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View Full Version : Containers for drinking mead......



fatbloke
07-30-2011, 03:28 PM
Not that long ago, I seem to recall a thread about cups and other containers that might be used for the drinking of mead(s)...

I remember discussion about glasses, cups, horn, leather tankards, etc etc

Now I'm aware of some of the re-enactment type groups/societies etc (hell there's a few of those here as well), but it's not my thing.

So for those who like the more historic nonsense, has anyone tried this idea for a drinking vessel (http://www.instructables.com/id/wooden-beer-mug/) ?

regards

fatbloke

p.s. Oh and ignore the warning on the first page if you make it from barrel quality oak......

Guinlilly
07-30-2011, 04:59 PM
I've drunk from wooden tankards, goblets, etc before. They've all been sanded down smooth, stained, and sealed though and I've never tried my hand at making one. :)

1k_wayne
07-30-2011, 06:58 PM
Rather than straight edges that can be a bugger to get accurate, I'd use the router with cove and roundover bits on either side of the strips of wood. In fact, I might just try it. Thanks.

fatbloke
07-31-2011, 04:07 AM
Rather than straight edges that can be a bugger to get accurate, I'd use the router with cove and roundover bits on either side of the strips of wood. In fact, I might just try it. Thanks.
Well I was thinking along the lines, that with appropriate fittings and a bit more study, it should be possible to have nice rounded edges and a properly coopered base as well.

It probably wouldn't need to be as thick sided either.....

Either way, I figured it was an interesting place to start with........

regards

fatbloke

dover157
07-31-2011, 07:49 AM
As soon as I get me grubby hands on a table saw to make the slats I plan on producing a few tankards of a similar style on my lathe. That way the inside and ouside is smooth and the desigin possibilites are endless. One I was going to make would have a peice of Elk antler for a handle held in place with a leather strap and some brass tacks. Not sure what finish though, epoxy is the best for a vessel that will have alcohol in it, but is a pita to work with and you need a really low speed lathe.

fatbloke
07-31-2011, 09:23 AM
As soon as I get me grubby hands on a table saw to make the slats I plan on producing a few tankards of a similar style on my lathe. That way the inside and ouside is smooth and the desigin possibilites are endless. One I was going to make would have a peice of Elk antler for a handle held in place with a leather strap and some brass tacks. Not sure what finish though, epoxy is the best for a vessel that will have alcohol in it, but is a pita to work with and you need a really low speed lathe.
Well if we could think up a "doable" way of making metal straps, then you could probably scorch the inner part lightly, or something like that.

The idea of leather straps might work though. Something like getting the leather, soaking it, staple then pin it with nice decorative pins/nails, then leaving it somewhere warm to dry/shrink/tension.......

The lathe suggestion is also good, as it does seem that there's many ways of producing something quite special.....

regards

fatbloke

kudapucat
07-31-2011, 10:43 AM
Standard metal boxing straps could be used. Tighten up with machine, then instead of using the ugly crimp connector, simply drive two screws through and into the timber.
When I have my workroom sorted, i may just attempt this too.

dover157
07-31-2011, 08:34 PM
The lathe suggestion is also good

fatbloke

Woodturning is my first hobby, so the lathe is my go to tool, I plan on using this idea http://bobhamswwing.com/Articles/Staved%20box/Staved%20box%20page1.htm but making a cup instead of a box, this one was to protect a display goblet, is a good read if you like woodworking.

Chevette Girl
08-07-2011, 10:15 PM
Well if we could think up a "doable" way of making metal straps


I rather like the hose clamps the guy used to glue his staves together... maybe a bit steampunkish but if I get my hands on a saw that'll cut staves correctly, it sorta fits with the whole Chevette theme for me ;D

Edit: my hubby just suggested making the handle wide enough to hide the hose clamp bits... if you flared them at the ends where they go on to the mug... hmmmmm...

beeboy
08-09-2011, 10:03 PM
Try sealing the inside of the tankard with 2 coats of hot bees wax, it will soak into the wood and give a mead proof finish. Just remember not to use hot water to rinse the tankard out with at the end of the day.

kudapucat
08-09-2011, 11:21 PM
Try sealing the inside of the tankard with 2 coats of hot bees wax, it will soak into the wood and give a mead proof finish. Just remember not to use hot water to rinse the tankard out with at the end of the day.

hot water will soften beeswax, but I've found the worst thing you can do when trying to remove the stuff is to add it to water that is not boiling, as it goes solidish and sticks hard.
So I would think that a prolonged soak in Very hot water would be bad, a quick dunk and rinse, with a wipeout wouldn't hurt all that much.

Guinlilly
08-10-2011, 09:06 AM
hot water will soften beeswax, but I've found the worst thing you can do when trying to remove the stuff is to add it to water that is not boiling, as it goes solidish and sticks hard.
So I would think that a prolonged soak in Very hot water would be bad, a quick dunk and rinse, with a wipeout wouldn't hurt all that much.

This. My drinking horn is coated with beeswax and I just rinse it well and give it a quick wipe. No bad smells, nothing growing, etc.

kudapucat
08-11-2011, 10:16 AM
Try sealing the inside of the tankard with 2 coats of hot bees wax
what do you mean 2 coats? I find the wood takes what it can, a second application does little.
But the I usually friction seal all my woodwork, giving the timber as much raw wax as I can.
You don't mean a wax and linseed polish or anything do you? Linseed softens beeswax, but I reckon it's worth the muscular effort to use pure beeswax.

Chevette Girl
08-11-2011, 08:50 PM
When I treat my wooden knife handles with beeswax I soak them in wax in the oven for an hour or two to make sure the wood absorbs everything it can.

I did three coats on my drinking horn just to make sure it actually coated everything. I also wanted the very bottom to fill up with wax because it's too deep to see down and I don't want to get to the bottom of a hornful of mead or anything else and only then find out that there was a spider living down there or something icky had fallen in between uses.

I think if I were coating a tankard, I'd do two coats as well, one to soak into the wood and one to act as a barrier on the surface, I find with my knife handles that even though I don't go anywhere near the handles with hot water, they do eventually start absorbing water because eventually the wood gets exposed and wicks the water under the wax.

If I really wanted to waterproof them, I'd soak them, then let them cool, then dip them again.

TheAlchemist
08-11-2011, 09:59 PM
God Bless Beeswax!
(or, whatever you say when you don't say "God Bless Bee's Wax..." perhaps "Blessed be Beeswax!")