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jgoehring
05-04-2013, 01:00 AM
Potassium or Sodium? As I understand it both pretty much do the same thing with the exception of Sodium releasing more SO 2 gasses. I currently do not have a means to take a Free SO 2 reading. So would it be safer just to stick with the Potassium?

fatbloke
05-04-2013, 04:58 AM
Potassium or Sodium? As I understand it both pretty much do the same thing with the exception of Sodium releasing more SO 2 gasses. I currently do not have a means to take a Free SO 2 reading. So would it be safer just to stick with the Potassium?
Well as far as I can work out, it's mostly a regional thing, though why that should be is beyond what I can find out.

Generally, it seems that in the US/Canada area, it's Kmeta that's available easily. Here, it's Nameta, and while I can track down Kmeta, it's generally about 4 times the price.

That said, being where I'm located, there is a good proportion of the UK wine industry located around this area, is it would appear that the local wineries use Kmeta too, but they will source it from the commercial winery supply places.

There's another point too, that if you over do it with Nameta, you can end up with a metallic, almost salty kind of taste, whereas this is much less of an issue with the Kmeta.

So with that in mind, just stick with using the (most likely) more easily available Kmeta you can get.

Doesn't matter whether it's in the form of Campden tablets or as Kmeta powder.......

Medsen Fey
05-04-2013, 07:20 PM
If you are using it to make a bucket of sanitizer, sodium meta is great (and cheaper).

For adding to you mead or wine, using potassium meta is a better option.

jgoehring
05-05-2013, 12:09 AM
Thanks for the info. I am trying to back sweeten Joe's grape pyment a little bit. The gravity has not changed. I just wanted to be sure when adding the buckwheat which I left out of the original recipe.

fatbloke
05-05-2013, 04:57 AM
Thanks for the info. I am trying to back sweeten Joe's grape pyment a little bit. The gravity has not changed. I just wanted to be sure when adding the buckwheat which I left out of the original recipe.
If its the recipe made with EC-1118 then make sure you sulphite it and then follow that with sorbate......unless its your intention to allow for re fermentation.

jgoehring
05-05-2013, 10:34 AM
That was the plan. I definitely do not want a restarted fermentation. This batch went really dry. I know it will get better with age and it has already after a month. But it could use some more honey characteristics. The 1118 ate right through the sugars real quick. I don't know if this is normal. It only took 9 days in the primary.

Chevette Girl
05-14-2013, 10:43 PM
EC-1118 is a pretty robust yeast and it's not uncommon for it to tear through a fermentation in a week or less... some folks feel it blows half the flavour out the airlock (I haven't specifically noted this myself) but don't forget, the honey flavour often makes a comeback at around 6-12 months of age.

jgoehring
05-16-2013, 12:23 AM
Thanks for the advice everybody. Right now I am very happy with the way this has turned out. After a few short months the batch is already very drinkable and I cant wait to see how it ages. I did bottle one gallon just to get the practice and I have another gallon batch of the same pyment bulk ageing just to see the difference down the road. The experience with the 1118 taught me a lot. Including how to fashion an on the fly blow off tube.