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josh
10-23-2011, 10:43 PM
This is my first shot at brewing cyser, and I have a question about it.

Recipe: 3 gallons apple cider
3-3.5 lbs honey
1/2 packet champagne yeast

I added the yeast to the fresh cider, left it for a week, and then racked it into a secondary fermenter. I didn't add the honey until it came out of the primary fermenter, and it seemed to be doing fine until then. It's still fermenting slowly, but a thick (1") semi clear layer has settled at the bottom, under the yeast lees.
This may be a foolish question, but does it need to be stirred, or have a a yeast nutrient added, or is this supposed to happen?

Thanks

Josh

triarchy
10-24-2011, 07:33 AM
Hi josh, welcome to GotMead. While I may not have not seen what you are describing, I wouldnt be too worried. Id say to go ahead and give it a gentle swirl or stir. That will help re-suspend the yeast at least. You dont want to splash it around too much after the 1/3 sugar break (and Im assuming you are passed that).

One helpful tool for you would be a hydrometer. This would tell you where you are in your fermentation. Depending on how far the fermentation has gone will determine if you should add any nutrients and what kind would help.

Good luck with the cyser!

Chevette Girl
10-24-2011, 12:12 PM
I'm wondering if maybe your honey didn't mix all the way and has settled out, and that's the clear layer you're seeing at the bottom under the lees?

+1 on stirring, it might help and certainly won't hurt anything.

josh
10-25-2011, 09:05 AM
I'll give the stirring a go, thanks for the tip.

It is fermenting slowly right now (2-3 bubbles a minute in the airlock), do you think it needs a yeast nutrient, or is it best to just leave it be and see how she goes?

Thanks

josh

brian92fs
10-25-2011, 12:15 PM
Bubbles in the airlock can be a misleading indicator. You really need a hydrometer to accurately gauge progress.

Chevette Girl
10-25-2011, 12:20 PM
Yeah, you really don't want to add any nutrients unless you're sure that the yeast have eaten 1/3 or less of the available sugar, and airlock bubbles cannot tell you this.