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ZwolfUpir
07-22-2011, 09:30 PM
Ello,

I recently, about 4 hours ago, bottled my very first batch of mead. I used the ancient spiced orange recipe on here and golly gosh it's good. Wishing I could fast forward the aging a bit, but I have a questions.

Is there anything I can do with that slugdyness in the bottom of the bottle? I believe I read about it being used in soup somewhere, but I didn't save the page it seems. I've also seen that beer sludge is good for compost.

Anyone know anything about either of these ideas or perhaps some other idea of what to do with it. I dislike wasting things...

Thanx,

triarchy
07-23-2011, 12:57 AM
I compost mine. I have never thought to try to add it to anything I would eat. My initial reaction is it would degrade the flavor of the food. But Ive been wrong before. Its an interesting thought.

AToE
07-23-2011, 01:33 AM
Some people use it in bread (either replacing the yeast in the recipe or in addition to it), that seems like one of the better food purposes of it to me. I just pour it under a tree to feed the tree.

kudapucat
07-23-2011, 04:33 AM
Some people use it in bread (either replacing the yeast in the recipe or in addition to it), that seems like one of the better food purposes of it to me. I just pour it under a tree to feed the tree.

You can only replace the yeast in bread if your fermented it dry, and the yeast still lives. JAO lees wont make any bread rise, no matter how you knead it.

AToE
07-23-2011, 01:35 PM
You can only replace the yeast in bread if your fermented it dry, and the yeast still lives. JAO lees wont make any bread rise, no matter how you knead it.

That makes sense, the yeast still living is pretty much a given, but not necessarily in large quantities, especially if they've hit their alcohol tolerance. (If you pitched new mead onto pretty much any lees it's likely to ferment, but I guess in bread you're not exactly looking at the same time frame as you can wait for the yeast to rebuild)

JayH
07-23-2011, 04:36 PM
I compost mine. I have never thought to try to add it to anything I would eat. My initial reaction is it would degrade the flavor of the food. But Ive been wrong before. Its an interesting thought.

How are your squirrels? Mine have become alcoholics all waiting for the next batch of orange rinds from a bottle of JAO to be dumped on the heap.


Jay

triarchy
07-24-2011, 10:22 PM
How are your squirrels? Mine have become alcoholics all waiting for the next batch of orange rinds from a bottle of JAO to be dumped on the heap.


Jay

I dont have many squirrels, but I have deer. And a nice garden when I can keep the deer out. Im not on speaking terms with my deer currently as they are testing my clever garden defense system. They make regular stops to the mulch pile as well. They will eat the most vile, revolting stuff including my brew sludge. I hope they feel bad the next day ;D

kudapucat
07-24-2011, 11:14 PM
Are drunk deer easier to shoot?

Loadnabox
07-25-2011, 08:45 AM
I dont have many squirrels, but I have deer. And a nice garden when I can keep the deer out. Im not on speaking terms with my deer currently as they are testing my clever garden defense system. They make regular stops to the mulch pile as well. They will eat the most vile, revolting stuff including my brew sludge. I hope they feel bad the next day ;D

I'll take care of the deer for you

mmmmm.... deer steak

psuath
07-25-2011, 10:40 AM
it's the lees sorta the basic component of Vegamite?

ZwolfUpir
07-25-2011, 01:41 PM
Well, I decided to just go with it. I had found a few recipes on making sake lees soup and kinda worked around that concept. So far so good {read: Haven't gone blind yet.} and it tastes pretty good too. A little sweeter than I would normally like a soup, but...

Anyways, here is how I did it if anyone wants to give it a shot...

For the lees, I siphoned out the JAO to get three liters from a gallon jug with about half a pint mason jar. So there was still a bit of mead left in the jar as I was trying not to get any of the floaty or sinky stuff. Yes, both technical terms. So then I squeezed the oranges into the lees letting the pulp bits fall off tossing the rind and pith into the compost bin. I then strained it through cheese cloth and squeezed the heck out of it to get as much fluid as I felt like getting out of the mushy stuff. Another technical term. Then I had set that aside while I looked for a recipe. When I came back it had separated, so after sipping some of the mead off the top I mixed it back together. ;)

2 cans of veggi broth
1 can of water
1 can corn with water
1 cup of the previously described lees
1 1/2 cups carrots cut into disks
4 garlic cloves
1/2 medium onion
1 cup dry cooked rice
1 cup chopped up green bean/pea pods from the garden
Salt and pepper to taste

I started with making the dry rice. I like doing it this way cause it can still soak up flavor from the broth, but doesn't take away all the broth you have. I measure out about 1 3/4 cup of water, maybe a bit more I'm not overly exact, and bring to boil with some salt in the water. Then add 1 cup of dry rice and turn heat down to 1 or 2 on the stove and leave it covered for 25-30 minutes {Till all the water is gone}.

While the rice is going I put the 2 cans of broth, can of water, and corn water into a medium pot along with the garlic crush and cut up a bit and the onions chopped up to about the size of the corn kernels. Bring to boil and let simmer for about 15 to 20 minutes. I kept skimming the foam off cause it looked funky, but that's just me.

I then added the carrots and corn to the mix and let it simmer till the carrots were almost to the texture I wanted. I like them still snappy but not quite crunch. This took about 12 minutes for me.

I then added the green bits and the lees to the mix and let go for 5 min or so while I answered the phone. Wife called so I couldn't just not answer. Then I added the rice and salt and pepper, covered, and turned down to medium heat and let sit for 10 min or so.


So yeah, like I said, it's pretty good and I'm on my second small bowl and still not blind, throwing up, or delusional... at least I don't think I'm delusional... Your all midget violet furry elephants... right???

ZwolfUpir
07-25-2011, 07:06 PM
So... the rice finished sucking up all the broth and is now more of a... blob {technical terms again} so... yeah... We'll see what happens when I heat it up tomorrow for lunch. :D

mccann51
07-25-2011, 07:33 PM
Does the used yeast impart any discernible flavor to the soup?

Chevette Girl
07-25-2011, 08:20 PM
This would be really interesting to try with lees from something that fermented dry!

ZwolfUpir
07-25-2011, 09:03 PM
I can't say I noticed any yeasty taste to it. But since I kinda just made the soup on the fly, I couldn't really tell if the lees added any real flavor beyond the sweetness.

I will let ya all know how it taste tomorrow since soup is better the next day. But if you try it, definitely use less rice. I have no broth left... >:(

kudapucat
07-26-2011, 03:30 AM
it's the lees sorta the basic component of Vegamite?

Yeah, beer lees. We love the stuff. Product of the depression, anything was edible until proven otherwise.

Chevette Girl
07-26-2011, 10:27 AM
Yeah, beer lees. We love the stuff. Product of the depression, anything was edible until proven otherwise.

I've concluded that Marmite is inedible :P
But then I like some pretty odd combinations so there's no accounting for tastes.

Spent fruit in bread is pretty tasty but so far I haven't managed to get the yeast to kick back up themselves more, always had to add a little bread yeast.

AToE
07-26-2011, 12:49 PM
I love marmite/vegimite, just not smeared on toast! I use it like I would use beef stock, for broths, gravies, etc.

ZwolfUpir
07-26-2011, 02:57 PM
Still good the next day, I think the flavors mellowed and blended a bit better over night and with reheating. No yeasty taste I could find nor that my sons mentioned. Out of the four people in the house only my wife didn't like it, going so far as to spit it out and saying it was gross and mucky {Learning all these new technical terms} after trying it cold and not wanting to heat it up, so 3 out of 4 ain't bad.

Next time I will use about 1/3 the rice though. Still annoyed at the lack of broth...

kudapucat
07-26-2011, 06:59 PM
I love marmite/vegimite, just not smeared on toast! I use it like I would use beef stock, for broths, gravies, etc.

It's also a great mouth ulcer ointment, though not one for the faint hearted. :eek:
try it just on cheese, or with cheese in a toasted sandwich.
if just with cheeze, make sure it's a good cheddar, no Kraft crap.

TheAlchemist
07-26-2011, 07:54 PM
I use my spent lees in quick breads. I nuke them in a slurry for food for other still-cooking batches of mead. I compost them. I read on here somewhere that they're nutritionally equivalent to Brewer's Yeast. The Irish feed the spent grain/lees from Guiness and Jameson to the cows...you wondered why Irish butter and cheese are so delicious...happy cows.

ZwolfUpir
07-26-2011, 10:16 PM
My wife make lots of banana and zucchini quick breads. How much lees do you put in and what are you taking out to offset the new liquid?

Chevette Girl
07-26-2011, 11:21 PM
Maybe TheAlchemist uses a proper recipe, but I just wing it with yeast breads, start with a cup or two of liquid, add some yeast, a tablespoon of sugar and then just add flour till it's the right consistency, knead... but if I were going to use it in something using baking soda/baking powder as leavening instead of yeast, I'd probably remove an equivalent amount of whatever the liquid content was supposed to have been, replacing most of the oil and some of the water in my chocolate cake recipe with applesauce or zucchini purée works quite well...

ZwolfUpir
07-27-2011, 08:22 AM
We use apple sauce as replacement in a lot of recipes. I'm trying to find a way that my wife will eat something with lees in it cause she is B deficient and hates taking the sub-lingual pill. So I'm hoping to find something she will like and have it help that deficiency. ...And if I have to make more mead to help her, I can make that sacrifice. :D

TheAlchemist
07-27-2011, 09:30 AM
...And if I have to make more mead to help her, I can make that sacrifice. :D

What a great guy!

I pretty much just fly by the seat of my pants with adding lees to quick breads. Plus I substitute honey for sugar in many recipes. Maybe I use a bit less oil...I don't honestly know what I do...

ZwolfUpir
07-27-2011, 08:23 PM
Wow, that is just soooooooo helpful. ;D The only way I could maybe possibly get her to try something like this is if I had a recipe. After the soup, she has like so little interest in trying anything with lees, so I think I will have to make something and have her try it and hope she doesn't ask to many questions. :D And since I pretty much such at baking with out clear instructions...

kudapucat
07-27-2011, 08:37 PM
Wow, that is just soooooooo helpful. ;D The only way I could maybe possibly get her to try something like this is if I had a recipe. After the soup, she has like so little interest in trying anything with lees, so I think I will have to make something and have her try it and hope she doesn't ask to many questions. :D And since I pretty much such at baking with out clear instructions...

Here's the best way to 'fly by the seat of your pants' which is necessary with things of unknown density/water content such as lees.

Make something as per recipe, ie bread, cake etc.

Then make the same thing with lees.
Mix all the dry ingredients. (maybe only add sugar to taste, as the lees may be sweet depending on what they're from)
Add the lees, then top up with the liquid ingredients, until the dough comes to rougly the same consistancy as when you made it by the recipe.
It will work, it will probably taste quite good, from my experience.


If you have a nread machine, it's easy.
Do just as above, then add water until the dough appears right. if it goes too far and is wet, add flour. Bread's simple ;-)

Medsen Fey
07-28-2011, 11:12 AM
I mostly dump the lees on the ground around my fruit trees. I figure maybe I'll get some good feral yeast in the yard.

I have used lees to make smoothies. Just like adding brewer's yeast, you can add old lees. If you use a quarter cup of lees, add a banana, a cup a fruit juice, some ice, +/- a little yogurt (or milk), and maybe a touch of honey or sugar for sweetening, and run it all through the blender, you get a fruit smoothie with plenty of protein and vitamins. Obviously, I won't do this with stinky lees.

TheAlchemist
07-28-2011, 11:19 AM
I haven't tried a smoothie yet...maybe that's what I'll do with the Learning to Bow lees from this morning.

Matrix4b
08-04-2011, 01:42 PM
The Lees might work in bread. I have attempted to make a Almond butter from spent Almonds, grinded up and added sugar. Not good. You can deffinitely tell that the flavor is all gone out of the almonds.

Now I have seen online raspberry seeds are used as a diatary suplament. I saved the seeds from my raspberry batch, about 1 1/2 cups of seeds. I was thinking on grinding it up and putting it in bread. Sort of a fortified Bread.

The lees, I haven't used but I noticed that if I place in another container when racking, like a jar, it will settle out some more and I can tell if it is still fermenting. I release the pressure every day or so. A good way to test if you have active yeast.

I often try to use the leavings of my mead. I currently have frozen, some lemon juice, Lime Juice, Lime Zest (made extract of 10 pounds worth of lemon zest I had), I also have about 2 cups of blueberry pulp.

TheAlchemist
08-04-2011, 05:50 PM
I'll be making a quickbread with my spent RattleSnake Farm berries.

triarchy
08-04-2011, 07:20 PM
Now I have seen online raspberry seeds are used as a diatary suplament. I saved the seeds from my raspberry batch, about 1 1/2 cups of seeds.

I tried to plant my spent raspberry and blackberry seeds. I thought it was a long shot because they had been fermented, but I wasnt sure. It didnt work. Anybody know for sure this is futile because I am dumb enough to try it again...probably.