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hepcat
02-09-2012, 10:04 PM
Well I looked around on here and elsewhere online and could not find the answer to a question I have about b-brite cleanser/sanitizer. And it does not say on the container(which seems weird to me):

How long does contact with b-brite and brewing equipment need to be for effective sanitization? Thanks.

And any opinions on b-brite also appreciated. Thanks again.

maykal
02-10-2012, 12:51 AM
Found this on another site somewhere:


B-Brite is very effective in cleaning and sanitizing, but it does cost more than TSP and bleach. B-Brite has the active ingredient, Sodium Percarbonate. This is a mixture of sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide. The sodium carbonate is for cleaning and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) provides the sanitization. The sanitizing time for B-Brite is 15 minutes. B-Brite is also very effective at reducing odors and is not environmentally damaging. Use as directed.

Hope it helps.

hepcat
02-10-2012, 10:22 AM
Thanks maykal!

Loadnabox
02-10-2012, 11:13 AM
I'm always a proponent of Star-San or iodophor because they're contact sanitizers.

Instead of having to soak you can use them from a spray bottle.

If it really does that 15 minutes for B-Brite then oxyclean is a better alternative, it would only take 5 minutes for 1 scoop/gallon of oxyclean to sanitize.

hepcat
02-10-2012, 03:33 PM
Good to know, loadnabox.
So by contact sanitizer you mean it's a no-rinse sanitizer?



I'm always a proponent of Star-San or iodophor because they're contact sanitizers.

Instead of having to soak you can use them from a spray bottle.

If it really does that 15 minutes for B-Brite then oxyclean is a better alternative, it would only take 5 minutes for 1 scoop/gallon of oxyclean to sanitize.

Loadnabox
02-10-2012, 03:35 PM
Good to know loadnabox.
So by contact sanitzer, you mean it's a no-rinse sanitizer?

It is no rinse as well, but it does all it's killing in under 1 second so soaking is by no means required. That's why it works to spritz it on an object with a spray bottle. Not all sanitizers can do that, many require a good soak.

hepcat
02-10-2012, 03:44 PM
Thanks again loadnabox! I'm def gonna get some starsan today. Cheers!

akueck
02-11-2012, 05:01 AM
B-brite is no-rinse because it is low concentration, thus the long contact time. Oxyclean, PBW, or similar are higher concentration of the same stuff as b-brite (sodium percarbonate) and will sanitize quickly, but should be rinsed off due to the high salt content. If you rinse with sterile water, you're fine, otherwise you need to do a sanitizing cycle anyway with something like Iodophor or StarSan. The nice thing about B-brite is that it is also a mild cleaner (unlike Iodophor or StarSan which only sanitize) so if your stuff is a tiny bit dirty it will take care of the dirt and then sanitize it all in one step. Funny enough, another no-rinse version of percarbonate is called 1-step.

Contact time for Iodophor and StarSan is usually more like a minute or two, not just 1 second. StarSan in particular has a surfactant, however, that will keep it in contact with surfaces for quite some time before it sheets off or dries. This way a spray bottle is very effective. Iodophor would not work as well as a spray since it does not have the surfactant.

Smoky Mountain Reign
02-11-2012, 10:27 AM
How long will the Star Sans in a spray bottle (mixed per the manufacturer's directions) stay effective? I make 1/2 a spray bottle, about 500 mL, and it lasts me for months. Any concerns?

chams
02-11-2012, 11:44 AM
How long will the Star Sans in a spray bottle (mixed per the manufacturer's directions) stay effective? I make 1/2 a spray bottle, about 500 mL, and it lasts me for months. Any concerns?

If you make it with distilled water it keeps well. A few months I've heard.

hepcat
02-11-2012, 04:51 PM
Thanks very much for that sanitizer info akueck!

akueck
02-11-2012, 05:50 PM
StarSan tends to get cloudy as it ages. If it's cloudy, toss it and make some new stuff. The best way to tell is the pH: if it is below 3 then it is good to go. As mentioned, if you make it with distilled water it should last for awhile. With tap water, maybe only a few days to a week.

Smoky Mountain Reign
02-12-2012, 08:12 AM
"...With tap water, maybe only a few days to a week."

Good to know. I'm on well water. I'm buying some distilled water for StarSans first chance I get!

Loadnabox
02-13-2012, 03:41 PM
B-brite is no-rinse because it is low concentration, thus the long contact time. Oxyclean, PBW, or similar are higher concentration of the same stuff as b-brite (sodium percarbonate) and will sanitize quickly, but should be rinsed off due to the high salt content. If you rinse with sterile water, you're fine, otherwise you need to do a sanitizing cycle anyway with something like Iodophor or StarSan. The nice thing about B-brite is that it is also a mild cleaner (unlike Iodophor or StarSan which only sanitize) so if your stuff is a tiny bit dirty it will take care of the dirt and then sanitize it all in one step. Funny enough, another no-rinse version of percarbonate is called 1-step.

Contact time for Iodophor and StarSan is usually more like a minute or two, not just 1 second. StarSan in particular has a surfactant, however, that will keep it in contact with surfaces for quite some time before it sheets off or dries. This way a spray bottle is very effective. Iodophor would not work as well as a spray since it does not have the surfactant.



Interesting, I ran into a webcast with a VP of BTF on their iodophor product. He made very dissimilar claims, I'll see if I can dig it up.

EDIT:

Here it is (http://media.libsyn.com/media/basicbrewing/bbr03-22-07.mp3) Though it's actually national chemical, not BTF as I recalled.

akueck
02-14-2012, 07:04 PM
I'm paying by the byte here in the cafe, so I'll have to listen later. What did he say? Spray bottles are good? If they have a surfactant in there, that makes all the difference. You don't need to have the thing underwater, just a surface layer of sanitizer is enough.

Another variable is concentration. If you mix it up to a higher concentration, it will work faster (to a point...). You run the risk of crossing the no-rinse line though, depending on what kind of surface you're spraying and how vigorous you are.

hepcat
02-15-2012, 03:56 PM
The StarSan directions also say: For all applications, allow to air dry(but surface must remain wet for at least one minute), do not rinse after application.

So, do y'all do that? Let it air dry before you use what you sanitized?
Because if you do, I don't see the big advantage time wise, over what I've been doing(bleach in water for 15 minutes) since it would take I would think, a good 15+ minutes for whatever you sprayed with the StarSan to air dry....

"Contact time for Iodophor and StarSan is usually more like a minute or two, not just 1 second. StarSan in particular has a surfactant, however, that will keep it in contact with surfaces for quite some time before it sheets off or dries. This way a spray bottle is very effective." Akueck

Loadnabox
02-15-2012, 04:07 PM
I'm paying by the byte here in the cafe, so I'll have to listen later. What did he say? Spray bottles are good? If they have a surfactant in there, that makes all the difference. You don't need to have the thing underwater, just a surface layer of sanitizer is enough.

Another variable is concentration. If you mix it up to a higher concentration, it will work faster (to a point...). You run the risk of crossing the no-rinse line though, depending on what kind of surface you're spraying and how vigorous you are.

It's been a while since I listened to the whole thing.

As I recall (memories being the funny things they are) he said the instructions on the bottle call for a 2 minute soak because that is the health code restaurant standards, however, it works just fine as a surfectant on non-porous materials.

He is very specific that things that have nooks and crannies to get into provide hiding spots for uglies (as we all well know) and a short soak is recommended for those items.

akueck
02-18-2012, 12:34 AM
Probably true, those recommendations come from The Man and thus have large safety factors. (Can't have bacteria in your food now...) Still I'd trust StarSan in a spray bottle a little more than Iodophor. But most important is that the surface is wet, so if you see that the Iodophor spray keeps it wet then it is all good. ;D