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View Full Version : planning next batch...20% abv



rj_picou
07-20-2013, 08:14 PM
I'm planning my attack for my next batch. I'm want to try my hand at step feeding.

i used the calculator and it syphered out:
4.445# honey with a OG of 1.62
Well...i know from this forum that's not gonna work!!! I figured i could start with:
2.5# honey OG 1.090ish. oh yeah, I'm using EC-1118
by my estimate, if i let the gravity get down to 1.015 and add 1# of honey it should go up to 1.050ish. i can do this twice and get to 20%abv...

I'm like a sponge...y'all are water...hydrate me please!!!

theEnvoy
07-20-2013, 08:30 PM
40 proof is what it is.

Vance G
07-20-2013, 08:51 PM
There are no guarentees but it might get that high an ABV or it could stall out. I would make sure that I added yeast nutrient and energizer and a fist full of raisins seems to help. I have a batch I call resident evil that is still aging 23 months after pitching and it is a fine drink and I expect it to get better. Eight months ago I had to be talked out of dumping it down the floor drain as it was rank and seemingly getting worse. It was supposed to be a sweet traditional but I mistakenly used EC-1118! As far as step feeding, Chevette Girl has the good plan for that. Go ahead and do this, but plan on two years aging at a minimum. Then you will have something nice, chances are.

fatbloke
07-21-2013, 03:03 AM
No guarantee of 20% with ec-1118 anyway. Its rated to 18 so you might have to look into fermenting with an eau de vive yeast, some of which I understand, go to 20% plus.

You'll likely need very good/higher level nutrition, good aeration and staggering the nutrition too...... optimum temp control would likely be helpful as would good pH monitoring/control......

Robusto
07-23-2013, 04:57 PM
Hey there-
While there are no guarantee that EC-1118 will get you there, there are things that you can do to stack the deck in your favor. As you have noted, step feeding is definitely needed. Also, when I do this I start with a lot of properly prepared yeast. Proper rehydration is key here. I usually start with 10 grams of yeast for a 1-1.5 gallon batch. Is this over kill? Probably. But for the extra $1.00 in yeast, I can sleep well knowing that I have enough soldiers it the fight. What I like to do is to give them a regular breakfast to start, say 1.10 ish, and then make their lunch their big meal and then feed them a light dinner… if that makes sense. I like to add the big middle dose of honey when the yeast is really in a vigorous ferment. Also- aeration/ oxygenation is key. Your yeast are going to need a ton of healthy cells to do this and healthy cells means proper aeration/ oxygenation.

Check out my Viking Blod Clone here:

http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php?t=21651

It came out pretty good and its only young.