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View Full Version : How To Use Campden Tablets



SandorClegane
06-08-2012, 03:39 PM
Iím new to this, so I donít know much. Iím finding a lot of people saying they ďcrushĒ their tablets and add them in at every other racking, 1 tablet per gallon.
How do you guys use the tablets? How do you crush them? Like with a (sterilized) meat mallet? Do you add them to boiling water first or something to make sure you arenít adding anything impure to the Mead?

HunnyBunz
06-08-2012, 03:53 PM
I use a small mortar & pestle for crushing most things, but another good option is to put your tablet/s in a baggie and use the back of a spoon to crush them.

If you've got something that's pretty hard, lightly tapping with a hammer will work better than a spoon.

Wijnand
06-08-2012, 04:07 PM
Mine I can just crush by placing one between my thumb and index finger and pressing hard.

akueck
06-08-2012, 06:32 PM
Back of spoon is the way I go.

fatbloke
06-09-2012, 02:36 AM
Either in a mortice and pestle, or just between 2 identical teaspoons.

Chevette Girl
06-10-2012, 07:15 PM
Crush and sprinkle, usually between two spoons is how I end up doing it. I may switch to the baggie method if I remember next time, at least that way I won't risk losing a chunk as it flies out from between the spoons.

And if you add it to water rather than adding it dry, use boiled and cooled water in a sanitized container, heat will mess up the metabisulphites.

Usually we don't worry too much about anything that might tag along at this point, not only has your mead got a significant alcohol content to combat infections, but it's like worrying about getting dirt on your soap...

scottv
06-13-2012, 04:01 PM
what is the campden tablet used during every racking do?

TAKeyser
06-13-2012, 04:06 PM
what is the campden tablet used during every racking do?

That's an old practice and I really don't think anyone does it anymore. It's supposed to inhibit any bacteria from taking hold and can held reduce oxidation, but good sanitizing practices and topping off will do the same thing without risking off flavors from using too many Campden tablets (especially since some are Sodium metaBisulfite).

Sourcheese
06-13-2012, 06:25 PM
uh oh, I just dropped them in as tablets. 1 per gallon. Never crushed them. lol 12 gallons in already!

akueck
06-13-2012, 08:00 PM
They'll dissolve if you leave them whole. It just takes longer. ;D

Generally you want to get the sulfite level up pretty much right away, which is why crushing the tabs is a good idea.

Valhalla Mead
06-13-2012, 09:09 PM
Invest in a mortar and pestle. You can find them anywhere and they're very handy for a multitude of things.

Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

Tucker
11-28-2016, 07:50 PM
Is it absolutely necessary to use campden tablets, and if so at what points during the fermentations should I use them? Thanks!

pdh
11-28-2016, 10:56 PM
> Is it absolutely necessary to use campden tablets, and if so at what points during the fermentations should I use them?

I used to use them at the very beginning, before pitching yeast. I don't do that anymore. Now I use them only at the very very end, in combination with potassium sorbate to stabilize finished mead before backsweetening. If I don't backsweeten, then I don't use them at all.

I don't think there's any provably good reason to use them at any other time, unless you're starting with raw fruit or juice that's very likely to be carrying wild yeast.

Squatchy
11-29-2016, 12:17 AM
I would still use sulfites even if you don't plan to backsweeten. It will help to preserve your stuff much longer, protect it from oxidation if using fruit and many people have had bottles start back up even after years of sitting around inactive.

Also. It seems there are 2 different tabs on the market. I would suggest using potasium meta rather than sodium meta to avoid the salty flavor from the sodium. I buy mine in powder form so I don't have to mess with tabs.

And BTW. In spite of common misconception. Sulfites do not cause allergic reactions near as much as we are led to believe. Less than 1% have allergic reactions. Sulfites are found naturally and people eat them every day of their lives. See here

http://www.newworldwinemaker.com/2010/06/are-you-allergic-to-sulfites/

http://www.thekitchn.com/the-truth-about-sulfites-in-wine-myths-of-red-wine-headaches-100878

http://vinepair.com/wine-geekly/whats-deal-sulfites/

http://www.bonappetit.com/drinks/wine/article/sulfite-free-wine

http://www.beekmanwine.com/prevtopbd.htm

Maylar
11-29-2016, 09:48 AM
And BTW. In spite of common misconception. Sulfites do not cause allergic reactions near as much as we are led to believe. Less than 1% have allergic reactions. Sulfites are found naturally and people eat them every day of their lives. See here


Unfortunately for those 1% it's no joke. And contrary to those links, there are other symptoms besides asthma. Here's a quote from a recent thread in the cider forum at HBT -


So every time I have some of my cider (doesn't matter the batch), I get a really bad blush on cheeks and quite often my hands swell up (to the point I cannot move my band on my finger which is normally loose) and my face feels like I have a sunburn.

...and it's kinda gettting worse.

When I bottled some cider at a local brewery (they force carb'd it) he was a little concerned how red I became after drinking a glass. Never thought anything of it. This is definitely worse with my ciders than commercial ones.

I'm using one campden per gallon, then at first racking I'm using 1/4 tsp k-meta for 6 gallons total. At bottling I've been adding 1/8 tsp k-meta for all remaining 5.5 gallons or so.

I don't drink wine often (couple times a year) but do get this feeling when I have it.

...and I have 150L of cider on currently....

if I can't have sulfites - what now? Most of my ciders are in secondary and are about 6-8 weeks old from pitching

and drinking straight rum - I have no problems with the above.


And a reply ...


I had a very similar issue a few years back - The first time it happened my wife thought I was in serious trouble and after a few instances and a visit to my doctor found it to be a hypersensitivity to any of the "ates" Sulfate, phosphate etc.