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jpog
04-03-2012, 12:00 PM
What is a mead with just hops but no malt extract called? Just curious

mfalenski
04-03-2012, 12:03 PM
What is a mead with just hops but no malt extract called? Just curious

A metheglin, but we just call it "Hopped Mead" :)

TAKeyser
04-03-2012, 12:07 PM
What is a mead with just hops but no malt extract called? Just curious

Don't know if it has an actual name (though I'm sure someone came up with one since the last decade has produced a growing list of Mead styles) but I know it tastes great. I have a Sweet Hopped Mead and a Dry Hopped Mead aging right now. It's still young but the taste testing has me favoring the dry right now

BrewinNColorado
04-03-2012, 12:15 PM
What is a mead with just hops but no malt extract called? Just curious

mfalenski is correct, it is just a metheglin

just curious, how do you plan on hopping the mead? I ask because boiling will cause the bitterness, so you'll have to back-sweeten it to counter. If you dry-hop it, then you get the flavor and the aroma without the bitterness.

A good example of a dry-hopped mead is Redstone's Nectar of the Hops...
Medium Sweet
8% Alcohol
5 parts Clover honey, 1 part Wildflower honey
Carbonated
Dry hopped! Food Pairings: Mild cheeses, barbeque, seafood and more!

akueck
04-03-2012, 12:19 PM
A metheglin, but we just call it "Hopped Mead" :)

Yep, this. Just to expand, hops fall under the "herbs and spices" category of things you can add to mead, and a metheglin is an "herb and spice" mead.

jpog
04-03-2012, 02:26 PM
So how do you dry hop the mead..just add the hops to the 2nd stage fermentor and let it soak in it for months before racking it to bottles?

TAKeyser
04-03-2012, 02:32 PM
So how do you dry hop the mead..just add the hops to the 2nd stage fermentor and let it soak in it for months before racking it to bottles?

A week or two should be more than enough time.

Altricious
04-03-2012, 03:01 PM
What is a mead with just hops but no malt extract called? Just curious

This list says it's a miodomel. Don't think it's a well known term though.

http://www.solorb.com/mead/

TAKeyser
04-03-2012, 03:05 PM
This list says it's a miodomel. Don't think it's a well known term though.

http://www.solorb.com/mead/

Like I said earlier I think some of the names are more modern inventions because people just have to have a name for what they are making. My guess is everything other than Mead, Sack Mead, Hippocras, Methlegin, Melomel, Pyment, Cyser and Braggot or more modern invention but I have no info to back up my assumption.

Altricious
04-03-2012, 03:09 PM
Well, if we all get to make up words for our various types of meads, I'm calling all of mine Laurelomels, meaning "mead made by Laurel".

TAKeyser
04-03-2012, 03:18 PM
Well, if we all get to make up words for our various types of meads, I'm calling all of mine Laurelomels, meaning "mead made by Laurel".

Works for me ;)

jpog
04-03-2012, 04:38 PM
How many onces should you use per gallon, I also assume you can't use pellets, correct?

TAKeyser
04-03-2012, 04:49 PM
How many onces should you use per gallon, I also assume you can't use pellets, correct?

You can use pellets, whenever I use them I just put them in a hop bag with plenty of room for expansion. Even if you don't use the bag they'll eventually settle to the bottom. How much depends on how much flavor you want to get out of it. 1/4 oz should be enough for a bit of hop in a 1 gallon batch (I boiled 1/4 oz in a little bit of water for an hour to get some bitterness and than I split another 1/4 oz between the last 15 minutes [flavor hops] and when I turned off the heat [aroma hops]. I used another 1/2 oz dry hopping and it's pretty hoppy at the moment). 1 oz for a 5 gallon batch seems like the amount you see a lot in beer recipes that call for dry hopping, but that also takes into account that hops were added earlier.

paraordnance
04-03-2012, 05:44 PM
I very interested in trying to dry hop experimental 1 gal batch of traditional I have. I heard 0.5 oz per gallon is a good number. I also read somewhere that Cascades work great. But, pellets or cones? I have a pound of Citra hops on the way, I wonder if they also a good choice for dry hopping mead? :rolleyes:

mccann51
04-03-2012, 05:48 PM
A week or two should be more than enough time.

This is worth reiterating.

Don't go over two weeks (7-10 days is a typical recommendation) as the hops can begin to give off vegetal and grassy flavors that are in most cases not desirable.

TAKeyser
04-03-2012, 06:01 PM
I very interested in trying to dry hop experimental 1 gal batch of traditional I have. I heard 0.5 oz per gallon is a good number. I also read somewhere that Cascades work great. But, pellets or cones? I have a pound of Citra hops on the way, I wonder if they also a good choice for dry hopping mead? :rolleyes:

Any Hop can be used for Dry Hopping you just need to find one that has a flavor and aroma profile that you find pleasing. Many people love the citrusy flavor and aroma given off by Cascades which is one of the reasons they are one of the most popular hop varieties out there. You'll usually (but not always) see lower Alpha Acid hops used for dry hopping as Higher Alpha Hops can provide the nice Bitterness that comes out when hops are boiled. Citra with an Alpha Acid of on Average 12% are usually considered a Bittering Hop, but will work fine for Dry Hopping and are described as having a Gooseberry or Passion Fruit flavor.

akueck
04-03-2012, 10:43 PM
Whole hops are a little easier to use when dry hopping since they are large and easy to not transfer when racking (although the seeds sometimes float around independently). Pellet hops are nice for boiling because they don't hold as much liquid when you're emptying the boil kettle. But either can be used, the differences are marginal IMO.

Alpha acid content doesn't matter for dry hopping, you won't get any of those to dissolve without boiling. All you want is a hop variety that smells nice. If you like fruity citrus aroma, you can use one of the Cs (e.g. cascade). Piney/herbal, earthy, floral, etc are other aromas you might find in other varieties.

New2mead
04-04-2012, 08:54 AM
Well, if we all get to make up words for our various types of meads, I'm calling all of mine Laurelomels, meaning "mead made by Laurel".

I like that! Rolls right off the tongue. 'Course, you'll have to send some to all of us so we can start using the name right away.

Altricious
04-04-2012, 11:13 AM
I like that! Rolls right off the tongue. 'Course, you'll have to send some to all of us so we can start using the name right away.

You buy me honey and I'll send you mead. Federal laws be damned.

mfalenski
04-04-2012, 11:59 AM
So how do you dry hop the mead..just add the hops to the 2nd stage fermentor and let it soak in it for months before racking it to bottles?


We boil water for about 45-60 minutes with a measure of hops to get bitterness, then we dry hop to get more aroma. Usually dry hop for a few weeks.

mfalenski
04-04-2012, 12:05 PM
Like I said earlier I think some of the names are more modern inventions because people just have to have a name for what they are making. My guess is everything other than Mead, Sack Mead, Hippocras, Methlegin, Melomel, Pyment, Cyser and Braggot or more modern invention but I have no info to back up my assumption.


We find that many people don't even know what mead is, let alone all of the sub categories! We just name our based on what's in it for simplicity. Traditional Mead,
Triple Berry Mead, Hopped Mead, Chocolate Mead.

We do call it a Bochet instead of Burned Honey Mead though!

TAKeyser
04-04-2012, 12:08 PM
We find that many people don't even know what mead is, let alone all of the sub categories! We just name our based on what's in it for simplicity. Traditional Mead,
Triple Berry Mead, Hopped Mead, Chocolate Mead.

I would call the Triple Berry a melomel, but other than that I agree ;D


We do call it a Bochet instead of Burned Honey Mead though!

That's because Burnt Honey Mead just doesn't sound all that appealing and Bochet makes it sound Fancy

Chevette Girl
04-09-2012, 03:16 AM
I would call the Triple Berry a melomel, but other than that I agree ;D


I'd probably use the term bochet on the labels if I ever get around to making one, but I still usually list fruit type and then wine/mead depending on fermentable sugar... just so it doesn't confuse people, since I don't expect the people to whom I give my meads to know more than one word for "wine-like substance made with honey instead of sugar".

Although now that I think about it, I believe I did use the term "cyser" on the last batch of crabapple cyser I bottled.

That, and I dislike the word melomel as much as I like the word metheglin, I think it sounds silly... although in my own logs, I list it as a mead if it's traditional, a mel if it's got fruit (this includes cysers and pyments), meth if it's got herbs or spices, and a JAO if I used bread yeast and 3.5 lb of honey...

TAKeyser
04-09-2012, 03:21 AM
I'd probably use the term bochet on the labels if I ever get around to making one, but I still usually list fruit type and then wine/mead depending on fermentable sugar... just so it doesn't confuse people, since I don't expect the people to whom I give my meads to know more than one word for "wine-like substance made with honey instead of sugar".


Don't think about the correct terms as "confusing" to the people you give them to, think of it as "educating" them on the complexity of the fermenting addiction (oh I mean hobby)

HunnyBunz
04-09-2012, 08:43 PM
That, and I dislike the word melomel as much as I like the word metheglin

I totally agree with that statement. When I first began learning about mead and the different sub-catagories I just fell in love with the term metheglin. Especially after learning that it is derived from two Welsh words: meddig - from the Latin medicus, meaning medicine or medical; and lyn, meaning alcohol.
And yes, melomel just sounds like something from a children's program.

Yeah, I know I'm way off topic. Just had to say...

Penguinetti
04-12-2012, 11:26 AM
Well, if we all get to make up words for our various types of meads, I'm calling all of mine Laurelomels, meaning "mead made by Laurel".

We get to make up names? Sweet! Although, Sanguinomels makes everything sound...


.... bloody.


...That's because Burnt Honey Mead just doesn't sound all that appealing and Bochet makes it sound Fancy

Fancy, so it's pronounced all french-like, 'Boshey'?


[COLOR="Purple"]...That, and I dislike the word melomel as much as I like the word metheglin, I think it sounds silly...

I totally agree with that statement. When I first began learning about mead and the different sub-catagories I just fell in love with the term metheglin. Especially after learning that it is derived from two Welsh words: meddig - from the Latin medicus, meaning medicine or medical; and lyn, meaning alcohol...

i have to agree with you both. Metheglin just sounds so :cool:

Also, I had no idea that it mean medical alcohol. Isn't that a bit redundant, tho... :rolleyes:

Altricious
04-12-2012, 02:57 PM
Fancy, so it's pronounced all french-like, 'Boshey'?


Unless you're a redneck, yes.

Penguinetti
04-12-2012, 04:22 PM
Hey, this whole time I've been saying 'botchet'. Like 'crotchet'.


:shrug:

Altricious
04-12-2012, 05:12 PM
Hey, this whole time I've been saying 'botchet'. Like 'crotchet'.


:shrug:

Um, if you pronounce crotchet like crow-shay, then that's the correct french way and the equivalent for bochet would be bo-shay.

If you're pronouncing crotchet like crot-chet (or worse yet crotch-it), then you need more help than I can offer.

Penguinetti
04-12-2012, 05:30 PM
Um, if you pronounce crotchet like crow-shay, then that's the correct french way and the equivalent for bochet would be bo-shay.

If you're pronouncing crotchet like crot-chet (or worse yet crotch-it), then you need more help than I can offer.

Well then, I must hang my head, cause I've been saying it crotch-it and botch-it this whole time...



Will you guys ever forgive me? http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-saYh5WfGHOY/TZLo1uV04PI/AAAAAAAAADE/8w2gLMIqPWE/s1600/puppy_eyes-2.jpg

HunnyBunz
04-12-2012, 05:45 PM
Well then, I must hang my head, cause I've been saying it crotch-it and botch-it this whole time...

Will you guys ever forgive me?


Yes, you're forgiven...ya big baby! ;)

Penguinetti
04-12-2012, 06:04 PM
Yes, you're forgiven...ya big baby! ;)

Awe, I knew you'd forgive me HunnyBunz the Mead Swilling Viking...

:laughing7:

Altricious
04-12-2012, 06:58 PM
Well then, I must hang my head, cause I've been saying it crotch-it and botch-it this whole time...


Will you guys ever forgive me?

I suppose. I mean, you are from Maine and we know some of you guys can be a little strange up there.

Penguinetti
04-12-2012, 07:10 PM
A little?!

I have seen some truely....

eh...

I don't want to say wierd... Not because it's impolite or anything, but because it would be an understatement.

Altricious
04-12-2012, 07:16 PM
A little?!

I have seen some truely....

eh...

I don't want to say wierd... Not because it's impolite or anything, but because it would be an understatement.

Those from the north part of Maine are even stranger.

Penguinetti
04-13-2012, 08:09 AM
Those from the north part of Maine are even stranger.

So I've been told... I haven't ventured past Portland, except once to go recruit at UMaine Orono.


Don't know if it has an actual name (though I'm sure someone came up with one since the last decade has produced a growing list of Mead styles) but I know it tastes great. I have a Sweet Hopped Mead and a Dry Hopped Mead aging right now. It's still young but the taste testing has me favoring the dry right now


What about the dry do you prefer? Are you more of a dry man from the beginning, or is it just particularly with the hops that has you favoring it?

TAKeyser
04-13-2012, 08:37 AM
What about the dry do you prefer? Are you more of a dry man from the beginning, or is it just particularly with the hops that has you favoring it?

I don't like super-sweets meads, but I prefer Meads it in the semi-sweet range more than dry meads (but I've tasted some great dry meads). At the moment the hops just seem to come out more in the dry. I'm hoping that the flavors meld together more in the sweet.