PDA

View Full Version : Fermentation Temp ???



RIC0
11-05-2012, 05:51 PM
So what is the ideal temp for fermentation???

I've done some searching and googling and didn't find much.

My brew seller is holding pretty strong at 66 degrees.

kudapucat
11-05-2012, 05:58 PM
It depends on the yeast. Most yeasts state it's working range on the packet.
Lalvin are the best for documentation on their yeast.
I would never brew any yeast over 20C
Which is 68F in the silly system, if my maths is good.

RIC0
11-05-2012, 07:46 PM
It depends on the yeast. Most yeasts state it's working range on the packet.
Lalvin are the best for documentation on their yeast.
I would never brew any yeast over 20C
Which is 68F in the silly system, if my maths is good.

67 - 69 is what the temp is were it's stored so I think i'm good.

I went to the lalvin website too research and it appears my first batch is were it needs to be.

akueck
11-05-2012, 09:38 PM
If you have the means to do it, try the same batch made at 60 F and 68 F. You should see quite a difference!

Intheswamp
11-05-2012, 11:03 PM
akueck, what difference would we see by fermenting at the two different temperatures?

The temperature in my fermenting area appears to be 66F to 72F degrees (for the current time of late autumn). Would arranging to have a short period of the fermentation be at lower temperatures have a positive effect? Would 2,3,4... days make a difference and if it would would the cool temps be better at the beginning of primary fermentation...ending of primary....etc.,? If this would work it seems like at the beginning and ending that the yeast would be weakest and possibly struggling....so maybe the middle part of primary fermentation would be a good time so the yeast can just kind of "lope" along? Worth it?

Thanks,
Ed

This article, Wine making and Fermentation temperature (http://www.thewinepages.org.uk/fermentation-temperature-wine-making.htm), definitely points to a lower fermentation temperature...even down to a 50F/10C one for the primary. Interesting. ;)

Hmm, but that article is about wine...not mead. ?

RIC0
11-06-2012, 07:23 AM
Looking at the lalvin website it appears most of their yeast all need 60 - 80 temps but from what I've read the lower 70's seems to be optimum and the yeaast that I used 1118 has a fast fermentation. I was expecting to see the airlock working like crazy but that is not the case. It's been 2 days and it's pretty non active.

It did foam up a little, nothing crazy or a lot to be honest, it does smell good and I don't think anything is wrong I was just expecting it to do like the batch of beer i have going.

It's been bubbling for 8 days.

kudapucat
11-06-2012, 08:00 AM
Should she bubble, she be fine. Be patient. A hot fast 1118 is not so tasty IMHO.

Chevette Girl
11-06-2012, 12:42 PM
what difference would we see by fermenting at the two different temperatures?

*grin* That's why you should try it. D-47 does icky things when it's too hot, K1V apparently gets all estery when kept cool but doesn't do anything horrible when too hot. It will illustrate precisely why temperature can matter. The only way someone with a palate like mine (ie, not too sophisticated!) is going to really notice the differences is to taste it side by side to compare.

It may also illustrate for you the difference between a quick warm ferment and a more leisurely cooler ferment. Most of the time, the cooler ferment will be pleasant to drink a lot sooner because you don't have to wait for some of the harsh alcohols to mellow out.

Intheswamp
11-06-2012, 12:59 PM
Living down here in the south we can have some sweltering summer temperatures. Summer temperatures in the house are usually around 73F courtesy of the geo-thermal system. Inside temperatures in the winter normally run from 65-71F.

Fermentation outside can easily be exposed to a 20-30F degree swing (or more) in daytime/nighttime temperatures so outside isn't good. Ah well, the JAO seems to be working though it's down to less than a couple of bubbles per minute now.

The first order I placed I ordered some D47, but then later learned about fusels and D47's dislike of warm temperatures. Looks like I need to concentrate on yeasts that are more friendly with warmer temperatures.

Ed

Chevette Girl
11-06-2012, 01:00 PM
I don't have AC so I only use D47 in the winter myself. K1V seems to be about the most versatile for my purposes but I've also had good luck with EC-1118, 71B and RC-212.

RIC0
11-06-2012, 02:22 PM
For what it's worth I moved the gallon jug from a room that was 65ish to a room that is 70ish and the yeasties are going nuts and the airlock is much more active.

kudapucat
11-06-2012, 04:06 PM
This is unsurprising, but not always good. Yeast can live outside its tolerance temps, but it usually makes nasty tastes or smells.
Not saying there's anything wrong here (I haven't the time to calculate your temperature in sensible units this morning) just make sure your yeast is happy.

Chevette Girl
11-06-2012, 10:55 PM
*snicker* sensible units...

Ahem.

That should be fine for that yeast, but one of the common complaints about EC-1118 is that it ferments so fast that it blows a lot of the delicate aromas and flavours right out the airlock so you might actually want to keep this one slow by decreasing the temperature... faster isn't ALWAYS better, no matter what you were told ;D

celticgladiator
11-06-2012, 11:49 PM
*snicker* sensible units...

Ahem.

That should be fine for that yeast, but one of the common complaints about EC-1118 is that it ferments so fast that it blows a lot of the delicate aromas and flavours right out the airlock so you might actually want to keep this one slow by decreasing the temperature... faster isn't ALWAYS better, no matter what you were told ;D

Hehe my mind is taking that way wrong lol