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Aqualab
11-01-2012, 02:52 PM
Found a supplier of clover honey that filters and flash heats the honey to approximately 185F - I believe I read this is not ideal - anyone?

fatbloke
11-01-2012, 03:05 PM
Well, while I much prefer raw honey, but beggars can't be choosers.......

It may have lost a small amount of aromatics and/or subtle flavours, bit it should be fine....

Aqualab
11-01-2012, 03:32 PM
thanks Fatbloke

Intheswamp
11-01-2012, 07:01 PM
The main reason for filtering and heating is to reduce the honey's ability to crystallize. Crystals form around pollen particles so removing the pollen reduces the honey's ability to crystallize. Heating the crystal makes it easier to force the honey through fine mesh filters. Pollen imparts a lot of the taste, color, and aroma to the honey. There has been a severe problem of illegal importation of Chinese honey over the last several years...to the tune of thousands of *containers*. These are being redirected through Vietnam and other Asian countries. The problem is that this is adulterated syrup, not honey. The little bit of honey that is in the syrup has been super-filtered to remove the pollen which is the fingerprint of the honey and would tell it's point of origin if it hadn't been removed. http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/08/honey-laundering/

As for the guy you found that's processing the honey this way...if he's doing filtering and heating it himself then he should have raw honey, too. See if you can buy some before he cooks it.

A good reason to find a large hobbiest or sideliner...buy RAW local honey. ;)

Ed

Chevette Girl
11-01-2012, 10:06 PM
The honey you get from this place is still honey and can still make good mead. If you can get it raw, even better, but if you can't, as long as the honey tastes and smells good, it will make good mead.

tweak'e
11-02-2012, 12:31 AM
flash heating is quickly heating it up hot and cooling it back down very quickly. this is done to keep the clover runny in the bottles.
it doesn't mean its ultra filtrated.

Busymust
11-02-2012, 01:46 PM
I have had the best luck in my mead batches by purchasing honey direct from beekeepers, and using raw, unfiltered, unfiddled with honey, which has the pollens still present. I also have had good luck with plain Gunthers Honey from the local organic food market. I did try some "organic" honey on one of my first batches, but the beekeepers tell me that "organic" honey is really not doable - noone can guarantee every bee stayed on the bounds of the organic farm!;)

I have heard of the problems of commercial honey supplies being polluted by adulteration with high fructose corn syrup and other substances. I see that In The Swamp posted a link which is the same one I saw.

Aqualab
11-02-2012, 02:18 PM
Thanks everyone for your replies and information/suggestions. I originally ordered 30lbs of honey from an apiery located in south Jersey last week - right before the storm hit. Pretty sure they were severely impacted by where they are in relation to where the storm hit. So I went ahead and bought 35 lbs of Blossom Hill bulk clover honey (which is Dutch Gold honey) from the webstaurant online store. The price was right and I will have it in time to start a new batch next week. Looking at the ingredient spec which they have as a PDF, it says the honey is flash heated and filtered. So that is why I questioned using it, didn't want to order if it was not recommended.

Thanks

THawk
11-04-2012, 05:55 AM
Thanks everyone for your replies and information/suggestions. I originally ordered 30lbs of honey from an apiery located in south Jersey last week - right before the storm hit. Pretty sure they were severely impacted by where they are in relation to where the storm hit. So I went ahead and bought 35 lbs of Blossom Hill bulk clover honey (which is Dutch Gold honey) from the webstaurant online store. The price was right and I will have it in time to start a new batch next week. Looking at the ingredient spec which they have as a PDF, it says the honey is flash heated and filtered. So that is why I questioned using it, didn't want to order if it was not recommended.

Thanks

Try Flying Bee Ranch. They're pretty good.

http://www.flyingbeeranch.net

Aqualab
11-04-2012, 09:34 AM
Thanks THawk - can never have too many forum member recommended sources of honey!

On a side note, the clover honey I ordered from Fruitwood Orchards in NJ showed up yesterday. Hopefully that means they did not get hit too bad from the storm. Honey looks great, I like the 1 gal see-through jars vs the white plastic tubs some other providers use. Just a preference. So now I can start my new 12 gal batch today with the 30 lbs from them. Going with the Lalvin EC 1118 dry yeast for this batch - assuming 3 packets for this size run.

The other 35 lbs of clover I impatiently ordered from the webstaurant store will arrive sometime this coming week - honey overload! Is there a best way to store honey? Will have to wait until the first 12-gal batch is ready to bottle before I can start the second one. Second batch I'm going with the Lalvin K1V 1116.

Anybody ever use: Super Kleer 2 Part Wine Finings to clarify their mead?
Not sure exactly when to add to the must?

fatbloke
11-04-2012, 02:10 PM
No need to worry much about honey storage (especially in the suppliers container). If it lasts 3 millennia buried in the heat of the Egyptian deserts, then I'm confident it's gonna be fine stored at your place......

As for the finings, not used that particular one, but the similar 2 part one thats available here works well. You just make sure that the ferment is finisfhed with 3 consecutive gravity readings, each one taken a couple or three days apart. If the gravity stays the same, then its ready.

You just rack it off the gross lees, de-gas, then follow the instructions. It should be clear a couple of days later.

As a side point, if you have an appropriate container, the batch is best aged in bulk, as it makes for a consistent bottling, when its ready, but of course you can bottle the finished product. If you vary the size of the bottles, and then you just taste the smallest quantity as a quality control to judge when its ready to drink (or of it needs a little something - like acid or back sweetening, etc).

THawk
11-04-2012, 07:13 PM
you just taste the smallest quantity as a quality control to judge when its ready to drink (or of it needs a little something - like acid or back sweetening, etc).

Well, the QC taste need not be a small quantity, you know... ;D

Chevette Girl
11-05-2012, 12:13 AM
Honey looks great, I like the 1 gal see-through jars vs the white plastic tubs some other providers use.

1 gallon jars are GREAT for doing JAO's and variants... Just sayin'... :)