was a little concerned that the slow pace would bother some viewers, in the book it's also pretty slow, but there's all the details that you miss in the show that keep it interesting. The whole first book is really just the set-up for the real story, kinda like the first bit of the first LOTR book, definitely slower. I think most of the battles were off-screen in the book as well though.

Book 2 is when it really gets going.

Tyrion and Arya would also be my favourite characters, Jon Snow is up there too.

It's true. The whole time I was watching it with my girlfriend, who's only read the first book, I'd be thinking of something a few books ahead, but realizing I'd be spoiling it by mentioning it.

I also agree that it's the detail and depth he puts into the books that makes them so good, which is the reason I just couldn't appreciate the show. It just doesn't seem like a story intended for the media of television. And, as you stated in a previous post, some of the little things they changed were just strange and seemed unnecessary.

I also, also agree, Tyrion and Arya are up there as my favorite characters, with Jaime and Jon Snow following up.



On another note, I've been reading Microcosmos (http://www.amazon.com/Microcosmos-Billion-Years-Microbial-Evolution/dp/0520210646) by Lynn Margulis (the biologist who came up with the endo-symbiotic theory of how mitochondria and chloroplasts ended up in eukaryotic cells) and her son Dorian Sagan. It's been a really enlightening read, one of these consciousness raisers, opening up a world of appreciation for our often-overlooked, prokaryotic cohabitants. I think as brewers, a lot of people on these forums would appreciate it.

TheAlchemist
07-09-2011, 12:12 PM
On another note, I've been reading Microcosmos (http://www.amazon.com/Microcosmos-Billion-Years-Microbial-Evolution/dp/0520210646) by Lynn Margulis (the biologist who came up with the endo-symbiotic theory of how mitochondria and chloroplasts ended up in eukaryotic cells) and her son Dorian Sagan. It's been a really enlightening read, one of these consciousness raisers, opening up a world of appreciation for our often-overlooked, prokaryotic cohabitants. I think as brewers, a lot of people on these forums would appreciate it.

God bless the mitochondria. I can't move without them.

AToE
07-10-2011, 04:35 PM
I also, also agree, Tyrion and Arya are up there as my favorite characters, with Jaime and Jon Snow following up.




If you liked Jaime then I'd highly recommend the books, his character ends up having probably more depth than almost any other character in the books, the author really delves deeply into why he is who he is... some of the best characterization I've ever read.

Oskaar
07-10-2011, 05:25 PM
If you liked Jaime then I'd highly recommend the books, his character ends up having probably more depth than almost any other character in the books, the author really delves deeply into why he is who he is... some of the best characterization I've ever read.

Agreed. It also looks like Bran is going to stepping up into a very interesting role in the next books as well. I also like the Brienne character who will be introduced in the next series for HBO as she is largely influential on Jaime's development.

Cheers,

Oskaar

storm1969
07-10-2011, 06:02 PM
Just finished Dan Abnett's "Embedded". Very good. Shows he has a lot of talent and can write outside the Warhammer stuff.

mccann51
07-10-2011, 06:06 PM
If you liked Jaime then I'd highly recommend the books, his character ends up having probably more depth than almost any other character in the books, the author really delves deeply into why he is who he is... some of the best characterization I've ever read.

Good recommendation, I loved the books! Haha!



EDIT: on a serious note, based on your espousings, I've been looking into finding a copy of Dune; looking forward to reading it. Cheers.

AToE
07-10-2011, 06:12 PM
Good recommendation, I loved the books! Haha!



EDIT: on a serious note, based on your espousings, I've been looking into finding a copy of Dune; looking forward to reading it. Cheers.

Hope you enjoy it, it's not your typical Science Fiction fare at all, it's almost more of a fantasy novel in the way it's written. Keep in mind throughout it that 2 of the major themes are ecology and the danger of putting too much power into a leader, because leaders are humans who make mistakes too )that second point isn't actually really made in Dune, it's made in the second book - but still, keep it in mind).

Happy to answer any questions too of course! ;D

storm1969
07-10-2011, 06:50 PM
Currently reading "At Empire's Edge" by William Dietz. Good read so far.

storm1969
07-10-2011, 07:07 PM
Anne McCaffrey was a huge part of my childhood, I keep meaning to revisit those books but just haven't done it yet.

Anne McCaffrey is one of the greats. Right up there with Heinlein (if you haven't, read everything he has wrote), Tolkien, Niven/Pournelle, Weber, and Simon Green.

skunkboy
07-11-2011, 07:56 PM
Anne McCaffrey is one of the greats. Right up there with Heinlein (if you haven't, read everything he has wrote), Tolkien, Niven/Pournelle, Weber, and Simon Green.

Are Niven's later works, say after 1990, any good? I don't think I have read anything by him since the third ringworld book....

storm1969
07-12-2011, 06:25 PM
Are Niven's later works, say after 1990, any good? I don't think I have read anything by him since the third ringworld book....

Actual, by himself, not that much of a fan. But writing with Pournelle, one of my favorites. Nice guys, too. Met them last year at the con I am on the committee of, got to chat with them for a half hour or so.

AToE
07-12-2011, 07:27 PM
Anne McCaffrey is one of the greats. Right up there with Heinlein (if you haven't, read everything he has wrote), Tolkien, Niven/Pournelle, Weber, and Simon Green.

I'm still working on Heinlein, obviously a great but not my favourite so far, I'm more of a Joe Haldeman guy when it comes to the Military SF (he wrote The Forever War, which is considered sort of the antithesis to Starship Troopers). Not that I'm disliking his works, just not my favourites, right now I'm reading his stuff mostly for the academic sake of it.

Niven I'm not a huge fan of on his own (Edit: HA! Funny, I wrote that before I read your last post Storm!), but then again I've yet to get the Ringworld series so I'm probably missing a lot, but when he teams up with Pournelle (Mote books) it's awesome for sure.

I'm definitely a fan of many of the huge greats of the genre, Frank Herbert, Issaac Asimov (not a great writer, but a great visionary), Arthur C Clarke, Ursula K Le Guin, Verne... Poe actually wrote some excellent early Science Fiction as well.

TheAlchemist
07-16-2011, 11:09 AM
Native Son by Richard Wright

Chevette Girl
07-26-2011, 12:04 AM
I have moved on to "Pride and Prejudice" and am enjoying it more than I thought I would. I actually like and/or respect some of the characters in this one!

Also plowing my way through "The Authoritatians" (http://members.shaw.ca/jeanaltemeyer/drbob/TheAuthoritarians.pdf), which will probably result in my pulling the Bible of the shelf yet again...

MattHollingsworth
07-26-2011, 02:24 AM
I'm midway through Battle Cry of Freedom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_Cry_of_Freedom_%28book%29). It's an extensive history of the American Civil War. Great.

skunkboy
07-31-2011, 06:23 PM
I'm reading 'The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting & Sculpture 1600-1700'. It's a companion book to a National Gallery show that explores the relationship between Spanish devotional sculptures and paintings. How the sculptors and the painters worked together to create 3-dimensional, emotional pieces. It's pretty fascinating. In non-educational reading, I'm rereading David & Leigh Eddings 'The Redemption of Althalus'. ;D

I just picked up a copy of the 'The Redemption of Althalus", nice book... ;-)

AToE
07-31-2011, 06:38 PM
I'm still working on A Dance With Dragons, probably 3/4 of the way through it now, or maybe closer to 2/3.

ZwolfUpir
07-31-2011, 08:30 PM
A friend of mine works for a small publishing company called Variance Publishing and they have an author I have been enjoying lately by the name of Jeremy Robinson, he's written a series of books called "Chess Team" and I am currently reading "Instinct". The Chess Team is a Delta team that goes on special missions. Normally not my kind of book, but they encounter mythological things as their problems in our real world where people don't believe in that stuff anymore. Like in the first one, "Pulse" they deal with a Hydra that is resurrected by science after the Hydra's head is found. He also wrote another book I enjoyed called "Antarktos Rising", it doesn't have the Chess Team and there are a few plot holes, but it was a fun and quick read.

TheAlchemist
08-06-2011, 08:40 PM
Lord Have Mercy!
While I'm still slogging my way through Richard Wright's Native Son, I find that my hand keeps picking up literature on race, on Africa, on African descent, on slavery, on the attempted blending or the failure of blending cultures...Barbara Kingsolver's Poisonwood Bible, Mark Twain's Huck Finn, Alan Paton's Cry the Beloved Country, Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Joyce Carol Oates's Black Girl White Girl...

TheAlchemist
08-06-2011, 08:51 PM
Plus...I'm arrested by the cover of Roger Housden's Chasing Rumi.

Jelaluddin Rumi, born in 1207, says:

All the particles of the world
Are in love and looking for lovers

He's a poet, but he's got his finger on the pulse of organic chemistry...like Fredrich Kekule dreaming up the ouroboros-like structure of the benzene ring.

I take it home with me and drink it (plus one glass of Kurpiowski Royal Mead...Happy National Mead Day!)all up in one sitting. Turns out to have been a tasty little dismemberment journey/soul retrieval/ darkness retreat/vision quest all rolled up into one.

Chevette Girl
08-07-2011, 01:24 AM
So this summer's theme seems to be "classics" for me...

I actually enjoyed "Pride and Prejudice". Much better than "Sense and Sensibility".

Got into my mother in law's SF collection while we were in Sudbury, "Beyond the Horizon" and "Methuselah's Children" from Heinlen, started on "A Tale of Two Cities" and got halfway through the Book of Genesis (Good News Bible, I blame AToE for that one) and am making horrid notes on it... Also read "Childhood's End" by Arthur C Clarke. I think I enjoyed his biographical blurb at the end of the book as much as I enjoyed the story... his comment on having become temporarily paralyzed by whacking his head on a doorframe during the height of the polio epidemic, "I highly recommend it to anyone who takes their body for granted."

But I think the best book I read this summer had to be "Dandelion Wine" by Ray Bradbury. I was just absolutely charmed by that one, I think it'll go beside "Good Omens" and "By the Sword" on my "read it every few years" list.

mccann51
08-07-2011, 12:46 PM
I'm still working on A Dance With Dragons, probably 3/4 of the way through it now, or maybe closer to 2/3.

What are your (non-spoiler) thoughts thus far?

AToE
08-07-2011, 01:02 PM
Well, I'm done the book now, without any spoilers its tough to say much, it's a great book, but it is a lot like the 4th book in that it's largely still set-up for the final books (which I'm guessing are going to stretch into 3 more, not just 2 more honestly).

Without spoilers... the chapters that follow Bran are great, nice to see what he gets up to. Also, if you thought things were bad at the end of the last book, they're worse at the end of this one!

Medsen Fey
08-08-2011, 11:28 AM
It's the Library Book Sale Day!

Yep. Just had one of those here recently, and for $1 I picked up The Failure of the Founding Fathers: Jefferson, Marshall, and the Rise of Presidential Democracy by Bruce Ackerman. It is a richly referenced, and the work of a heavy-weight legal scholar (a slow read), but the information contained is fascinating stuff.

Our founding fathers created a marvelous document, the U.S. Constitution, but it has a few holes, and one of the biggest is the process involved in electing a President. If you thought the "hanging chads" brouhaha in 2000 was fun, the story of the screwed-up election of 1800 makes the 2000 issues look like a tempest in a teacup. It's hard to believe we are still fighting through the same old problems. One thing is for certain - when you hear someone say they long for the days when politics wasn't so partisan and vitriolic, you can be sure they haven't read much of our history because such a time never existed. :)

TheAlchemist
08-12-2011, 09:37 AM
Steppenwolf
Hermann Hesse

I'm finding this more engaging as an audiobook than I did when I picked up the tree-based version.

MrMooCow
08-13-2011, 06:19 PM
How did I miss this thread? I know how to read! Mostly Sci-Fi/Fantasy stuff, because I'm stupid. Actually told that by my western lit teacher in high school. Got sent to the principal's office when I suggested she wasn't smart enough to grasp the symbolism in Dune.

Someone mentioned reading some of Dumas' work. If you like mystery/fantasy stuff, I recommend checking out "The Club Dumas" by Arturo Pérez-Reverte. The book is infinitley better then the movie. The world of high stakes antique book collecting.

Anne McCaffrey - Loved the dragon series, but think it should have ended with "All The Weyr's of Pern". Sky's of Pern was weird. And no good ever comes from letting your kid write books in your world. My Aunt & Uncle are good friends of McCaffrey, and are mentioned in several of her books (they did a lot of the maps for her). My sister once baby sat for her grandkids, and says she is a really, really nice lady.

Fire & Ice - My reaction to the events in Dance with Dragons, "AAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!" I hate Martin. Hate him, hate him, hate him. Can't wait for the next book. ;) Did you know that he has apparently left instructions that all his notes and unfinished manuscripts are to be burned if he dies before the series is finished? Now taking volunteers to sit outside his house with a defibrillator.

Dune - Toast rocking. One of my favorite books. Not as much as AToE, but at least the first three were pretty awesome. I never got through God Emporer. Something about it just kind of loses me. Maybe I'll just kidnap AToE and make him tell me how it all ends. He'd probably do it for free, but kidnapping is so much fun. (Is "He" the appropriate pronoun for a giant sandworm?)

Sword of Truth - Loved many moons ago, but tried rereading it and it wasn't as good. Might be because Goodkind is an arrogant ass, and I'm kind of turned off by him. "I don't read other author's works, because I'm better then them" (actual quote). I have several prints of Keith Parkinson's artwork from the series that really need to get matted and framed.

LotR - I've never managed to read it. I always get bored. Winnie the Poo fantasy, to quote C.S. Lewis. Sauron is supposed to be Mr. Super Evil, but really? He doesn't even make the top 10 when compared to real world evil dictators. Hitler, Stalin, Pol Pot....

Wheel of Time - Gah. Much like LotR, I find Jordan just a bit too verbose. Gave up half way through the 5th book.

Classic Sci-Fi - Clark, Asimov, Heinlein, Sturgeon, etc. Love reading their stuff because I'm a politics/philosophy junky. A lot of their stuff was just thinly disguised philosophy postulations. I'll throw up another couple thumbs for Ender's Game and Starship Troopers.

The Great Gatsby - I despise this book. caffeine211, I challenge you to a duel! :p

Favorites not mentioned so far..... I'm a big fan of Alt History and Contemporary (Near Future) Fantasy.

Dies the Fire - S.M. Stirling's novel of the modern world in which the laws of physics change such that you can no longer build up large stores of energy. In other words, firearms no longer work (high pressure), nor does electricity. Fire burns and water boils, but only enough pressure can be built up for cooking and the most basic steam engine. Needless to say, modern society joins the Dodo.

Dresden Files - Popcorn fiction to be sure, but still a good enjoyable read.

Simon Hawke's Wizard of 4th St series - More popcorn fiction, but fun popcorn fiction. Future world, fossil fuels have run out, world is in chaos, etc. Merlin awakens, and brings magic back. Now everything runs on magic. Life is paradise, then the ancient demons awaken. Each book is about the "Chosen Avatars" chasing down the demons and killing them.

Jennifer Government - Future world in which the only law is corporate/contract law. People take their last name from the corporation they work for. Main character, Jennifer Government, is a government agent. The NRA is now a contract assassin company, and Nike pretty much rules the world. It inspired the "popular" internet time waster "Nationstates.net".

Pulp Classics - Soloman Kane and Tarzan are my favorites. I actually have first edition copies of about the first 20 Tarzan books my grandfather left me. While skiming through them, I found one that was signed and dated by my great grandfather, my grand ather, and my father. I of course added my signature and the date I received them.

Alas, Babylon - Classic post-apocolyptic novel. The author, Pat Frank, was a military reporter at the height of the Cold War. He realized no one, not even a lot of military folks, really understood what would happen if we went at it with the Soviets. The TV series "Jericho" was unofficially based pretty heavily on the book. This book is in constant battle for "my favorite book of all time" with....

The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant - To this day this remains one of my favorite series. Covenant is a text book example of an anti-hero. A best selling author, Covenant has everything until he contracts leprosy. In short order, his wife leaves him, the townspeople shun him, and he grows increasingly bitter and cynical. When he's transported to a magical fantasy world in which his leprosy is cured, and the people think he's a hero, he must confront all of his neurosis that have become his weapons/armor against the outside world.

Donaldson was really creative in his ideas, though his writing isn't always the absolute best. It's good, but sometimes the flow of the story slows a bit much. I'm about to start the last book in the series, which I'm a bit hesitant to do, as the third trilogy hasn't been as good as the first two. Those were published in the late 70's, early 80's, while the third trilogy has been published just in the last decade.

(sorry this become so long.... I really like books)

M63Ural
08-14-2011, 02:04 AM
Re-reading Larry Niven's Juggler of Worlds. It's not Dune, but then what else is.

Jim

AToE
08-14-2011, 02:15 AM
Ha, nice work with that teacher! I once made an English teacher reverse the answer on a test, the original "right" answer was something about SF and Fantasy being only escapist, not possible for them to convey deep meaning. Seriously. I won too, wasn't hard since almost every major SF book in history is drenched with social/political/moral messages.




Fire & Ice - My reaction to the events in Dance with Dragons, "AAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!" I hate Martin. Hate him, hate him, hate him. Can't wait for the next book. ;) Did you know that he has apparently left instructions that all his notes and unfinished manuscripts are to be burned if he dies before the series is finished? Now taking volunteers to sit outside his house with a defibrillator.

Good for him - though personally I would prefer for the notes simply to be released but never have anyone try to finish the novels, like Chris Tolkien did for his father (yeah yeah, he made some books out of them, but he took great care to always release everything he had for notes, hid nothing and honestly tried to do the best for the legacy, unlike the goofs that took over Dune).


Dune - Toast rocking. One of my favorite books. Not as much as AToE, but at least the first three were pretty awesome. I never got through God Emporer. Something about it just kind of loses me. Maybe I'll just kidnap AToE and make him tell me how it all ends. He'd probably do it for free, but kidnapping is so much fun. (Is "He" the appropriate pronoun for a giant sandworm?)

Oh man, GEoD is the best book of the bunch in most hardcore Dune fans' opinions! Leto II is probably one of the most difficult to portay character in any novel ever written, and Herbert pulls it off flawlessly. Personally my fav is probably Dune Messiah, not because it's fun to read, but because that's where the whole point of the first novel is actually made. (Plus it, Children of Dune and GEoD stand up to re-reads better than the first novel, I never could recreate the feeling I had the first time I read that book, like a drug addict chasing that first high!) GEoD is up there for me too though, really killer book - does better after the first read though because it's so cryptic. The last 2 books are good, but a departure, and don't deal with the entirety of humanity any more.

EDIT: and of course I'd be happy to outline what Leto II was up to, how that book ends, and basically how the rest goes. That should be over PM though, so's not to spoil it for everyone. PM me if you actually want that!

And not sure about "he" for a worm, though they are referred to as Grandfathers of the Dessert... people tend to refer to gender neutral dieties as masculine anyways, and the worms were thought to be Shai Hulud in physical form, so maybe "he" would work!

TheAlchemist
08-14-2011, 10:37 AM
Looks like I'll be adding Dies the Fire - S.M. Stirling to my to-do list.

Reading Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amos. It's a HOOT! Calls to mind the British Souls of all the cute guys, Monty Python fans all, I loved in college.

Read The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant some 20 or 30yr ago. Liked them better than Heinlein.

MrMoo, you may enjoy the SciFi Nerd thread...I think it's in The Hive.

MrMooCow
08-14-2011, 02:53 PM
Looks like I'll be adding Dies the Fire - S.M. Stirling to my to-do list.

A fine choice. I thought the first trilogy was excellent "Alt History". Trips my switch for post-apocolyptic, survivalist stuff. I'm fascinated by "collapse of civilization" type stuff. I should probably seek counseling. Or become a dentist. ;D

There's a second trilogy, that focuses on a descendant of both the "good guy" clans. However, Stirling starts to veer into more serious fantasy with the second trilogy, and something about it has always made stop before buying it. The kid's getting vision quest from "The Goddess", there's a magic sword I think.... I don't know.

Chevette Girl
08-14-2011, 04:58 PM
Combining the comments about never getting through LoTR and preferring Steppenwolf as an audio book - it took us three years but how my husband and I got through LoTR was reading it to each other while driving, mostly on long trips which we make two or three times a year. I find the audiobook thing (or having it read to me by my hubby) is good for tough reads (we read "The Prince" by Machiavelli this way too, as well as a couple tough histoical books I'd never have read myself) because even though I myself have trouble processing certain things when read to me* the spoken word is slower than when you read it yourself so your brain takes the time to process it properly instead of passing over anything requiring a pause to think... and "live" audiobooks are easier to rewind... ;D "Hey, can you please start the last paragraph over? I had to concentrate on driving for a sec there and missed what it said..."

* - mostly numbers and mathmatical concepts, just don't bother trying, in one ear and out the other, I need to write them (take notes) or see them written down as a whole, or else not enough of it sticks in my head by the time the narration is finished for me to make sense of it... starting to realize why the engineering degree was so tough :P

MrMooCow
08-14-2011, 05:06 PM
Yeah, I can't do audio books. They're simply to slow for me. I simply have no appreciation for detailed descriptions.

"He was a dark and husky man. Large, round, with skin the color of ebony...." "Right, fat black man, can we move on now?" ;)

However, for those who do like audio books, I recommend audible.com. My sister really likes it. $15 a month membership, which also gets you 1 credit per month. Most books were 1 credit.
- Brett

Sent from my DROID2 GLOBAL using Tapatalk

Chevette Girl
08-14-2011, 05:18 PM
"He was a dark and husky man. Large, round, with skin the color of ebony...." "Right, fat black man, can we move on now?" ;)


LOL, I didn't find Tolkien THAT verbose, but friends of mine joke that Robert Jordan was in fact that bad... oh, and I have to be doing something (driving, chain mail, crocheting, beadwork) while listening or else I fall asleep surprisingly with alarming speed, something I somehow picked up in university...

AToE
08-14-2011, 11:56 PM
Tolkien is excellent, but for today's readers he's tough. Back then there was no TV, language itself was entertainment, you didn't just want a piece of information, you wanted it delivered artfully. It's just a different mind reading the things now than back then, not one right one wrong, just different. If I hadn't read LoTR when I was 8 I might never have gotten into that kind of writing honestly.

Also Tolkien is very dense, people think he over-describes everything, but the reality is that he has less filler than modern writers. If any modern writer wrote LoTR again, just paraphrased it into modern style, it would end up triple the length. He sometimes crammed chapters onto single pages.

Being so dense can make it hard to read though, as it cannot be skip-read effectively. You miss a sentence you miss a LOT, so you have to slow down and get it all, which can make it seem ponderous.


Also - I also cannot handle audio books, it's just so slow. I read far faster than I talk, so an audiobook would be seriously hard for me to follow!

TheAlchemist
08-21-2011, 09:49 AM
Tolkien is excellent...


If you like Tolkien, The Wobbit A Parody is highly recommended:
http://www.amazon.com/Wobbit-Parody-Hobbit-ebook/dp/B004ZR9ELK

It's Funny.

TheAlchemist
08-21-2011, 09:50 AM
Barbara Kingsolver
Animal Vegetable Miracle
Locavore's Heaven.

MattHollingsworth
08-21-2011, 02:12 PM
Also - I also cannot handle audio books, it's just so slow. I read far faster than I talk, so an audiobook would be seriously hard for me to follow!

It's the only way I can go at the moment. We have a nearly 6 month old baby son here, so not getting a lot of reading done these days. But, I work coloring/painting comics all day on the computer, so it's pretty easy to listen to a lot of books. And I've been doing my job for 20 years now, so I go pretty auto pilot most of the time, so I can really pay attention to the book.

Some books are really good as audio books, like A Clockwork Orange. The reader on that is just awesome. I've encountered one book that I think couldn't possibly be as good in written form, called The Adventure of English. It's a pretty decently thorough history of the English language. But, throughout the book, the reader gives examples of all of the dialects, Old English, American slave English, just tons of them. And he's simply amazing.

Anyway, I listen to music, podcasts and audio books. Makes meeting a deadline easier some days. A *good* audio book can make it easier for me to keep my butt in the chair and keep working.

AToE
08-21-2011, 02:22 PM
I might have to try audio book "reading" A Clockwork Orange... that'd be pretty cool I imagine!

MattHollingsworth
08-21-2011, 02:31 PM
I might have to try audio book "reading" A Clockwork Orange... that'd be pretty cool I imagine!

The one I listened to is read by Tom Hollander. It's a good listen.

Chevette Girl
08-21-2011, 02:41 PM
About fifteen years ago, I really enjoyed my boyfriend at the time's copy of the audiobook for Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I don't know who the narrator was but he was great. Unfortunately, also how I discovered that they put me to sleep unless I'm also doing something with my hands. :p

MattHollingsworth
08-21-2011, 03:09 PM
About fifteen years ago, I really enjoyed my boyfriend at the time's copy of the audiobook for Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I don't know who the narrator was but he was great. Unfortunately, also how I discovered that they put me to sleep unless I'm also doing something with my hands. :p

Yeah, don't think I could just sit there and listen to one. It'd knock me out for sure. Besides, if I can just sit there, I'd rather do the reading myself.

Chevette Girl
08-21-2011, 04:12 PM
Yeah, don't think I could just sit there and listen to one. It'd knock me out for sure. Besides, if I can just sit there, I'd rather do the reading myself.

I think it's that we wanted to listen to it together rather than both try to read from the same book (which is generally annoying no matter how much you love someone)... but otherwise, yeah, I'd just read it, and if reading makes me pass out it was either really boring or I need the sleep anyway :)

Sitting on a pile of Ken Follett, contemplating where to start...

MattHollingsworth
08-21-2011, 04:29 PM
Sitting on a pile of Ken Follett, contemplating where to start...

I have The Pillars of the Earth from Follett on my list for audio books, but reviews said the reader isn't so great, so I've hesitated. We'll see. Read anything else by him? Any recommendations?

I just finished the 2 volumes of Battle Cry of Freedom, 38 hours or so of American Civil War history, which was great. About halfway through The Hunger Games, which is pretty fun. Easy but fun. Might do A Short History of Australia next, but not sure. We'll see. Non fiction history stuff is actually easier for me to listen to. If the reader is engaged, it's good. If not, it ends up too dry and sucks the life out of it.

I don't think I'd want to listen to any Cormac McCarthy though. I love reading his use of language and just want to actually read that stuff.

Chevette Girl
08-21-2011, 07:09 PM
I have The Pillars of the Earth from Follett on my list for audio books, but reviews said the reader isn't so great, so I've hesitated. We'll see. Read anything else by him? Any recommendations?

I've read Pillars of the Earth before and I don't know how it'd go as an audio book, it's a really long read and would take for fricking ever being read out loud... that's the only one by him I've read before. Top of the pile is Triple, Code to Zero in there somewhere... but while rooting through the "to read" bag I found one by Jack Whyte, Knights of the Black and White, I think that'll be first :) Ooh, something by Spider Robinson, Telempath, maybe that one first.

Currently reading "Touch Wood, Confessions of an Accidental Porn Director".

wildoates
08-21-2011, 11:59 PM
Audiobooks are too slow for me too, plus, with a book, if I get to a part in the story that I don't like, I can skip over it easily if I only have to turn a few pages. With that said, I do like reading in bed with the kindle app on my iPhone. I've got a bunch of free classics that I've read many times, keeps me off the streets. :)

TheAlchemist
08-22-2011, 09:02 AM
About fifteen years ago, I really enjoyed my boyfriend at the time's copy of the audiobook for Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy...:p

OOhh! I read that on audio, too! Loved it.

What about Dean Koontz?! Loved Life Expectancy...a laugh-out-loud thriller. Also love some of the Odd Thomas books.

TheAlchemist
08-25-2011, 10:01 PM
Finished reading
Hermann Hesse's
Steppenayahuscawolf

It made me ponder this:
Was Hesse a contemporary of Carl Jung?
Indeed he was.
Was he an analysand of Jung?
Don't know.
He was clearly "already opposed to the next war" as Jung was, although he did not see the continent bathed in blood so graphically as Jung did. And he did use the word "individuation" at least once in the text...
Welcome to the Shadowlands...

One treasure of the audiobook:
The text concludes with Mozart. And the audiobook concludes with Mozart in a way that I would not have been able to conjure it in my imagination if I had been reading with my eyes...

ZwolfUpir
08-25-2011, 10:52 PM
I've done the audio book thing too. Most recently was Fahrenheit 451. I'll usually listen to them while working out in the shop as long as I'm not doing a lot of grinding. But I've recently picked up a new book, and if you like blood and people with sharp objects, you might like this one... It's Phlebotomy Essentials. I start my Phlebotomy class on the 13th, so I figured I should get a jump on it rather than getting into another book and not do the class work cause I'm to busy reading. :D

JSquared
08-26-2011, 12:29 AM
Ooh, something by Spider Robinson

I Love Spider Robinson. I have read and reread the Calahan's series for years! He's one of my top ten authors of all times!

At the moment I'm reading "A Song of Fire and Ice" series by George R.R. Martin peppered in with all my magazine reading (Mother Earth News and my culinary mags)

Tokala
08-26-2011, 12:56 AM
I'm reading "The Once and Future King," by T.H. White and re-reading "House of Leaves" by Mark Danilewski. I keep meaning to get back to Songs of Ice and Fire, but never seem to actually do it.

Medsen Fey
08-26-2011, 09:47 AM
I'm just finishing up James Michener's POLAND (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poland_(novel)). I enjoyed reading the book, though the horrors that the Polish people have had to endure over the centuries are painful even to hear about. I was a little disappointed that there was only 1 passing reference to mead.

I'm slowly working my way through his various novels (he was a prolific writer). For anyone that hasn't tried some of Michener's books, all I can say is give one a try. It is the most painless way to study history you'll ever find. Although his sweeping novels are fictions (the specific characters), he sets them in historical context, and the historical facts, wars, leaders and so forth that are presented are quite accurate. He would do extensive and meticulous research in the history, and culture of an area that he would incorporate into his novels making them superior to may non-fiction histories.

For someone wanting to learn some early American history, try Chesapeake.

MrMooCow
08-26-2011, 11:49 AM
I'm just finishing up James Michener's POLAND. I enjoyed reading the book, though the horrors that the Polish people have had to endure over the centuries are painful even to hear about.

Not to hijack the thread, but this reminds me of a conversation we were having in the office regarding global geo-politics. I made the mistake of refering to Winston Churchill as one of Britain's great leaders. This sparked a 20 minute rant from my boss, a Polish immigrant, on how much Churchill was a back stabbing, goat sucking, monkey. Perspective is everything.

Medsen Fey
08-26-2011, 01:56 PM
I made the mistake of refering to Winston Churchill as one of Britain's great leaders. This sparked a 20 minute rant from my boss, a Polish immigrant, ...

Next on your summer reading list? ;D

http://img2.imagesbn.com/images/14310000/14319513.JPG (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/resumes-for-dummies-joyce-lain-kennedy/1100299307)

TheAlchemist
08-26-2011, 03:00 PM
I'm reading "The Once and Future King," by T.H. White...

I loved Once and Future King.
Pairs nicely with The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley.

TheAlchemist
09-06-2011, 09:41 PM
PG Wodehouse
Jeeves: Joy in the Morning

The audiobook is definitely worth the price of admission as I'd never be able to call up the rapier dialog in my imagination that well...

Soyala_Amaya
09-07-2011, 11:03 PM
Just finished completely re-reading Jim Butcher's "The Dresden Files" and am now running through L Frank Baum's original Land of Oz series. I have an e-reader and I love having books lined up in a row

TheAlchemist
10-11-2011, 12:42 AM
Finally!
I have read a book recommended to me by one Paul (Muad'Dib?) some thirty plus years ago. Awesome.

Also read The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan.

Since I do most of my "reading" in the car, I'm a bit tired of the voice of Scott Brick...

MightyJesse
10-11-2011, 12:59 AM
I need to re-read Callahan's Crosstime Saloon by Spider Robinson... It's been like 10 years since I read it, and since the population of my bar loosly resembles some of the characters of the story, I'd like to review and make my bar even MORE like the story... Since there are sort of some other loose connections there that I hope to someday tell stories about...

(So if anyone actually KNOWS the man, please... Tell him that if he will come have a drink at the Knuckle Down Saloon, It'll be on the house - and if he comes at the right time of year, he can hear the man that HE took HIS nom-de-plume from play. Spider John Koerner just played on our stage last Saturday, and I can guarantee that he'll be back as often as he can make the trip...)

What I REALLY need though, is a hearth for that place... That would utterly rock.

AToE
10-11-2011, 01:23 AM
Finally!
I have read a book recommended to me by one Paul (Muad'Dib?) some thirty plus years ago. Awesome.


SHAI HULUD!!!!!!!!!!!! ;D

Now just read the other original 5 books, and stay far away from the ones written by the new authors! ;)

MightyJesse
10-11-2011, 01:26 AM
You have all seen http://goodnightdune.com right? I've read it to my daughter many, many times...

AToE
10-11-2011, 01:34 AM
You have all seen http://goodnightdune.com right? I've read it to my daughter many, many times...

Oh yes, I'm well familiar!

Hey, if you're THAT big of a Dune nut, check out www.jacurutu.com, it's the biggest (English speaking anyways) Dune discussion forum on the net, long history of great people, amazing discussion - just don't introduce yourself with something like "aren't the new books great?" and you'll have a blast. ;)

I'm on there as A Thing of Eternity. (Major bonus points if you know what that means)

MightyJesse
10-11-2011, 09:12 AM
The Fremen language is derivitive of arabic, I believe. Shai hulud in Arabic - not Fremen - means A Thing of Eternity. In Fremen it means Grandfather of the Desert, or somesuch.

TheAlchemist
10-11-2011, 11:54 AM
You have all seen http://goodnightdune.com right? I've read it to my daughter many, many times...

No, I'd never heard of it...love it.

AToE
10-11-2011, 12:03 PM
The Fremen language is derivitive of arabic, I believe. Shai hulud in Arabic - not Fremen - means A Thing of Eternity. In Fremen it means Grandfather of the Desert, or somesuch.

Nicely done! In Fremen though it's never really given a direct translation, the "grandfather of the desert" (among other names, there's at least 5 that I can think of right now, old man of the desert being a similar one) are sort of just parrallel names for the worms, not really translations - because those names all refer directly to the worms, whereas "Shai Hulud" refers to God, the worms just being a physical manifestation of said. So it's safe to assume the a thing of eternity stands as an acceptable translation for Fremen as well.

TheAlchemist
10-18-2011, 12:02 AM
Remember how some guy said the world was going to end in May of this year? Then when it didn't happen he changed his mind and said it would be October instead?

I decided to start my Rapture Bochet on Oct 23 in his honor...hopefully it will be quaffable by the real end-of-the world Winter Solstice 2012...

So just for grins I've taken the LaHaye/Jenkins first in a series Left Behind out of the library...to get myself in the mood...

RightHookCook
10-24-2011, 03:13 AM
Any one ever read this book?

http://compare.ebay.co.uk/like/310353036391?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar

Was thinking about buying it. ;)

AToE
10-24-2011, 03:15 AM
Never even heard of it, sounds interesting enough to me though.

wayneb
10-24-2011, 03:30 PM
Any one ever read this book?

http://compare.ebay.co.uk/like/310353036391?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar

Was thinking about buying it. ;)

That's a relative "oldie" these days, originally published back around the same time as Pamela Spence's "Mad About Mead," although I think it was compiled from info and notes that go back even farther into the past - almost back to when I started making mead for the first time! ;D It is a bit dated, but useful for historical perspective, I think.

RightHookCook
10-26-2011, 10:01 AM
hmmm maybe i wont buy it then, it looks pretty "pro". you guys know of any other good mead making/judging or any thing mead related books? Ive got most of the usual suspects mentioned on the site ;)

TheAlchemist
11-26-2011, 08:18 PM
Just finished reading
The Wobbit: A Parody by Paul A Erickson

Even took the time to post an amazonbook review. That was easier than I thought. Maybe I'll do it again sometime.

Sam2.0
11-27-2011, 01:00 AM
I'm slowly plodding through Comparative Mythology by Puhvel and coasting through the last of the Eragon books while taking side trips of various short stories (mainly sci-fi and fantasy) and poetry.

Chevette Girl
11-27-2011, 02:10 AM
I've been working through the Meredith Gentry series by Laurell K Hamilton... or am I allowed to admit to liking that kind of silliness here? ;D

TheAlchemist
11-27-2011, 12:16 PM
Just finished reading
The Wobbit: A Parody by Paul A Erickson


PS There is a cameo on the part of beekeeping and mead!

robin850
11-27-2011, 11:05 PM
Thomas Covenant, man i loved those books! I re-read them about once every 10-15 years.

Vernor Vinge is another great writer

Vance G
11-28-2011, 01:02 AM
These books cast a lot of light on the fate of the last primary inhabitants of North and South America in teeming millions. The second 1493 deals with the Columbian exchange and the resultant massive changes wrought to the rest of the world by silver gold and plants! The plants being the most disruptive actually. Good reads! I don't buy all of it but most of it makes a lot of sense.

TheAlchemist
12-10-2011, 06:06 PM
Just finished Jean Auel's
Shelters of Stone

Being a Scot, like the esteemed Rev Maclean, I'm tempted to say "Again. Half as long."

I've read her work before as a tree-based book, with my eyes, and never found it as tedious as listening to the audiobook.

Still, there's reasonably well researched info about shamanic journey work and medicinal uses of herbs.

TheAlchemist
12-10-2011, 06:39 PM
...So just for grins I've taken the LaHaye/Jenkins first in a series Left Behind out of the library...to get myself in the mood...

Ugh! The writing! Might have been good for a High School Creative Writing Student...

I certainly won't be listening to any more of their work...but now I understand the xenophobia of evangelical Christendom, their resistance to "charismatic" leaders and to the UN...

TheAlchemist
12-10-2011, 06:41 PM
Darkness Visible by Ross Heaven and Simon Buxton

Essential Paradox:
This is not an audiobook.
Consequently I can not simultaneously both READ and DO this book.
If obligated to make a choice, I would certainly pick the doing of it.
No written word can substitute for the gentleness of the human voice.
Thank you, Simon. Thank you, Naomi. Thank you, Spirit of the Horse.
Thank you, Mother of Darkness.

Chevette Girl
12-11-2011, 02:29 AM
I really oughtta finish reading a Tale of Two Cities, my poor e-book has been sitting in a corner since my summer vacation...

JLindsey
12-12-2011, 12:37 AM
"Cloud Atlas" by David Mitchell. An amazing piece! Five intertwined stories through time, space, and genre. I am ready to pick it up and read it again.
I also enjoy anything by Cormac McCarthy. And Michael Connely for light reading.

veritas
12-18-2011, 06:48 PM
To sleep with the angels.

An account of the "our lady of the angels" school fire in 1958 that claimed the lives of 92 kids between the ages of 9 and 12.

TheAlchemist
01-17-2012, 02:09 PM
The Jungle Book
Rudyard Kipling
Lovely coming-of-age tale.

veritas
01-17-2012, 09:34 PM
Finished to sleep with angels. Despite being a fire fighter I don't usually care for fire books but that one was fantastic very well written. I was so inspired I'm reading 3000 Degrees: The True Story of a Deadly Fire and the Men Who Fought It. Its not as good from the start but time will tell. And there is always the chance I learn something.

Chevette Girl
01-17-2012, 10:22 PM
Currently thoroughly enjoying my brand new copy of The Compleat Meadmaker... finally...

fong song
01-18-2012, 12:03 PM
Revolution: A manifesto, Ron Paul

and

What has Government done to our money, Murray Rothbard

I'd highly recommend reading these books if you are in the faintest way concerned about how the world is going (economic crises, constant war etc)

ken_schramm
01-18-2012, 08:56 PM
Currently thoroughly enjoying my brand new copy of The Compleat Meadmaker... finally...

Thank you.

Soyala_Amaya
01-18-2012, 10:56 PM
Quarelling they met the Dragon

It's...weird. I was not expecting the amount of bondage, boy-boy love, and D/s...not in my sci-fi at least. It's not harlequin-esque, describing thrusts and moistness...but it's more than understood.

(Apparently there's three of these things and you can get them online for less than a buck...)

tycoon
01-19-2012, 09:00 AM
A Sailor of King George: The Journals of Capt.Frederick Hoffman, RN, 1793-1814

Amazing book. If you are a fan of C.S. Forester, Patrick O'Brian, etc, this is a great book. It is available at Project Gutenberg.

TheAlchemist
01-19-2012, 01:15 PM
The Swiss Family Robinson
Johann David Wyss
Great how-to manual, kinda like Hatchet, but a lot more long winded...

TheAlchemist
01-21-2012, 04:04 PM
Oh!
Mead gets a cameo in
The Swiss Family Robinson

PirateNigel
01-25-2012, 07:38 PM
I'm am in envy of all of you reading for pleasure.

I'm currently reading a chemistry textbook, human sexuality TB, Music appreciation TB, and a Communications TB. Soon I'll be delving into American history before the Civil War (Textbook).

M63Ural
01-25-2012, 11:47 PM
I've been enjoying Larry Nivens "Juggler of Worlds" I have both the Uncorrected Advance Copy and a first edition. So I'm a total sci fi geek.

Jim

Sam2.0
01-26-2012, 01:57 PM
I'm am in envy of all of you reading for pleasure.

I'm currently reading a chemistry textbook, human sexuality TB, Music appreciation TB, and a Communications TB. Soon I'll be delving into American history before the Civil War (Textbook).

Good luck in your studies; remember to enjoy them as much as you can.

I miss school.

Back on topic:
Finishe LeGuin's Earthsea series and started Larson's Millennium series.

Penguinetti
01-26-2012, 02:40 PM
I miss school, too.

I can't seem to keep to just one book at a time, so i go back and forth:

The Circle Trilogy (I'm just starting White)
Ted Dekker

It's a fantastic fantasy trilogy about a young guy who delves between two worlds by falling asleep in one and waking up in the other. There is impending doom, love, betrayal, and all the other good stuff that make for a good read.

Poland: A Novel\
James A. Michener

A historical novel (very well written) about the history of Poland by following 3 fictional family lines throughout.

Water Wave Mechanics for Engineers and Scientists
Dean & Dalrymple

:blush: It's a tb from school that I'm re-reading to keep up on what I tried learning. My work doesn't really involve a lot of it :(

God Created the Integers: The Mathematical Breakthroughs That Changed History
edited by Stephen Hawking

It's an anthology of excerpts from a bunch of historical mathmeticians. It's a slow read (especially if you try to follow/understand everything) but definitely interesting. For example, after they found out there were numbers besides whole numbers (i.e. fractions) they tried to keep it a secret because it would ruin their explanation for the cosmos. When one of their people told someone else, he was later taken out to sea and thrown overboard. The first martyr for math! (I'm wierd).

In general, though, I love all that I've read by Michael Crichton, Franz Kafka, and the classics (Bram Stoker's Dracula, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood)

mccann51
01-28-2012, 06:36 PM
I'm am in envy of all of you reading for pleasure.


I'm with ya, it's just been textbooks and lit papers for me (I really should be studying right now, haha).

Been reading Dune for like 5 months now, and I started Ursula LeGuin's The Dispossessed about a month ago. I don't feel like I've even made it past the beginning-book-hump in either yet. That said, I did get to read Dance w Dragons in November n Dec, and that was a nice brain-rest treat.

Chevette Girl
01-29-2012, 06:56 PM
I just finished probably my tenth or twentieth reading of Mercedes Lackey's "By the Sword"... currently halfway through Gordon Ramsay's "Chef's Secrets" and my husband bought me the latest Stephen Hawking book for Xmas but I think I need to work my brain back up to it, it's not had a lot of that kind of exercise for years now :p

mccann51
01-29-2012, 10:08 PM
it's not had a lot of that kind of exercise for years now :p

Haha, I know that feeling!

Penguinetti
01-30-2012, 09:34 AM
... currently halfway through Gordon Ramsay's "Chef's Secrets" ...

How is Chef's Secrets? I really like Gordon Ramsey's style of cooking...

TheAlchemist
01-30-2012, 06:05 PM
Just finished Shamanic Journeying: A Beginner's Guide by Sandra Ingerman. Very like what she teaches in a workshop, but intended for readers who haven't attended a workshop. Pretty basic.

Chevette Girl
01-30-2012, 07:41 PM
How is Chef's Secrets? I really like Gordon Ramsey's style of cooking...

It's really... British. A lot of ingredients I'm not familiar with, and some recipes that I don't think I'll ever have proper equipment for, measurements in grams instead of cups... But still, lots of good ideas and helpful hints and I actually found a recipe last night that I might have all the ingredients for and then got so busy today I forgot to try it... And I can sort of hear his voice in my mind while I'm reading each chapter's forewards. The photos for each section are cute too, they show him cuddling a chicken or with a lobster in his pocket... or tied at the wrists with pasta...:eek:

Penguinetti
01-30-2012, 08:09 PM
Just finished Shamanic Journeying: A Beginner's Guide by Sandra Ingerman. Very like what she teaches in a workshop, but intended for readers who haven't attended a workshop. Pretty basic.

Shamanic... like the characters you can play on World of Warcraft?


It's really... British. A lot of ingredients I'm not familiar with, and some recipes that I don't think I'll ever have proper equipment for, measurements in grams instead of cups... But still, lots of good ideas and helpful hints and I actually found a recipe last night that I might have all the ingredients for and then got so busy today I forgot to try it... And I can sort of hear his voice in my mind while I'm reading each chapter's forewards. The photos for each section are cute too, they show him cuddling a chicken or with a lobster in his pocket... or tied at the wrists with pasta...:eek:

MMM... foodplay. The best kind of forepl-- I mean, he's a cheeky fellow...:rolleyes:

I think I'll have to check that book out the next time I'm at the bookstore. I love finding recipes from around the world. So far I've made Indian, Chinese, Thai, English (my wife prefers to stay away from Sunday roasts, though), Italian, American (why not), Argentine, and Spanish.

Basically, the more 'traditional' a meal is to its native land, the more I want to try it....


On the note of foods... I've got this tapas recipe book which I love pulling things from. Some are very simple, yet very tasty, with most of the ingredients readily available...

Chevette Girl
01-31-2012, 05:17 AM
Shamanic... like the characters you can play on World of Warcraft?



You're gonna get smacked over there if you're not careful... :) Shamanic as in Native American spiritualists. We all know anyone who plays WOW might drink mead but can't really read... and they can be easily identified on forums by their L337 typing skillz.
(now I'm gonna get flamed ;D)

Penguinetti
01-31-2012, 08:18 AM
My wife'll tell you I don't mind getting smacked every now and again...:downtown: :tongue11:

And, I'm not just new to mead, but I've only just started playing WoW, so I don't even have that L337 speak down at all (AHHH NOOB on so many levels!!!).


But, I haven't been to a Powwow since my father took me when I was like 6yo. :sad10:

Lately it's been Irish fests and Scottish games :brave:


...and speaking of 'Scottish'... Harry Potter is on my list of reading material. I've already read the first 2 and a half... I'd like to skip to say, number 4 or 5.

Sam2.0
02-10-2012, 01:15 AM
Finally finished slogging my way through Comparative Mythology. I knew it would be difficult with my limited knowledge of Greek and Roman myths, and complete lack of Indian and Iranian myths.

While I was at it, i also finished Dronke's commentary in her second volume of eddic poems.

Now, I'm thinking of volume 1 of the Feynman lectures, but I haven't really decided on my next "scholarly" book.

TheAlchemist
02-10-2012, 05:29 PM
Oh, I adore comparative mythology!

A Widow for One Year
John Irving

Recipe:
think of a sport...what about squash?
a profession...writers
a conflict...the age old battle between imagination and autobiographical fiction
throw in some addiction, a pinch of grief
keep a little notebook at your bedside so when a simile strikes you, like "as deceptive as a damaged condom," you can write it down and figure out a way to work it into the story...
bake at 350F for 1hr

The horny old goat has written yet another compelling novel...gotta wonder if he has his characters drive a Volvo just because the word sounds so...what?... anatomically womanly?

I'd have loved to hear more about Ruth and Harry, but happiness isn't Irving's specialty.

Soyala_Amaya
02-12-2012, 01:17 PM
I'm rereading the entire Stephanie Plum series because the movie just came out and it reminded me how funny the books are. Yay e-reader and having 20 some odd books at my disposal! (18 books out so far plus holiday inserts)

Chevette Girl
02-12-2012, 05:57 PM
I'm rereading the entire Stephanie Plum series because the movie just came out and it reminded me how funny the books are. Yay e-reader and having 20 some odd books at my disposal! (18 books out so far plus holiday inserts)

<blink> There's a movie?? I have to check on my e-book and see if there are any of them on it. I think I lost track around book 13.

Soyala_Amaya
02-12-2012, 08:08 PM
Yeah, they turned One for the Money into a movie and it had it's US release about a week ago. It's pretty funny, they did most of the charachters pretty well, and followed the book decently too. I had few gripes, mostly about changing things that Morelli did (like he mad Stephanie eggs after they made a deal, instead of her walking in him making scratch spaghetti. In the book, the spaghetti saved his canolli. :) ) Otherwise pretty good and it's set me off.

Penguinetti
02-13-2012, 08:54 AM
I haven't read any of the books, and I wanted to see the movie, but I actually heard a mix of reviews; some that say it wasn't very good at all.. One person walked out after an hour, and another said she wished she did...
Maybe I'll wait till it comes out on Netflix...

Chevette Girl
02-13-2012, 02:09 PM
It IS kind of a silly premise, if you wouldn't like the book I suppose you wouldn't like the movie... had either of the people you'd talked to read the books?

Penguinetti
02-14-2012, 08:58 AM
I actually have no idea... these were not people I knew.

I tend to talk to random strangers when I'm out and about. Old habit from being in another country by mself. I do find that strangers will tell you things they don't normally tell people they know. A tendency due to the fact that you probably won't tell anyone they know.

Chevette Girl
02-14-2012, 12:28 PM
That's an interesting observation, it's like sharing one friend's secret with a totally separate circle of friends because there's no chance it could get back to them :) Random discussions with strangers are always fun, I tend to do that too.

Currently re-reading some favourite webcomics (Girl Genius and A Girl and Her Fed) and just caught up on a new favourite (Questionable Content). Bedside book is Mercedes Lackey's Arrows of the Queen, for maybe the fifteenth time.

chams
02-14-2012, 08:11 PM
I'm always all over the place. I like history, anthropology, philosophy, astronomy, sci-fi...
Right now I'm reading Marcus Aurelius' "Meditations" and Plato's "Republic".
Things I always meant to read but never had the time. I'm an old fart :p

skunkboy
02-14-2012, 11:05 PM
Japanese Manga : Yotsuba

TheAlchemist
02-24-2012, 12:32 PM
Soul Retrieval by Sandra Ingerman
Homer's Odyssey by Gwen Cooper

TheAlchemist
03-05-2012, 12:07 PM
Having read Soul Retrieval (twice, now) and being in Boulder, one of the epicenters of Shamanic healing work, I reckon it's about time I embark on yet another Adventure of the Spirit and go for a Shamanic healing of my own!

TheAlchemist
05-11-2012, 05:57 PM
RIP Maurice Sendak.
Thank you for amplifying the Sense of Wonder.

Chevette Girl
05-11-2012, 08:37 PM
Papazian's Complete Joy of Home Brewing. I'm finding it's a good read, reminds me in a lot of ways how Ken organized the Compleat Meadmaker. :) (yes, I know which one came first and which one likely influenced which ;D)

Soyala_Amaya
05-11-2012, 09:53 PM
Just finished reading The Adept by Katharine Kurtz, it was a very good read.
Review:
"Sir Adam Sinclair, nobleman, physician, and scholar, is the only man who can stand against an unholy cult of black magicians threatening his homeland. When a wizard's sword is stolen from a museum in present-day Scotland, FBI psychiatrist Sir Adam Sinclair is sure that the crime represents something serious. Through a mutual acquaintance, he meets and befriends Peregrine Lovat, a troubled painter who is able to "see" the past and future lives of his subjects. Sir Adam himself is the latest incarnation of the Adept, a spiritual force that battles evil, and he and Peregrine make a perfect team as they set out to discover who stole the sword --and why a 12th-century grave has been unearthed, freeing the revived corpse of Scotland's most noted magician, who then pk wanders into a barpage 127 in the dead of night. The sleuths determine that an evil cult seeks the magician's spell-book and hidden gold. Peregrine draws what he "sees," whether it's the location of the sword or the cult gathered at the graveside. Sir Adam's own mystical powers bring him close to the cult, but closer to mortal and spiritual danger. This is a fast-moving and suspenseful tale by an unusually adroit duo, and the open ending promises more in the future."

The magic wasn't horribly overt, it had a lot of names that made me happy (Loud Macleod tartan), and I really liked Sir Adam as a character. I look forward to buying the rest now.

TheAlchemist
06-04-2012, 12:15 PM
I'm in a Civil War Era frame of mind, what with having seen E L Doctorow's The March at Steppenwolf, the spirit of the Mother's Day Proclamation just behind us and now, I've just finished reading Louisa May Alcott's Little Women.

I really enjoyed her writing...it made me yearn for good old fashioned philanthropy.

fivecats
06-04-2012, 02:50 PM
Murrow: His Life and Times by AM Sperber, an exhaustive biography of one of my personal heroes.

Let's Play Go! by Yasutoshi Yasuda , a kid's book on learning how to play the oriental game of Go. (Years ago, a former college professor of mine told me that whenever he starts to learn about a new subject, he always starts with kids books. They explain the basics in very simple terms, and gave him a good foundation to build off of. I've read other books on Go but I like to stick with the basics when reviewing.)

lauent
06-06-2012, 03:28 AM
Just picked up Norman Mailer's Castle in The Forest and it really is a good read, or at least to the point that I am able to get to, currently.

It is actually about a few untold stories about Hitler and his folks and siblings. Interesting, it talks about a lot of stuff that most people would not have imagined to hold any truth value as considered as such.

Chevette Girl
06-06-2012, 10:12 AM
Ok, it's not a book, but I'm going to see the movie "Barrymore" tomorrow, and I WAS reading a book about Christopher Plummer, the actor portraying Barrymore in the movie... I helped make the armour he's wearing in the last minute and a half of the film. :)

TheAlchemist
06-06-2012, 10:21 AM
Ok, it's not a book, but I'm going to see the movie "Barrymore" tomorrow, and I WAS reading a book about Christopher Plummer, the actor portraying Barrymore in the movie... I helped make the armour he's wearing in the last minute and a half of the film. :)

How cool is that?!
I love doing "double features" in the arts, mixing up theatre and literature and film and such.

TheAlchemist
06-06-2012, 10:55 AM
RIP Ray Bradbury

wayneb
06-06-2012, 12:33 PM
RIP Ray Bradbury

We continue to lose the visionaries of the last century. Who will pick up the mantle for the present day? Much of the modern fiction that I read wallows in the supposed inevitability of societal decay, and the individual's helplessness as they try in vain to fight the downward spiral. I admit, I miss the themes spawned in cold war (and earlier) fiction, that despite the odds, individuals can prevail and even thrive.

TheAlchemist
06-06-2012, 09:55 PM
I hadn't realized that he wrote for Twilight Zone

fivecats
06-06-2012, 10:46 PM
Ok, it's not a book, but I'm going to see the movie "Barrymore" tomorrow, and I WAS reading a book about Christopher Plummer, the actor portraying Barrymore in the movie... I helped make the armour he's wearing in the last minute and a half of the film. :)

That is completely cool!

dingurth
06-06-2012, 11:26 PM
I just finished a Dance with Dragons (fifth book in the series a Song of Ice and Fire by George RR Martin, the books that the show Game of Thrones is based on). I started reading the books before the show came out, but only recently had time to finish the last book. I think they are doing a pretty good job with the show in terms of staying true to the book. Sure there are some changes, but that's to be expected and they are keeping to the heart of the story.

For a while now I've wanted to finally start in on the Dune series, and I just got the first book. So for the foreseeable future, that is what will be occupying my time. :)

Wijnand
06-07-2012, 02:12 PM
I'm reading Tad Williams - Otherland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otherland) at the moment and it's starting to freak me out! :s There is just so much in there that I can see being real within the next twenty years or sooner...

I've read a lot of Tolkien and Terry Pratchett, I am a big fan of the Discworld series. Finally read some Raymond E. Feist, Asimov (I am loving the Foundation series) and H. G. Wells.

TheAlchemist
09-07-2012, 06:58 PM
Reading Jesus Through Pagan Eyes
Ugh!
Some of the interviews are OK.
Otherwise, I just don't need to read about someone else's Vision Quest.
Jesus Speaks Shaman. Duh. I already knew that.

Soyala_Amaya
09-15-2012, 03:01 PM
I'm on book 11 of the Wildcard series. Multiple authors all writing in one world, one timeline, edited by George R R Martin (some written by him) based on his gaming group's DnD adventures.

It has been amazing.

vulcan500rider
09-15-2012, 06:22 PM
Just finished Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon, which is excellent, and am working through The First Law series by Joe Abercrombie. Also very good, thus far.

Kelvin
09-16-2012, 03:16 AM
I've been reading:

Federal Income Taxation
Disput Resolution and Lawyers
Federal Administrative Law

I can tell you they are SUPER fun reading >:/

Eh whatever, I'll get to read for fun again in a year maybe....

However, bathroom reading is my old standby:
The Mother Tongue, by Bill Bryson.. you can't go wrong with that gem.

TheAlchemist
09-16-2012, 02:10 PM
Kelvin, sounds like you'd be a barrel of laughs at a party. But seriously, I do love me some Bryson.

illuveatar
10-05-2012, 12:35 PM
I'm re-reading The Republic by Plato. I read the same translation about 10 years ago but I thought I'd read it again to see if my point of view has changed. So far I still find myself arguing with Socrates on certain points but It's still a great dialogue and I agree with most of the framework he puts forth.

TheAlchemist
10-05-2012, 01:42 PM
As CS Lewis would say:

It's all in Plato
Bless me what DO they teach them in these schools?

Vance G
10-05-2012, 11:55 PM
I am reading a great old book. The passing of the Armies by Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. My copy was from a 1993 bantam edition. It was originally published in the authors extreme old age in 1915. If you read Angels and Demons or the Killer Angels, you are familiar with General/Professor Chamberlain. This book recounts the last campaign of the civil war up to the surrender of Lee at Appomatox and the march of the Army of the Potomac to Washington for it's mustering out. The history of the bloody days are recounted in brief and the book is most recommended to people fairly knowledgeable in the tradgedy that was the American Civil War. Good Lord talk about millions with PTSD! These vets had a reason to have some! I wonder how many did? All? I know my father did from his time with Patton from the Ardennes to Bavaria where he ended up. I digress wonderful book and it makes one grieve over the devolution of education and the mother tongue.

skunkboy
10-05-2012, 11:57 PM
I am reading a great old book. The passing of the Armies by Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. My copy was from a 1993 bantam edition. It was originally published in the authors extreme old age in 1915. If you read Angels and Demons or the Killer Angels, you are familiar with General/Professor Chamberlain. This book recounts the last campaign of the civil war up to the surrender of Lee at Appomatox and the march of the Army of the Potomac to Washington for it's mustering out. The history of the bloody days are recounted in brief and the book is most recommended to people fairly knowledgeable in the tradgedy that was the American Civil War. Good Lord talk about millions with PTSD! These vets had a reason to have some! I wonder how many did? All? I know my father did from his time with Patton from the Ardennes to Bavaria where he ended up. I digress wonderful book and it makes one grieve over the devolution of education and the mother tongue.

Cool, I never realized that Chamberlain had written about his time during the Civil War, now I have to go find a copy ... :)

Vance G
10-05-2012, 11:58 PM
Amazons used books will show you the way. You won't be sorry.

TheAlchemist
10-06-2012, 08:14 AM
ABE books on line is another choice.

skunkboy
10-06-2012, 02:51 PM
ABE books on line is another choice.

I looked and the library I work has copies of of two of his books, so I will read those and see what I think of them before pursing any others through other means. Not that I am adverse to buying more books, although the floor joists might creak... :)

Guinlilly
10-06-2012, 10:37 PM
Currently reading No Ordinary Joes (http://www.amazon.com/No-Ordinary-Joes-Extraordinary-Submariners/dp/0609610430/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1349577358&sr=8-1&keywords=no+ordinary+joes). It's about four submariners that went down in WWII and were Japanese prisoners of war, Larry Colton started writing it because of a short story written by one of the gentleman about the love he had for his wife. The wife happens to live at the retirement community I work at. I will never look at her the same way again. :o

wildoates
10-06-2012, 11:27 PM
I've been reading:

Federal Income Taxation
Disput Resolution and Lawyers
Federal Administrative Law

I can tell you they are SUPER fun reading >:/

Eh whatever, I'll get to read for fun again in a year maybe....

However, bathroom reading is my old standby:
The Mother Tongue, by Bill Bryson.. you can't go wrong with that gem.

No you can't, it's one of my favorite books. All his stuff is worth reading.

TheAlchemist
10-07-2012, 08:10 AM
Currently reading No Ordinary Joes (http://www.amazon.com/No-Ordinary-Joes-Extraordinary-Submariners/dp/0609610430/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1349577358&sr=8-1&keywords=no+ordinary+joes). It's about four submariners that went down in WWII and were Japanese prisoners of war, Larry Colton started writing it because of a short story written by one of the gentleman about the love he had for his wife. The wife happens to live at the retirement community I work at. I will never look at her the same way again. :o

Wow. Great story.

celticgladiator
10-07-2012, 02:33 PM
I'm on book 3 of The Saxon Chronicles by Bernard Cornwell, excellent reading if you like historical fiction about Vikings and warfare.

mrperq
10-08-2012, 03:42 AM
Not much reading right now, if not counting the Wikipedia and consorts.
Too much work on the house, and leaves little budget for books. (I like
to buy them for keeps) The last ones where Design Patterns: Elements of
Reusable Object-Oriented Software, and Islam: Critical Esseys on a Political
Religion. Last fiction was so long ago I can't even remember. Probably
a book from Agatha Christi.


I know my father did from his time with Patton from the Ardennes to Bavaria where he ended up.

Hat of to your dad, sir. We all have a debt to these men we will never
be able to repay. If you ever visit Belgium do visit the Bastogne War
Museum. It left quit the impression on me. (Its closed for renovation
till 2013 I think.)

TheAlchemist
02-01-2013, 04:14 PM
What's the update on this?
Any Gotmeaders reading these days?

Marshmallow Blue
02-01-2013, 04:44 PM
Game of Thrones Book 5. Before Game of thrones I read Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter... It was very very good, unlike the movie... which wasnt.

Chevette Girl
02-01-2013, 04:45 PM
Just finished Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and The Sword in the Stone by TH White, just starting Jane Austen's Emma.

smertz001
02-01-2013, 08:54 PM
Let's see currently being read, GotMead Forums! (Lots of catching up to do, since I got started so late!)
"First Steps in Winemaking" by C. J. J. Berry - Given to me by my mother who received it from my dad's father in the late 1960s.
"Homebrewing Guide" bye Dave Miller
"ACSM's Resources for the Personal Trainer" (Studying to become a personal trainer)
"Fitness Swimming" by Emmett Hines (Studying to become a triathlon coach)
"Let us Prey" by Jamie Lee Scott - Because mysteries are mysterious.

graydragon2
02-07-2013, 09:27 AM
Just finished rereading S.M. Stirling's Dies The Fire series. Just started reading the second book in the I am Number Four series. Also reread City of Bones since they are releasing a movie of it. May go back and read Beautiful Creatures since they are releasing a movie of it too. When I am not reading I am catching up on podcast like the Wigglian Way and waiting on Pagan Centered Podcast to start back releasing episodes.

TheAlchemist
02-08-2013, 05:43 AM
Final Gifts
Maggie Callanan & Patricia Kelley

(occupational hazard)

TheAlchemist
02-10-2013, 02:13 PM
Wow
This. Book. Is. Awesome.

psychopomp23
02-11-2013, 11:11 AM
I'm currently reading 'Good omens' by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. Only 40 pages to go and i'm loving it, great read

xopher425
02-11-2013, 01:48 PM
Good Omens is one of my all time favorite books - I so adore Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. I've had the good luck to meet both of them, and, by chance, had several of each's book with me. My Good Omens is signed by both, and they do it in the expected grand manner:

The first person to sign it uses an opening line from 10 jokes. The second author signs it with the punchline. Mine says:

Gaiman: "Burn this book!"
Pratchett: "Apply sacred match HERE."

I LOVE IT!

psychopomp23
02-11-2013, 02:12 PM
Haha! Awesome! Maybe someday i'll get a chance to get some of their books signed and give Neil a bottle of mead that i've madecalled 'Sandman' or 'Sleer' or something else that i would've named from one of his books.

xopher425
02-11-2013, 02:25 PM
I've wondered about recreating his funeral wine from Anansi Boys.

"Its seasoned with bitter aloes and rosemary, and with the tears of brokenhearted virgins."

Wow, that man . . .

psychopomp23
02-11-2013, 02:56 PM
I haven't read Anansi boys but i know the character since i read American God but i'll pick it up next :) And i'm sure you could find some brokenhearted virgin teardrops on ebay...i wonder how much you'd have to use... haha

Chevette Girl
02-12-2013, 12:57 AM
Good Omens is one of my all time favorite books - I so adore Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. I've had the good luck to meet both of them, and, by chance, had several of each's book with me. My Good Omens is signed by both, and they do it in the expected grand manner:

The first person to sign it uses an opening line from 10 jokes. The second author signs it with the punchline. Mine says:

Gaiman: "Burn this book!"
Pratchett: "Apply sacred match HERE."

I LOVE IT!

That's so awesome... it's one of those books I read every couple of years... my cassette player in the Chevette no longer works so I don't have to worry about increasing the stockpile of Best of Queen tapes anymore... (although with the Beast it was always an Iron Maiden tape)