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arnaud
08-26-2011, 10:10 AM
Hi everyone, still trying to figure out what goes wrong with all my batches..
Formerly i used to pur dry yeast in the must, when it got room temperature.
Many here advised me to make a starter.. this involves more steps which might contaminate the must but okay..
When pouring in the hydratet yeast, some of it sticks on the inside of the glass fermenter, and stays there.. is this another possible source for failing of the mead??

Medsen Fey
08-26-2011, 10:37 AM
When pouring in the hydratet yeast, some of it sticks on the inside of the glass fermenter, and stays there.. is this another possible source for failing of the mead??

Short answer - no.

Can you give us the details of your current plan - ingredients, gravity, yeast strain, how you rehydrated the yeast, etc.?

AToE
08-26-2011, 12:36 PM
Definitely not the cause of the problem, a few lost cells won't hurt you, especially if you made a starter (did you actually make a starter, or just rehydrate the yeast? Either way more yeast will be alive than if you just dumped in the dry yeast, so losing some doesn't matter).

M63Ural
08-27-2011, 01:05 AM
Tell us what kind of yeast you are using as well. Some need less attention than others, and some will agressivly fight for their territory. Musts with lots of honey can stress some yeast as well. old yeast can be a factor also.

I like k1v-1116 and it makes a great mead, but to trouble shoot we will need more information.

Jim

arnaud
09-04-2011, 06:15 AM
Most of the time i use champagne yeast(had lot's of successes with this), last time i tried a sort that was recommended here but it went sour..
Firt, i will cry myself to sleep, and maybe try what ive done when things did turn uot okay again(and later not) and will refrain from the steps of making a starter or hydrating the yeast, which are only more chances of contamination..

Medsen Fey
09-04-2011, 10:31 AM
Making starters and rehydrating yeast do not increase the risk of contamination. If anything, they decrease the risk because they increase the population of competitive healthy yeast. Again, without details it is hard to speculate.

Frankly, it is difficult to contaminate a mead with something that will out-compete Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. It isn't like beer brewing where contamination is more of a problem. Most spoilage issues with a mead occur later after fermentation is over, with acetic acid bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, brettanomyces, other other organism that crop up while aging if there is too much oxygen exposure and/or too little sulfite (SO2).

On the other hand it is quite common for meads to smell and taste sour during and after fermentation, as the yeast do produce a number of organic acids. Meads may have other odd aromas/flavors during fermentation that will fade during aging over a period of 1-2 years. The next time you think one has gone sour, consider aging it longer.