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RMJ
09-10-2013, 08:29 PM
What would you recommend purchasing in order to have a complete stock of material on hand for mead making? We already have the following nutrients/additives:

Yeast Energizer
Yeast Nutrient

We have noticed That in many posts, specific nutrients and additives are often recommended, and many of these we do not have yet.

kchaystack
09-10-2013, 08:41 PM
The new bee guide on the left has a good section about energizer and nutrients, along with other stuff that could help. It also explains what each one does. It is a really good read.

Chevette Girl
09-11-2013, 12:18 AM
Yeast nutrient usually refers to DAP, and yeast energizer usually means some DAP and some vitamins for the yeast. The Fermaid line is recommended because there's the most data available on it, but if you can't get it, whatever yeast energizer you have should be fine.

Fermaid-O is a bit special, it specifically does not contain any DAP and is therefore safe to add later in the fermentation when DAP can't be used by the yeast anymore.

Goferm is an aid to rehydration. I'm sure it's a good idea but my brew store doesn't carry it so I've never used it.

Pectinase (any time you use fruit)

Calcium Carbonate (for raising pH, decreasing acidity)

Potassium metabisulphite or campden tablets (for pre-treating must or stabilization)

Potassium Sorbate (for stabilization)

Acid Blend (sometimes needed in wines but not bad to have on hand to perk up a bland mead, just don't add it before fermentation)

GntlKnigt1
09-11-2013, 05:24 AM
...endorsing what Chevette Girl said... and don't forget or omit the hydrometer !!!!

RMJ
09-11-2013, 09:07 PM
Yeast nutrient usually refers to DAP, and yeast energizer usually means some DAP and some vitamins for the yeast. The Fermaid line is recommended because there's the most data available on it, but if you can't get it, whatever yeast energizer you have should be fine.

Fermaid-O is a bit special, it specifically does not contain any DAP and is therefore safe to add later in the fermentation when DAP can't be used by the yeast anymore.

Goferm is an aid to rehydration. I'm sure it's a good idea but my brew store doesn't carry it so I've never used it.

Pectinase (any time you use fruit)

Calcium Carbonate (for raising pH, decreasing acidity)

Potassium metabisulphite or campden tablets (for pre-treating must or stabilization)

Potassium Sorbate (for stabilization)

Acid Blend (sometimes needed in wines but not bad to have on hand to perk up a bland mead, just don't add it before fermentation)

Thank you for the great reply Chevette Girl,
It was really what we were looking for, and we will be picking up the items you suggested.
The Yeast Nutrient and Yeast Energizer (Diammonium Phospate, Springcell, and Magnesium Sulphite) we already have, but had acquired from AGS and LD Carlson.
We do have several additional questions however. By Pectinase I am assuming you mean Pectin Enzyme, and was wondering which is better, the dry or liquid?
We have a blueberry mead recipe that requires gypsum or water crystals and we’re not sure which is better, or which supplier is best.
Irish moss is also an ingredient in that recipe and we are not sure about what to get as there are different types.
Finally we were wondering about an ingredient called Campden (sodium or potassium, and tablet or powder) which is better or are they used in different cases?
Thanks again for all the helpful information, there are so many items mentioned it’s hard to narrow down where to start.

RMJ
09-11-2013, 09:32 PM
...endorsing what Chevette Girl said... and don't forget or omit the hydrometer !!!!

Thank you for the reply GnglKnigt1,

That hydrometer seems to be a brewer’s best friend, and we certainly won’t forget the hydrometer as we have acquired two of them. I purchased a wine making kit for my wife from LD Carlson at Christmas, and that kit came with the hydrometer and 6 gallon carboy as well as primary fermenter. Several months later we were lucky enough to find on Craig’s list someone local selling brewing supplies, and I purchased their equipment, which included one 5 gallon carboy, 8 one gallon carboy’s , 25 beer bottles, as well as another hydrometer and floating thermometer for $50.00. We’ve since then also gotten a long probe thermometer to reach into the center of the large carboy’s. If you know of any other equipment we should be getting it would be appreciated. We also got a great deal on 60lbs of wild flower honey from a local bee keeper, and if you know of any good 1 gallon wildflower recipes to start with we would certainly appreciate that also.

GntlKnigt1
09-12-2013, 01:33 AM
Thank you for the reply GnglKnigt1,

That hydrometer seems to be a brewer’s best friend, and we certainly won’t forget the hydrometer as we have acquired two of them. I purchased a wine making kit for my wife from LD Carlson at Christmas, and that kit came with the hydrometer and 6 gallon carboy as well as primary fermenter. Several months later we were lucky enough to find on Craig’s list someone local selling brewing supplies, and I purchased their equipment, which included one 5 gallon carboy, 8 one gallon carboy’s , 25 beer bottles, as well as another hydrometer and floating thermometer for $50.00. We’ve since then also gotten a long probe thermometer to reach into the center of the large carboy’s. If you know of any other equipment we should be getting it would be appreciated. We also got a great deal on 60lbs of wild flower honey from a local bee keeper, and if you know of any good 1 gallon wildflower recipes to start with we would certainly appreciate that also.


Trying to think of things for you.... well, do you have a corker? The one in my avatar is a 'vintage' one that I have owned for close to 40 years, but is not as good as the double handles ones sold now. Also, spend the $25 a year to be a patron here on GotMead, which gives you access to the forums and some of the most knowledgable meadmakers in America, or the world, even !!! Also, do you have racking siphons, hoses and equipment?

As for recipes, that are tons in the patron area. In the Forum Home screen, click on Search and hit enter. I just tried a search using 'wildflower' and came up with 11 pages of results (about 20 entries per page). Whatever you do, keep a mead log posted, so folks can help, suggest, or just throw their 2 cents worth in.

Oh... and welcome to GotMead !!

loveofrose
09-12-2013, 02:37 PM
Instead of calcium carbonate, use potassium carbonate. Calcium carbonate tends to add a chalky flavor and is not as soluble in solution. It also takes more to get the job done.

In addition, potassium carbonate is better due to the fact that potassium is limited in must.

anir dendroica
09-12-2013, 02:58 PM
Pectinase = Pectic Enzyme. I've only ever seen and used the solid form; the liquid is just pre-dissolved and probably more expensive.

Gypsum = calcium sulfate. Water crystals = 2/3 gypsum, 1/3 magnesium sulfate. Epsom salt = pure magnesium sulfate. These are used to add "hardness" (i.e. calcium and/or magnesium) to water. Unless you are brewing with distilled/reverse osmosis water you won't notice a difference if you omit them, but adding the recommended amounts isn't going to hurt anything either and they are dirt cheap.

Irish moss is a fining/clarifying agent commonly used in beer that helps proteins to precipitate out after boiling. If the recipe calls for boiling, then it may be of some use. It is a dried seaweed, and the different formulations should be more or less equivalent.

Speaking of fining agents, Bentonite can be helpful for getting yeast and proteins to settle following fermentation so you don't have to wait many months for the mead to clear. I usually use 1 1/2 tsp per 5 gallons, dissolved in a cup of boiling water 24 hours and shaken well prior to adding to the must/mead. If you just add the powder it will sink and not do much good.

Sodium and potassium metabisulfite are equivalent as it is the metabisulfite and not the sodium/potassium that does the job. From what I have read potassium is more readily soluble, more commonly used, and less likely to contribute taste to the final product. The tablets are typically crushed before use, so they are really just a way of getting a more accurate dose vs. powder. At homebrew scales it is hard to measure the powder precisely so the tablets are a good idea.


Thank you for the great reply Chevette Girl,
It was really what we were looking for, and we will be picking up the items you suggested.
The Yeast Nutrient and Yeast Energizer (Diammonium Phospate, Springcell, and Magnesium Sulphite) we already have, but had acquired from AGS and LD Carlson.
We do have several additional questions however. By Pectinase I am assuming you mean Pectin Enzyme, and was wondering which is better, the dry or liquid?
We have a blueberry mead recipe that requires gypsum or water crystals and we’re not sure which is better, or which supplier is best.
Irish moss is also an ingredient in that recipe and we are not sure about what to get as there are different types.
Finally we were wondering about an ingredient called Campden (sodium or potassium, and tablet or powder) which is better or are they used in different cases?
Thanks again for all the helpful information, there are so many items mentioned it’s hard to narrow down where to start.

Chevette Girl
09-12-2013, 09:44 PM
Campden tablets are just potassium (or sometimes sodium) metabisulphite, in easy-to-measure tablet form.