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columbiacritter
02-26-2013, 10:54 PM
A straight dry mead
10lbs medium dark wildflower honey
4 gallons water
1 tsp nutrient
d47 yeast, I think


sat in fermenter carboy for 1 month.
racked to secondary for 2 months. was very clear.
read at 1.0 when bottled.
now after 3 months in a 55 degree basement there is a haze in the bottom 2" of every bottle. :confused:

Do I have bottle bombs ready to blow or do I just need to let it sit? :eek:

Riverat
02-26-2013, 11:09 PM
Maybe just sediment, carefully open a bottle and see if it's carb'd or petulant (slightly fizzy) and do a sanity check on the gravity while you are at it.
If no fizz and no change in gravity it's just dropping debris, my limited experience tells me that a "very clear" mead can still drop a remarkable amout of stuff. If you can spare the carboy and space I'd suggest several months to a year of aging for future batches, if not to get it where you want it, at least to drop everything out, us really lazy types can make benign neglect into an art form! LOL

columbiacritter
02-26-2013, 11:48 PM
Carefully opened a bottle, no fizz, checked another that was in a mason jar and the lid isn't popped up. So I will just give it time. I told everyone it wouldn't be drinkable until next Thanksgiving anyway. Thanks for the reassurance.

skunkboy
02-27-2013, 12:03 AM
Yeah, a lot of my early bottles, no nutrient and other issues, dropped a lot lees but did not continue to carbonate... your millage may vary... :)

The_Bishop
02-27-2013, 09:52 AM
This happened to me with my first traditional. It annoyed me so much that I bought a wine filter that I use on all my 5 gallon batches before bottling.

PitBull
02-28-2013, 08:54 AM
This happened to me with my first traditional. It annoyed me so much that I bought a wine filter that I use on all my 5 gallon batches before bottling.
Even filtered wine can drop sediment. I have a buckwheat traditional which was bulk aged for 8 months, then clarified with Sparkolloid for 4 weeks, and finally filtered through a 0.5 micron (nominal) filter before bottling.

It remained crystal clear for about 18 months but now has some dropped some sediment in the last 6 months. I recently found this article: Using Fining Agents: Techniques (http://www.winemakermag.com/stories/article/indices/12-clarityfiltration/715-using-fining-agents-techniques) that recommends fining 3 to 6 months when using Sparkolloid.:eek:

Chevette Girl
03-01-2013, 01:45 PM
This happened to me with my first traditional. It annoyed me so much that I bought a wine filter that I use on all my 5 gallon batches before bottling.

Happens to me now and then, but my wine filter's such a pain to use and I do so many 1-gal batches where it's really not worth getting the filter set up that I just got used to the sediment. :p

Wolfie
03-01-2013, 02:31 PM
hey as a fun side note, D47 is supposed to be good for on the lees aging. You've got sur lie in the bottle, maybe you should give each bottle a shake every month or so.

/Z

Wolfie
03-01-2013, 02:33 PM
Come to think of it, that could be fun-- I'd even keep "cloudy bottoms" as the name to draw attention to the sur lie character. If you dont take it, I will ;)

/Z

TheAlchemist
03-02-2013, 05:38 PM
hey as a fun side note, D47 is supposed to be good for on the lees aging. You've got sur lie in the bottle, maybe you should give each bottle a shake every month or so.

/Z

I thought D47 was NOT good for sur lees aging...I could be mistaken...looking for feedback from the more experienced Mazers.

Medsen Fey
03-02-2013, 05:59 PM
D47 is excellent for lees aging.

Filtration alone is not the answer. The protein chains and yeast cells (or parts) that can cause sediment can make it through even sterile filtration. Ultrafiltration is required.

Fining and protein stabilization will greatly reduce the problem. On the other hand, the sediment is harmless and may be nutritious. so as long as you decant or pour carefully it is no big deal.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

Marc F.
03-03-2013, 03:39 PM
Fining and protein stabilization will greatly reduce the problem.

Can you (or anybody else who knows) explain how and with what to do this?

I've gotten 6 little pots of chemicals with my wine kit and I don't know what they are for. (I don't need them atm, because I'm making JAO)

Chevette Girl
03-03-2013, 03:47 PM
It's right in the Newbee Guide under troubleshooting,

"“How do I get the Mead to clear?” – The first thing to do, if you can, is to cold crash the Mead. This means putting it into a cold environment (around 38ºF) for a week. This usually drops it clear. If this does not work, or you cannot do this, then the next easiest thing to do is to use a Fining agent such as Polyclar, Bentonite, or Sparkolloid. Rack off of the Lees and let the Mead settle for a few weeks after clearing to make sure everything drops out before bottling. If each of these still fail, including a combination of them, then you can purchase a filter system and use a 0.5 micron filter to scrub all matter out of the Mead."

There are bunch of other fining agents that work too, like chitosan and kieselsol, but I usually start with bentonite and if that doesn't do the trick, follow up with sparkolloid, I've only had one batch that this one-two punch didn't work on. Another possible source of cloudiness could be pectic haze if you used fruits (especially if they were heat processed in any way) and didn't use pectic enzyme.

Let us know what your pots of chemicals are and maybe we can tell you what they're for.