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CRaymond36
01-15-2013, 08:11 PM
Hello,
I just brewed the 3 week sweet mead recipe from the site.

address is here: http://www.gotmead.com/index.php?option=com_rapidrecipe&page=viewrecipe&recipe_id=119&Itemid=459

summary:
I made a 5 gallon batch
-Buckwheat and clover honey
-K1V-1116 yeast
-used energizer and nutrients
-oxygenated each day after pitching for 3 days
-starting gravity 1.11

The recipe says to ferment for about 2 weeks and stop the fermentation when the gravity reaches 1.02 by racking it onto potassium metabisulfite and potassium sorbate, then waiting a week for it to clear.

My batch didn't reach 1.02 until after week 3. Tasted good at that point, no off flavors or anything. In the morning, I racked it into an idophor sanitized bucket containing the sulfite and sorbate, minus the lees from the previous bucket.

That afternoon, The mead was still fermenting, and I noticed a rotten egg smell when smelling the airlock. I opened the lid, and was hit with a mass of sulfur, which in turn encompassed the entire living room and kitchen nearby. In a panic, I hit google and the results said that the sulfur smell was probably from the yeast being stressed, and temporary. They also said that I should aerate the must again, and add nutrients, in an attempt to stop the yeast from making more sulfur.

I did just that, and after 2 days the sulfur smell died down a little, but the mead was still fermenting at full blast. I stuck the entire bucket in the fridge to try and cold crash the mead, which worked. But when I bring it back to room temperature, it starts fermenting again. And, the mead still has a slight aroma of sulfur, with a slight taste of sulfur as well. I bottled it, tried adding a clove and some cinnamon/allspice/nutmeg to one of the bottles. The next day, the spiced one tasted better, but the sulfur smell/taste still lingers.


My Questions are:

1. What exactly caused the sulfur reaction, is it a normal occurrence when using the sulfite/sorbate tactic in this recipe?
2. Is the sulfur smell/taste temporary, or is there anything I can do to get rid of it?
3. I would like to use this recipe again, is there anything that I did wrong or anything I can do to stop the sulfuric experience that I just went through?
4. Is there a better way to stop the fermentation? preferably one that doesnt require to store the mead in the fridge permanently without fear of the fermentation to start again?

Medsen Fey
01-15-2013, 08:21 PM
Before addressing anything else, am I understanding correctly that you bottled this while the fermentation is active? If so, did you check the gravity? That yeast can produce in excess of 120 psi and can potentially explode even a Champagne bottle. You may want to unbottle it unless you used plastic bottles.

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CRaymond36
01-15-2013, 08:30 PM
I put the entire 6.5 gallon plastic fermentation bucket into the fridge(we have a spare) for about 3 days, which stopped the fermentation. I then racked it into another bucket, minus the lees. It was pretty clear in the new bucket, but it seemed like it was still fermenting in the new bucket.

After I bottled it, I put all the bottles back into the fridge, and they have been sitting there for a couple days now with no issues. I will be one of the bottles out tonight and sticking it outside under my deck for a couple days to safely see if it turns into a bottle bomb or not, lol. I'm willing to sacrifice a bottle to do this. However, i'm going to keep the rest of the bottles in the fridge just to be safe.

Medsen Fey
01-15-2013, 10:15 PM
The performance of one bottle will not predict the behavior of the others. All you need is to have one start up again to have an injury, and the chances of the yeast waking up if this warms up into the 80's is high.

You would be wise to pour all these bottles back into the carboy with a good splashing to get rid of some of the sulfur. Then treat it with some yeast hulls and let it warm up and finish fermenting. At higher temp more of the H2S will blow off along with the CO2. When the fermentation is finished as evidenced by a stable gravity, splash rack it again. If it still smells like sulfur, you can treat by stirring with a copper tube or scrub pad (don't do that with actively fermenting yeast or you'll get more H2S). After you clear the odor, you can restabilize and sweeten it back up to taste.

If you bottle with sulfur odors, over time the H2S will form mercaptans and disulfides and though these compounds may not be quite as stinky they are much more difficult to eliminate. Bottling a stinky mead that isn't completely clear will give a lot of yeast sediment in the bottles that will likely create more H2S.

And no, H2S isn't a common occurrence with this recipe but it can happen, and stopping an active fermentation with sorbate and sulfite is prone to fail. A better way to stop the fermentation is to put it in a fridge for a couple of weeks and then racking and adding sorbate and sulfite when the yeast are dormant (and mostly gone). This is called "cold crashing."

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CRaymond36
01-15-2013, 10:57 PM
I saw the tip about stirring with a copper tube. I'll save the 2 bottles that I have spiced and do as you said with the rest, pour back into the fermenter to finish off and the rest.

I'm wondering though, would this recipe normally stop around 1.02 gravity on its own, or would you have to stop it manually somehow?

The recipe says that it should be done in 3 weeks, but when my batch hit 1.02 gravity after the third week, the airlock was still burping about every 15 seconds or so. And if not, how long would you say it would take the yeast in this recipe to tap out?

I wanted to use this recipe just for what it stated. A quick 1 month recipe to play around with to get a lot of experience making mead with while I am brewing stronger stuff in other carboys that take longer to finish.

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fatbloke
01-16-2013, 01:24 AM
Manually stopping a ferment is quite hard, especially if you used K1v1116 which is one of the most robust yeasts available and WILL ferment to 18% ABV.

CRaymond36
01-16-2013, 07:03 AM
I guess ill have to try the recipe again and test the length of time it takes the yeast to tap out instead of attempting to stop early. But this time Ill stick with a 1 gallon batch. I'll post my results in the recipe's comments so others can learn from my mistakes, lol.

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Medsen Fey
01-16-2013, 07:10 AM
I'm wondering though, would this recipe normally stop around 1.02 gravity on its own, or would you have to stop it manually somehow?


With K1V, this recipe won't stop at 1.020 on its own. You have to intervene to stop it. Unfortunately yeast are very unpredictable, but this batch is giving you a lot of experience. :o

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CRaymond36
01-16-2013, 11:55 AM
You aren't kidding there. Lots of hardships, but still fun learning the ropes. Trying to muster up the courage and experience to attempt a Vikings Blod clone. Brew using hops and hibiscus, target of 22% abv to be able to backsweeten it down to 19%. From what i've been reading, sounds like one of the hardest/tedious things to make with all the steps involved.

Chevette Girl
01-24-2013, 09:53 PM
A note about fermentation starting up again after raising the temp again after cold-crashing, check that the SG is changing, sometimes it LOOKS like bubbling has renewed but it's just trapped CO2 coming out because cold must can hold more dissolved gas than warm must. I learned that one when I moved my musts from cold basement to warm kitchen...

And it is possible that trying to stop the yeast may be stressing them out and making them stinky, I've never tried to stop a fermentation before though :)

Hope it turns out well!

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 11:55 AM
I decided to just dump the batch and start over. Since i'm still a newbee, I think it would be better for me to learn from the mistake and start from scratch on that batch, do it the normal way instead of the "quick way". I have plenty of buckwheat left over, so we'll see how it goes.

ox45
01-25-2013, 01:12 PM
I just bottled my first batch of this exact same quick mead. I split mine off into two batches letting one go till dryness, and stopping one at 1.020. I tried the same thing by just racking it off the lees and onto the chems. I learned the same way (minus the sulfur) that K1V-1116 is a fickle little bugger. I had to cold crash mine in the fridge for a few days (didn't take weeks) to really drop most of the yeast out. I then re-racked onto a little more potassium metabisulfite and let sit for a few days taking SG readings daily and letting it clear. Once I was satisfied that fermentation was in fact done, I bottled it up.

This was my first batch as well, and I also learned quite a bit. Once common thing, which should be changed in the recipe imo, is that this recipe requires a cold crash before racking onto the chems to stop at 1.020. This strain of yeast is just too hard to stop when it's chugging full steam ahead like that.

BTW, the one I let run dry wound up stopping at 1.001. It probably would have gone a little more over a few weeks time, but I stabilized there and bottled.

Chevette Girl
01-25-2013, 01:25 PM
I decided to just dump the batch and start over.

Dude!! Just because it didn't do exactly what you wanted doesn't mean you need to dump it! It's rare that any batch is beyond saving... the advantage is you get to learn all kinds of new things with a misbehaving batch, the worst possible scenario is you really mess something up and have to pitch it anyway, but at least you learned some tricks to avoid losing your investment (time and ingredients) the next time... but even then, a little age can really fix a lot of problems... You could have let it go as dry as it wanted to go and then have a taste... then sulphite it again and backsweeten it to 1.020 if the taste is too dry for you... that's what I'd have done, anyway.

psychopomp23
01-25-2013, 01:48 PM
Dude!! Just because it didn't do exactly what you wanted doesn't mean you need to dump it! It's rare that any batch is beyond saving... the advantage is you get to learn all kinds of new things with a misbehaving batch, the worst possible scenario is you really mess something up and have to pitch it anyway, but at least you learned some tricks to avoid losing your investment

Yeah look at me. I have a batch that i started November 17th, put wayyyy to much potassium metabisulfite by mistake and the fermentation never started going :( But i was told to be patient and wait and HOPEFULY when i start to repitch next week-end everything will be allright *keep fingers cross* I learned a lot from that batch

Marshmallow Blue
01-25-2013, 01:59 PM
Gotta go with the group, never dump... unless you have 201 gallons brewing and the beverage control guys are banging on your door. Then you can dump 1 gallon... Just one. I've told this story before and I'll tell it again. My apple cider mead was almost a gallon of apple cider vinegar and I was about to give it to vinegar lovers as such. But my friend told me to stick in the fight and see what happens. Its now some good apple cider mead, and I won't be putting it on my cabbage any time soon... Not that I eat cabbage.

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 02:19 PM
Hmm, ok. You guys convinced me, i'll give it another go at fixing, lol. I'll keep this thread updated on the progress.

Ox45, Thanks for the info! Great to hear the experiences of someone else who attempted this recipe. How did both versions come out in the end? I'm really wondering if this recipe turns out to be enjoyable enough to do as it says, "Drink while you wait for others to finish".

smertz001
01-25-2013, 02:44 PM
I just drank my first bottle of this, a couple nights ago (started on 2012-11-17, bottled 2012-12-12) and it was very tasty! I didn't get a chance until now to try it, so don't know if the extra month helped it at all, but yes. When I'm in between beers and meads and need something quick and tasty, this could very well be my go to recipe. I did it as the recipe stands in the one gallon batch.

I never had a problem with off smells or anything though, it was very straight forward for me.

Chevette Girl
01-25-2013, 02:55 PM
Yeast are finicky creatures... sometimes they won't go near their tolerance no matter what you do to them, sometimes they blow right past it, no matter what you do to them.

I have one batch (3 gallons of highbush cranberry) that turned out so bitter you'd spit it out for the first three years... but it smelled so nice (and I worked so hard picking all those little $@$#!!@ berries) that I couldn't bear to dump it... now at six or seven years old, the tannic bitterness has finally dropped out enough that I'm glad I didn't toss it, in a few more years the taste may actually match the smell! And I've had a few finished batches do weird things here and there, most notably, diesel aroma (which can be aerated out), rubber stopper (haven't figured out how to fix that one yet), and a few weird things go on during fermentation from stressed yeast, including sulphur odour and most startling, vomit flavour... but so far all of the sulphury and vomit-like musts have eventually smartened up and made me proud.

Personally though, my go-to mead for quick drinking is the 8 week Joe's Ancient Orange (and some variations), I have several 1-gal jars on the go and as soon as I bottle one, I generally start another, they're the ones that go fastest at parties and the ones I'm most likely to grab if I just feel like a glass of something tasty, since I have not found that partially-full bottles of JAO oxidize or spoil, even after being left for months....

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 02:57 PM
I did it as the recipe stands in the one gallon batch.

Did you do as it said, which was to simply rack it onto the 2 chems when is was at 1.02 in order to stop the fermentation? If so, that makes me wonder even more if I did something in particular to piss off the yeast to make the sulphur.

Also, did you cold crash it before racking?

Chevette Girl
01-25-2013, 03:05 PM
It could be anything, really. Yeast = finicky. That, and adding sulphites IS sulphur... sometimes I get a bit of rotten egg smell from campden tablets but it dissippates over a few days.

Splashing as Medsen suggests usually does the trick for sulphur

I usually get airlock activity for a couple days after I stabilise anything even if it's been still for months, so always go by SG to determine whether it's really fermenting or just has gas ;D... speaking of which, what is your SG at now?

smertz001
01-25-2013, 03:05 PM
I may give the JOA a try once I get one of these other three I have going currently out of the jugs, since I'm out of ... jugs! (=

I will have to check my notes when I get home. But I did rack on to the two chemicals, and then I did cold crash it. My one glitch was with the chemicals, I didn't grind up the little sprinkle ones, and so they probably took a bit longer to work.

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 03:06 PM
Personally though, my go-to mead for quick drinking is the 8 week Joe's Ancient Orange

I completely agree. My first mead was the JAOM, like so many others. I took it with me to two small parties, and it was a complete hit! Everyone loved it, and I enjoy it as well. I'll be dedicating a 1gal carboy just like you.

I was surprised on how strong it got, ABV wise. I didn't check the OG, so I dont know the ABV it reached, and boy I wish I did. Two glasses of that batch and my friend and I were well beyond tipsy.

You said you tried variations to it. I was thinking about experimenting with it myself to figure out what other fruits I can substitute the oranges for and at what amounts. What were your findings?

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 03:12 PM
what is your SG at now?

Well, after the issue with the sulfur, I added more nutrients and aerated it for a couple days, which got "most" (not all) of the smell and taste out of it. Then I cold crashed for a week, racked it, bottled it, and threw the bottles into the fridge. They've been sitting there for about 2 weeks now. Before I bottled, it was just a hair below 1.02.

I had 10 1/2 bottles worth, and I added some spices to the half bottle. That masked the sulfur a bit, but it still didn't taste all that great.

Chevette Girl
01-25-2013, 03:32 PM
I completely agree. My first mead was the JAOM, like so many others. I took it with me to two small parties, and it was a complete hit! Everyone loved it, and I enjoy it as well. I'll be dedicating a 1gal carboy just like you.

I was surprised on how strong it got, ABV wise. I didn't check the OG, so I dont know the ABV it reached, and boy I wish I did. Two glasses of that batch and my friend and I were well beyond tipsy.

You said you tried variations to it. I was thinking about experimenting with it myself to figure out what other fruits I can substitute the oranges for and at what amounts. What were your findings?

Mine usually start around 1.125 and stop around 1.025, give or take, so even if I don't check them, I assume they're somewhere between ten and twelve percent... I've tried substituting different citrus fruits for the orange: lemon and tangelo and blood orange are awesome, grapefruit wasn't as good as I'd hoped, and the one where I used several citrus fruits didn't clear properly... and I don't ever include the pith anymore, gives me heartburn, so I only use the zest and the fruit or juice. I've tried using different things instead of raisins, the lemon-date one was nice although do make sure the zest gets included or it's too sweet, dried cranberries get totally lost in the flavour even if you leave out the cinnamon stick, even a pound of fresh cranberries gets pretty lost with the oranges... I've also tried non-citrus fruits and the short synopsis is, 12 ounces of blackberries = big win, less than 1 lb strawberries = meh and unripe apples = bleah. You can also play with the spicing, lemon is good with or without the cinnamon stick, you can try allspice and nutmeg, vary the amount of clove, I keep forgetting to try adding cardamon but it's on the to-do list... It's sort of a fine dance of making sure you've got a little bit of something bitter and enough acidity to balance out all that residual sweetness, I did not find that dropping 1/4 lb of honey from the JAO recipe was a good idea, nor is using something other than bread yeast. Try a thread search on "JAO variation" or "JAO variant" (do use the quotes or it won't recognize JAO as a word, it doesn't like three-letter words), I know there is one thread dedicated solely to JAO variations somewhere on here and variations are mentioned in a bunch of other threads.

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 03:45 PM
Awesome info on the JAOM, thanks! I already have 4 meads planned to start this weekend, and a blueberry/blackberry mead is one of them. So i'll probably try the blueberry JAOM after this round of batches. Sad to hear the strawberry one didn't work out, that is one of my favorite fruits and really want to find a way to turn it into a great mead, but all the research i've done has been a bit negative about strawberries in mead.

Marshmallow Blue
01-25-2013, 04:04 PM
Awesome info on the JAOM, thanks! I already have 4 meads planned to start this weekend, and a blueberry/blackberry mead is one of them. So i'll probably try the blueberry JAOM after this round of batches. Sad to hear the strawberry one didn't work out, that is one of my favorite fruits and really want to find a way to turn it into a great mead, but all the research i've done has been a bit negative about strawberries in mead.

I've got a few meads planned in the near future. I would think about staggering the start dates (maybe one a month or every other week) so later down the road you can have a steady stream of finished mead going into your mouth or storage area. And if anything goes wrong with a batch, you won't have as great a possibility of having 4 stuck/slow fermentations to deal with all at once.

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 04:20 PM
I would think about staggering the start dates

That's the ultimate plan. Since i'm still a bit new to the whole thing, i'm attempting the shotgun method of learning, lol. I'm a weird one where i'll do hours upon hours of research on new things, and this is no exception. So with everything i've learned so far, I am eager to put into practice.

After this batch of 4, my plans are to stagger 3 1 gallon carboys about a month apart, dedicate 1 carboy to nothing but JAOM, and then the 5 gallon will go towards the meads I like best from the 1gal batches.

I also see the strong possibility of expanding even more, maybe picking up 3 more 1 gal carboys to get a total of 7, 1 for JAOM and 6 to stagger every 2 months.

I have been toying with an idea though. My work has a lot of used water dispenser bottles, look like they are well over 5 gallons. If I could find a stopper/airlock to fit, I could have dozens of free 5+ gallon jugs from that, and then the only thing holding me back is the cost of ingredients and storage space, lol.

fatbloke
01-25-2013, 04:29 PM
As long as the water cooler bottles are made of P.E.T. - polyethyleneterathelate they'll be fine. In fact if they have the industry standard replaceable tear off caps then better bottle air lock stoppers fit them......

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 04:31 PM
Indeed they do have the ripoff caps. The receptacle punctures the cap when you install the bottle, and then you rip off the cap like a gallon milk cap when the bottle is empty.

Marshmallow Blue
01-25-2013, 04:57 PM
As long as the water cooler bottles are made of P.E.T. - polyethyleneterathelate they'll be fine. In fact if they have the industry standard replaceable tear off caps then better bottle air lock stoppers fit them......

I also think that better bottles fit a #10 rubber stopper so maybe your water jugs fit #10s

Chevette Girl
01-25-2013, 05:22 PM
For blueberry JAO, check out Thawk's brewlogs, it's the one thing I haven't tried in a JAO. Dingurth (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20660)recently did a successful JAO attempt with strawberries and so did Cal (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20831), you just need to use more than 1 lb, which I didn't. Strawberry works quite well in a mead, in the Patron's area is a legendary recipe called Yo's Strawberry Pizzaz... and last year I step-fed some excess strawberry wine with honey and it was pretty good.

Cost of ingredients and storage space... welcome to meadmaking :rolleyes:

CRaymond36
01-25-2013, 06:18 PM
Sorry, I originally meant that I was going to try the blackberries as you suggested.

I'll probably be using the Oregon Fruit Puree, since fresh berries are out of season and that the puree should provide more consistent results. You think 12 ounces of the more dense puree would be too much, or cut back to 10 ounces or so?

Chevette Girl
01-25-2013, 08:19 PM
...all my blackberries come from Mexico so I've only ever used fresh (or frozen by me when they're on sale and I don't have carboy space), two of the little 6-oz plastic containers is what I use. I don't know if Oregon Fruit concentrates their purée in any way or if it's just crushed fruit, if it is indeed just crushed fruit, then 12 ounces is 12 ounces...

smertz001
01-25-2013, 09:49 PM
As it seems, I racked it based on days, not on gravity readings...

My complete notes (copied out of excel so please excuse the formatting.)

11/17/12 Start Started the mead today. Followed the directions pretty close. Not sure what the temperature of the must was when I pitched the yeast because the thermometer broke while I was cooling it down to below 90F. But aside from that everything went on as planned in the directions. It's currently in the primary fermentor (2gallon bucket) and will be moved over to the glass carboy next Sunday. Also, not compeltely sure how much water I used since I didn't use the whole gallon, and didn't measure out how much I added after mixing the first quart with the honey. I need to get better at that.

11/17/12 Gravity 1.100

11/18/12 Observation It's in the bucket. And the airlock isn't really moving around at all. I may peak at it tomorrow or Tuesday.

11/19/12 Mix I shook up the bucket today pretty good since I still didn't see any bubbles in the airlock. Shook it so well that mead came out of the air lock and I had to clean it. So will see what happens…

11/19/12 Observation After the shaking it started to bubble pretty good! Very glad to see that!

11/22/12 Mix I shook up the bucket pretty good today, too good, as some of the mead started to come through the air lock. So I took it out, and decided to do a gravity reading and a little taste. It tastes quite good! It has a bit of a yeast flavour, but that's from shaking it up. And the Buckwheat honey is coming through nicely, I do believe I will be racking it on Sunday after we get back from a trip!

11/22/12 Gravity 1.071

11/25/12 Racked I racked the mead into a gallon carboy today. Also took a gravity reading and tasted (and drank it.) The mead is very sweet and tasty right now! I would not mind drinking it as is! But I will hold off and rack it again next week with the yeast killing, and then in another week into bottles I believe. It's pretty much on par with what the original recipe says for gravity and tastings right now. Looking forward to the end product and seeing where it ends up!

11/25/12 Gravity 1.055

12/1/12 Observation Racked the mead into a new carboy with the Potassium Metabisulfite and Potassium Sorbate. Gave the mead a little taste test, a bit dryer than it was last week, but still pretty tasty. Will be bottling the mead soon! I need to get some bottles to do so though!

12/1/12 Gravity 1.034

12/10/12 Move Moved into the spare fridge to try to cold crash it. It wasn't getting any clear and still had tiny bubbles.

12/11/12 Observation Checked in on it, and it's clearing now. It's quite dark still, but you can see through it. Probably another day of this, then I will rack it, and put it back in the fridge and then rack again the day after, ready to bottle.

12/12/12 Bottled Well, it was crystal clear and so it got bottled! I'm thinking it may be best to keep these guys refridgerated just in cases. But they should be good to go! And it tastes yummy!

12/12/12 Gravity 1.026

CRaymond36
01-26-2013, 12:25 PM
Awesome Smertz, thanks for posting your log. That helps alot.

CG, Oregon Fruit's puree is seeded and pitted, and they dont use any preservatives, chemicals, or other additives, just straight fruit with no seeds, so its supposedly good for brewing.

On the FAQs section of their website, they state:


A: Our puree is 100% fruit. We remove the seeds and pits from the puree and aseptically pack the puree in 42 lb. bag/box. The seeds make up 12% of the whole berry by weight and pits make up 20% of the fruit weight. If you use 100 lbs. of fruit, the equivalent amount of puree is 88 lbs. (100 lbs. less 12 lbs. of seeds equals 88 lbs.)

However, that sounds a bit too generalized for me, but it may just be me and my fanatical engineering mindset when it comes to numbers, heh.

I'll probably just go with the full 12 ounces. With the JAOv, i'm guessing more fruit flavor wouldn't hurt it too much.

Chevette Girl
01-26-2013, 02:59 PM
CG, Oregon Fruit's puree is seeded and pitted, and they dont use any preservatives, chemicals, or other additives, just straight fruit with no seeds, so its supposedly good for brewing.

I'll probably just go with the full 12 ounces. With the JAOv, i'm guessing more fruit flavor wouldn't hurt it too much.

Seed-free purée will make a difference, but hey, adding an extra mass of fruit equal to the amount of seeds in 12 ounces (by weight) of blackberries probably won't hurt at all. Just a reminder, my 12 ounces is weight, not volume... silly archaic measuring conventions :p

CRaymond36
01-28-2013, 03:50 PM
OK,
I just had another sulfur incident when starting the black/blue berry melomel. I did a little research, and also rechecked this string to see if the answer matched up as well, but the question wasn't officially answered in the string.

After the research, multiple sources said that too little, and also too much, DAP/Nitrogen can cause the yeast to produce sulfur, and different yeasts have different sulfur producing attributes as well as Nitrogen requirements.

So, to ask the question/s bluntly. What is the root cause of the sulfur production? Is it definitely tied to the Nitrogen content?

Chevette Girl
02-03-2013, 03:57 PM
My blatantly unsubstantiated suspicion is that you're never going to peg it definitively to a single variable. I could be wrong but I suspect pH can also be a reason for yeast to make stink, and leaving a must on the gross lees can do it too from whatever compounds are released as the fruit bits break down.

CRaymond36
02-03-2013, 07:04 PM
Pointed in the right direction by medsen, I hit the interwebs and learned a lot of good info, completely changing my views and techniques on brewing. /Ty medsen.

Learned how to prevent so2 and what to do when it rears it's ugly head. :)

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