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Altricious
03-05-2012, 09:10 PM
I can see where this is going to be addictive. I was in the store today and a pineapple called out to me. First it said, "Don't I look yummy?" Then when I got home it said, "Make something with me!" Now it's eyeing my honey.

So, I searched the forums to get an idea what other people have done in the realm of pineapple mead. To me, ginger is an obvious compliment. My question is really pineapple prep. My instinct is to skin, core and make mush. However, some of the recipes I read mentioned grilling or caramelizing the pineapple. I know it's tasty to eat that way, but what does it add in mead?

Thanks.

triarchy
03-06-2012, 11:23 AM
Ive never made a pineapple mead, but Id expect that the flavors you get from grilling the pineapple would transfer (even if is is muted) into the mead. My suggestion, go buy another pineapple and make two meads. One grilled pinapple and one normal. Then you tell which you prefer. An added bonus is twice the mead to drink ;D

TAKeyser
03-06-2012, 11:44 AM
I guess I've gotten used to facebook since I was looking for the like button on Triarchy's comment lol
I can't help but walking through the produce section at the market and wondering what would make a good mead.

TheAlchemist
03-06-2012, 02:36 PM
You can "like" something here by giving a "reputation point." Just click on the "scales of justice" in the upper R corner of the post (next to the post #).

TAKeyser
03-06-2012, 02:39 PM
good to know, thanks for the info.

Chevette Girl
03-06-2012, 11:43 PM
IMy suggestion, go buy another pineapple and make two meads. One grilled pinapple and one normal. Then you tell which you prefer.

And of course, tell us!!

skunkboy
03-06-2012, 11:47 PM
Straight pineapple meads are nice too...

TAKeyser
03-07-2012, 12:16 AM
My experience wit pineapple mead is that they take a while to taste like pineapple. Sampled at 6 months tasted like mead, sampled at 12 months tasted like mead, sampled again at 18 months and tasted like Pineapple mead.

greenbucks
03-07-2012, 03:47 AM
My experience wit pineapple mead is that they take a while to taste like pineapple. Sampled at 6 months tasted like mead, sampled at 12 months tasted like mead, sampled again at 18 months and tasted like Pineapple mead.

Would adding fruit to primary help bring out the flavor sooner? Or adding fruit on secondary is another option. I know someone who prefers to add fruit on secondary and his blueberry tastes fruitier in the end.

TAKeyser
03-07-2012, 12:45 PM
I've done it both ways as well as splitting the fruit up between the Primary and Secondary. It's all a matter of personal preference. My preference is the Primary, but many believe placing it in secondary will leave more of the aroma and flavor since they won't be blown out by the fermentation. I tend to just pitch a little more than I think is necessary in the Primary as I just feel safer that the active yeast will beat up any bacteria that may remain on the fruit.

Altricious
03-07-2012, 01:03 PM
Well, I'm not doing two, mainly because I'm not spending $2 on gas for a $2 pineapple. That's just silly. Next time I shop, if there's another lovely overripe pineapple, I'll consider starting a second batch. It'll just have to be a week or 2 out of sync with the first.

TAKeyser
03-07-2012, 01:23 PM
Wish I had that kind of self control Altricious, I haven't made a batch in 36 hours and I'm going through some major withdrawals. Sadly it has to wait until the weekend which happens to be after payday.

Sadie Lady
03-07-2012, 01:35 PM
I've done it both ways as well as splitting the fruit up between the Primary and Secondary.

When you put the fruit in secondary, you just push some through the carboy opening? You don't put it back in a bucket, right?

Or do you rack it from the primary fermenter onto some fruit after the SG has stopped dropping, then later rack to a carboy?

TAKeyser
03-07-2012, 01:46 PM
When you put the fruit in secondary, you just push some through the carboy opening? You don't put it back in a bucket, right?

Or do you rack it from the primary fermenter onto some fruit after the SG has stopped dropping, then later rack to a carboy?

When I am putting fruit into secondary I will usually use a weighted grain bag (or whatever those things are called) and I'll just put the bag into the carboy empty with the top of the bag over the neck and than stuff the fruit through the opening (hope that makes sense). I pull up the bag, tie a knot in it, rack the mead onto it and than use the bung to hold the bag in place a little off the bottom. Depending on the fruit it can sometimes be a pain to get out of the carboy, small things like berries are pretty easy though.

Sadie Lady
03-07-2012, 05:15 PM
Thanks TAKeyser,
I wondered how you did that. I have a 3 gallon traditional mead that is over a hear old and thought about racking a gallon of it on some blueberries I have in the freezer. I've had pineapple mead somewhere and it was really good.

TAKeyser
03-07-2012, 05:19 PM
You won't have any problem getting the blueberries out of the carboy when your done. I usually leave it on the fruit for about 14 days (making sure it remains beneath the level of the liquid, which is why I weigh it down since I don't want to risk opening it and pushing the fruit down every day like I do when it is in primary).

I enjoy the pineapple i just find it takes some time before those flavors come out to the level I want.

Matrix4b
03-08-2012, 11:19 AM
I did a Pineapple Lime mint with 5 pineapples that I juiced and it was a 5 gal batch. It did not have much pineapple flavor.

I would go with more than 1. Possible 2 pineapples per gal of mead.

Matrix

Altricious
03-08-2012, 03:50 PM
Well, I threw it together at noon today. I fully expect to have to make further additions at secondary, but here's where we start:

1 gallon batch
1 whole pineapple, peeled, cored, pureed (~ 4 cups)
3 lbs clover honey
3 tbsp fresh minced ginger (~1oz)

I'm using KI-V1116 for yeast.


When I get around to picking up the second pineapple, I'll stick to the same batch, but sear the pineapple in a pan before sticking it in the blender. I really doubt there's going to be a big difference in the result, but I'll be sure to age at least one bottle of each for a couple years in case it takes that long to sort itself out.

It's hard. My impatience and procrastination are always at odds.

Chevette Girl
03-08-2012, 11:15 PM
It's hard. My impatience and procrastination are always at odds.

Oh, do I ever hear you loud and clear on that one...

USMCMatt
03-09-2012, 11:21 AM
Well, I threw it together at noon today. I fully expect to have to make further additions at secondary, but here's where we start:

1 gallon batch
1 whole pineapple, peeled, cored, pureed (~ 4 cups)
3 lbs clover honey
3 tbsp fresh minced ginger (~1oz)

I'm using KI-V1116 for yeast.


When I get around to picking up the second pineapple, I'll stick to the same batch, but sear the pineapple in a pan before sticking it in the blender. I really doubt there's going to be a big difference in the result, but I'll be sure to age at least one bottle of each for a couple years in case it takes that long to sort itself out.

It's hard. My impatience and procrastination are always at odds.

Are you going to rack it onto more pineapple in the secondary or just let it ride?

Altricious
03-09-2012, 11:36 AM
Are you going to rack it onto more pineapple in the secondary or just let it ride?

Probably more... maybe a half? More ginger too.

:)

Altricious
03-13-2012, 04:12 PM
Went shopping today. The pineapples were decidedly greener than last time, but I got two anyway. (I passed on the one that must have been left from last time because it had passed ripe and moved on to shriveling and brown.) So, I think the second batch is still going to have to wait because I'd like to let the pineapple sit until it's got a little more color.

The fermenting batch is chugging away. Looked like it passed the halfway mark yesterday, but with the fruit it's harder to measure. I can definitely smell and taste the pineapple and ginger.

Hopefully, the pineapples I bought will be ready when the primary looks finished so I can rack onto a half plus a little more ginger.

Altricious
03-16-2012, 11:04 PM
Well, I did the second one around noon today. I cut the pineapple in slices 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick, then seared them (both sides) in a pan until they were golden. The pineapple was thoroughly cooked through when I finished. When I blended it up, it was about half the volume of the raw equivalent. I used the exact same ingredients otherwise.

There's a few obvious differences already. The raw one has been a bright pineapple yellow from day one. This one is a rich amber. It also looks like there isn't going to be much of a fruit pack on top of the cooked one. The raw one constantly had an inch or two of pineapple on top that I constantly had to turn back into the must. (At this point it's starting to lessen.) In the cooked one, there's a lot less pulpy pineapple because of the cooking and it seems not to be rising to the top as much.

I'll try to take a picture tomorrow.

Old_Skool
03-17-2012, 12:02 AM
When it comes to pineapples there are only two kinds to buy:

- Fly to Maui (not the best of the islands but they grow a lot of pineapple) then find a fruit seller who will usually have ripe fresh fruits. You don't go to the store even in Hawaii ... stores only have unripened fruit. The best sweetest pineapple are hard to find and reserved for the best restaurants and high end stores ... and local some local vendors.

- Find a local store in your area that sells Costa Rican pineapples. These are also sweet as candy. They are a smaller variety and very sweet.

Everything else is pretty much highly acidic crap. The pineapple trucks on Maui are freaking huge - like super-duper dump trucks. They barely fit on the roads. In the front of each huge huge dump bin is a basket the size of a large shopping cart. In that basket are the vine ripened super sweet fruit. Everything else is suitable for canning (lots of sugar added) or shipping around the world.

Altricious
03-17-2012, 10:51 AM
When it comes to pineapples there are only two kinds to buy:

- Fly to Maui (not the best of the islands but they grow a lot of pineapple) then find a fruit seller who will usually have ripe fresh fruits. You don't go to the store even in Hawaii ... stores only have unripened fruit. The best sweetest pineapple are hard to find and reserved for the best restaurants and high end stores ... and local some local vendors.

- Find a local store in your area that sells Costa Rican pineapples. These are also sweet as candy. They are a smaller variety and very sweet.

Everything else is pretty much highly acidic crap. The pineapple trucks on Maui are freaking huge - like super-duper dump trucks. They barely fit on the roads. In the front of each huge huge dump bin is a basket the size of a large shopping cart. In that basket are the vine ripened super sweet fruit. Everything else is suitable for canning (lots of sugar added) or shipping around the world.

Well, none of that is really an option. If you can afford to fly to Maui for your pineapples, good for you, but that's a bit beyond my means. I also don't live anywhere where I would find anything other than the boring normal pineapples.

You did forget the 3rd option. You can always grow your own pineapples at home as a houseplant. Then you can let them fully ripen on the plant and be 100 times better, or so I'm told. The only problem there is that they're a pain to get started, they take forever to grow, and they're obnoxiously sized plants compared to what you get from them. So, also not on my list of things to actually do.

machalel
03-18-2012, 06:10 PM
Mmmm... Pineapple mead...

Damn you people! Stop giving me ideas, I've already got more on my to-do list than I can make! :P

Now I need to make a plain pineapple mead as well as a super-caramelised one and compare

TheAlchemist
03-18-2012, 08:21 PM
Damn you people! Stop giving me ideas, I've already got more on my to-do list than I can make! :P



Bwaaaaa! Another to-do lister!

TAKeyser
03-19-2012, 10:34 AM
Damn you people! Stop giving me ideas, I've already got more on my to-do list than I can make! :P

The to-do list is why I love 1 gallon carboys and 2 gallon buckets.

Altricious
03-19-2012, 11:09 AM
Mmmm... Pineapple mead...

Damn you people! Stop giving me ideas, I've already got more on my to-do list than I can make! :P

Now I need to make a plain pineapple mead as well as a super-caramelised one and compare

How do you think I feel? I was going to make one gallon of pineapple and one of something else (probably black raspberry) because that's how much honey I had on hand.

Now, I've got two pineapples going for comparison AND a 60 lb bucket of honey on order.

I haven't really started a list though. Not for mead recipes anyway. My current list is "Things to plant for the new beehive and for fruit I might make mead out of"

Yes, I have found myself starting beekeeping as well.

TAKeyser
03-19-2012, 11:13 AM
Yes, I have found myself starting beekeeping as well.

Plant Raspberries and I can get my Raspberry Blossom honey from you.

Altricious
03-19-2012, 12:11 PM
Plant Raspberries and I can get my Raspberry Blossom honey from you.

30 years ago, my parent had 6+ acres of red raspberries. We took them to the farmer's market and operated a very popular u-pick business. For years, Dad talked about getting bees. If he had had any clue that a varietal honey would have been marketable like that, it wouldn't have been just talk.

Now, of course, the berries are long gone and we're all living in new places.

BTW, do you know how much f#$@*%g work that many acres of raspberries are?

YogiBearMead726
03-19-2012, 12:31 PM
Back to the mead, I think you'll find a wonderful difference in flavor between the two recipes. One will be like eating the fruit, one with something like a caramel coated pineapple.

Plus, you can always blend the two for an even more complex mead!

You might also consider making a brochet with pineapple if you prefer the second batch. Just my $0.02. :)

TAKeyser
03-19-2012, 12:32 PM
BTW, do you know how much f#$@*%g work that many acres of raspberries are?

I'm guessing a lot of work, but I don't have to do it :)

The apiary I get honey from haven't leased their bees to a Raspberry producer in a few years so I've only been able to get small amounts of my favorite honey.

YogiBearMead726
03-19-2012, 12:50 PM
The apiary I get honey from haven't leased their bees to a Raspberry producer in a few years so I've only been able to get small amounts of my favorite honey.

Well, if you don't mind getting non-local raw honey, the folks over at Flying Bee Ranch (http://www.flyingbeeranch.net/) have a wonderful raspberry honey. And if you buy at least two 6 lbs jugs, it works out to ~$3.60/lb. Their website says only 2 can fit in the shipping boxes, but in my last order they fit in 3, so I'd inquire about that...because then it works out to ~$3.30/lb.

Worth checking out, if you haven't already.

TAKeyser
03-19-2012, 01:00 PM
Well, if you don't mind getting non-local raw honey, the folks over at Flying Bee Ranch (http://www.flyingbeeranch.net/) have a wonderful raspberry honey. And if you buy at least two 6 lbs jugs, it works out to ~$3.60/lb. Their website says only 2 can fit in the shipping boxes, but in my last order they fit in 3, so I'd inquire about that...because then it works out to ~$3.30/lb.

Worth checking out, if you haven't already.

I prefer local, because well it supports local and is usually much cheaper since shipping is not involved. I have mail-ordered many times (we don't grow Oranges in Michigan so obviously I can't get local Orange Blossom honey) when I need to and those prices, though obviously higher, doesn't seem to bad so looks like I'll need to place an order on payday.

machalel
03-19-2012, 03:44 PM
You might also consider making a brochet with pineapple if you prefer the second batch. Just my $0.02. :)

noooooooo!!!! stop saying things!

:p

Chevette Girl
03-19-2012, 08:39 PM
noooooooo!!!! stop saying things!

:p

Welcome to my world (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showpost.php?p=174004&postcount=1)...

MJJ
04-19-2012, 12:08 PM
I started a Pineapple Mead a few days ago. It went volcano on me. Leave plenty of head space for the first few days.

Altricious
04-19-2012, 12:22 PM
I started a Pineapple Mead a few days ago. It went volcano on me. Leave plenty of head space for the first few days.

You're about a month late with that advice. I think a lot of CO2 gets trapped under the fruitpack and pushes the whole thing higher than you expect. It might be worse with the pineapple because it's very fibrous.

Chevette Girl
04-19-2012, 12:50 PM
Yeah, I think if I were to do it I'd bag it... makes life so much easier...

machalel
04-19-2012, 04:53 PM
You're about a month late with that advice. I think a lot of CO2 gets trapped under the fruitpack and pushes the whole thing higher than you expect. It might be worse with the pineapple because it's very fibrous.

I think you've hit the nail on the head. With my banana wine, when it was at its most vigorous, you could actually see the airgap underneath the cap as it was being pushed up the neck of the demijohn!

MJJ
04-23-2012, 03:16 AM
You're about a month late with that advice. I think a lot of CO2 gets trapped under the fruitpack and pushes the whole thing higher than you expect. It might be worse with the pineapple because it's very fibrous.

Sorry about that. I didn't use fresh pineapple, I used juice from Dole. What a mess it made.

Altricious
09-11-2012, 09:26 AM
I've been so patient with this. I didn't even taste when I racked off the fruit.

But yesterday, I decided to do some maintenance and taste all the batches that are quickly filling my counter.

Both of these have gone dry. The first one is at .990 and the grilled one is .993. The first one is very light and fresh and pineappely. The second one still tastes like pineapple, but toasty and more like the pineapple in baked goods rather than fresh like the first one.

I like them both, but I don't know which I like better. I guess I have to drink a bottle of both and see how it goes. But, I'm going to be a bit more patient. I think they may be even better with age.