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View Full Version : What's your fav Specific Gravity?



McJeff
10-04-2013, 06:43 PM
Generally speaking of course.

theEnvoy
10-04-2013, 07:16 PM
Mine seems to fall around 1.008, but like it higher (1.015) for a real tart mead like Cranberry.... 1.008 also seems to be where most of my beers ferment out... (these are ending gravities)

joemirando
10-04-2013, 08:09 PM
Depends on the mead, but my current favorite is a backsweetened mead that checked in at 1.030. It tastes much much drier than that tho. I made a cherry mel that was so sweet and sour at the same time that it made me think of that stupid car commercial... about sweet OR sour chicken.

Joe

McJeff
10-05-2013, 09:05 AM
Of course it depends on the flavors. But I'm really liking the 1.015-1.019 range.

Chevette Girl
10-05-2013, 10:23 AM
I've had 1.020 that wasn't sweet enough and 1.010 that was too sweet, but usually I like something in that range. Sometimes as low as 1.005 but usually if it's lower than that, it's something I will have one glass of in an evening and it will take me all evening to drink it.

danr
10-05-2013, 11:45 AM
Maybe 1.015 but it is too early to say. I am pretty sure it is between 1.00 and 1.02, but I still have a lot of mead making and drinking to do.

Medsen Fey
10-05-2013, 12:23 PM
1.070
(Yeah, that's not a typo. You just need the right balance)




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akueck
10-05-2013, 05:06 PM
That's funny, I was ready to come and say 1.100--as an OG. I tend to wind up with FGs around 0.995-1.005, and I have yet to backsweeten a batch.

Bob1016
10-05-2013, 06:43 PM
Balance! Generally I've enjoyed drier meads, but the right acid, oak, tannin level, age and complexity can make even the sweetest meads spectacular.
About 75% of the meads I've done have been 0.996-1.000, but this year I'll have a few sweeter batches, hopefully even something at ~1.080 (starfruit).

bernardsmith
10-05-2013, 09:29 PM
Generally speaking of course.

Doesn't this really depend on the ABV and the acidity and other components like astringency and flavor and varietals used and doesn't all that really speak to personal preferences? Isn't that a bit like asking what your favorite fruit is?

McJeff
10-05-2013, 10:10 PM
Thank you for recapping the title

kudapucat
10-07-2013, 07:39 PM
I like 1.005-1.040 Traditionals a bit dry, high tannin a bit sweet.
I don't care how well balanced a 1.070 mead is, I have a couple of objections
1. My gut's big enough already
2. Honey's expensive, I'd prefer most of it become alcohol.

Medsen Fey
10-07-2013, 08:06 PM
... I have a couple of objections
1. My gut's big enough already
2. Honey's expensive, I'd prefer most of it become alcohol.

Well, it doesn't matter if it goes in as etoh or sugar, those carbons are still going to wind up settling around your midsection. :D

As for the cost, I cannot argue that. Only thing I can say is that little wifey's pleasure is worth every single hard-earned penny. ;)

anir dendroica
10-07-2013, 08:35 PM
Starting: 1.125 (1.110-1.130)
Finishing: 1.012 (1.005-1.020)

Anything over 1.020 is too sweet for me, unless it is balanced by strong acids or tannins (though even then I prefer around 1.018.). Under 1.005 is good for demonstrating excellent technique and varietal honey, as it takes a really clean flavor profile to taste good dry. But I do like my meads to taste like they were made from honey, and a little sweetness does wonders in that regard.

kudapucat
10-08-2013, 02:24 AM
Well, it doesn't matter if it goes in as etoh or sugar, those carbons are still going to wind up settling around your midsection. :D


Yes, which is why I'd leave it out, after ensuring there was sufficient alcohol for the desired purpose of the drink. If I can make it taste as well balanced, and as sweet, but have the FG lower, then less carbs, less dollars.


Yeah if I boost the alcohol just to use up the sugar, it makes no difference, but getting drunk has not been a priority in drinking for me in many a moon.

Maeloch
10-08-2013, 05:09 AM
Well I've been starting most stuff off at around 1.100 while I find my feet. Some of it will will get backsweetened, or more honey added when racking to ferment, or just left.

Not sure on my final taste, but I backsweetened some JAO to 1.020 that fermented dry and it was fine at first, but had a bottle a week later and it was too sweet. I appreciate (as I'm learning reading here) that it depends on what you're making.

mannye
10-08-2013, 11:09 AM
1.070
(Yeah, that's not a typo. You just need the right balance)




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I can vouche for that after tasting Medsne's perfectly balanced tangerine mead!

loveofrose
10-08-2013, 12:25 PM
My favorite depends a lot on weather and food.
Hot (90F+) or with food, give me 1.00 or lower.
Moderate (60-90F), 1.05.
Cold (40-60F), 1.01.
Snow and ice a foot deep, 1.02 or 1.04 with bourbon.

Mikeymu
10-10-2013, 05:59 PM
That's funny, I was ready to come and say 1.100--as an OG. I tend to wind up with FGs around 0.995-1.005, and I have yet to backsweeten a batch.

If it's a melomel, can you taste the honey once it's matured at such dry gravities?

Medsen Fey
10-10-2013, 08:35 PM
If it's a melomel, can you taste the honey once it's matured at such dry gravities?

Yes, with a little aging the honey will come through.

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Mikeymu
10-11-2013, 03:49 AM
Yes, with a little aging the honey will come through.

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;D I haven't yet managed to age one more than a year so I need to ask how much aging is required?

Bob1016
10-11-2013, 06:28 AM
It depends on the honey and the techniques. Does wine taste like grape juice? No, atleast not good wine! Dry meads don't taste like honey (for a while) but are distinct based on variety of honey, and are typically very floral.
A year is when they start to get good in my opinion. At that point it is a test of patience, and an art in not drinking them too fast.

Medsen Fey
10-11-2013, 08:54 AM
Yes, with a little aging the honey will come through. now Free ('http://tapatalk.com/m?id=10')

Let me clarify this a bit. Like traditional meads, it can take 12-18 months for the honey aroma to come back fully in a dry melomel. How much it shows depends on the honey and the recipe. Bland processed honey is going to show less. Recipes that are very heavy on fruit may bury the honey and be a lot more like a fruit wine. I've done this with big red, berry melomels (like 4 pounds of fruit per gallon) and I don't mind fruit-dominant batches like that. If I wanted the honey to show more, I could simply back off the fruit, or backsweeten a little. You can tweak it to get the results you want.


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