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View Full Version : NewBee Recipe.....advice please :)



mofojo
12-06-2013, 11:57 AM
Hello All,
I know that I am an extreme novice at this and started my first batch of Mead about 4 months ago with the following recipe and technique that was bestowed upon me by the local homebrewing store.

1. 3lb Wildflower Honey
2. 1 pack(5g) of Lalvin 71B-1122 wine yeast
3. a pinch of Wyeast Brewers Yeast Nutrient

Here are the steps I followed;
1. Sanitize everything with IO Star
2. Warm honey in the jug in a warm water bath
3. Pour honey into 1 Gallon Glass Jug
4. Whip honey with a Whip Wine Degasser for 3-5 minutes using drill
5. Add 3 quarts water, whip again to mix the must
6. Add a pinch of Nutrient
7. Add the yeast (i just poured in the dry yeast) it slowly mixed
8. Cork with a airlock

I let it sit in the dark for 4 months, all the Flocculation was accumilated at the bottom of the bottle. I used an autosiphon and racked to a new sanitized gallon jug. I mixed in 1oz of sweet orange peel and a few cinnamon stick. I tasted the mix at this time and it was not bad...I could certainly taste alcohol. Here is a link to what it looks like now;

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-f8NrC3QvWPg/UqHvTls3gKI/AAAAAAAACu0/y66XEWsdKQ8/w625-h469-no/20131206_093739.jpg

Last night I made two new batches following the same method but in each I added frozen fruit that I mashed, 1 strawberry and 1 rasberry - no additives. They look like this this morning after 12 hours;

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-vL5_rfeO1ck/UqHvf-R25tI/AAAAAAAACvM/F7BPsLruotc/w625-h469-no/20131206_093827.jpg

Here are my questions;
1. Should I have prepared the yeast differently? added it to water then poured into the must?

2. Do I need to gently stir the yeast formed at the top with the fruit mix to avoid a cap? how often?

3. Have I made poison :o?

Any advice is much appreciated, I am new so please go easy on me.....

fatbloke
12-06-2013, 01:04 PM
Well there's no real standards but knowing the starting gravity, the yeast tolerance and something about yeast nutrition helps make better batches.......

The newbee guide (linked in left side yellow box) is worth reading.......

The recommended techniques aren't perfect but using them makes life and diagnosis infinitely easier.......

mofojo
12-06-2013, 01:44 PM
Well there's no real standards but knowing the starting gravity, the yeast tolerance and something about yeast nutrition helps make better batches.......

The newbee guide (linked in left side yellow box) is worth reading.......

The recommended techniques aren't perfect but using them makes life and diagnosis infinitely easier.......


Thank you, I did in fact read the guide last night after my round 2, thus my questions about stiring the and concerns about the cap of yeast on the fruit mix.

fatbloke
12-06-2013, 06:03 PM
Well, just pitching dry yeast will work but its usually easier if you rehydrate the yeast as per pack instrictions and usually works even better if you use GoFerm when rehydrating it and then pitching, but not adding any nutrient or energiser until you see some sign of active fermentation.

Aerating the must is also routine for many of us. I generally stir twice a day, measuring gravity once a day. I usually split the total nutrient into 2 parts (some split it into 3 or more parts). I usually add something like 2/3 or 3/4 of the total once there's some bubbling then the rest goes in once the batch hits its 1/3 sugar break.

If you have any sort of air space with floating fruit debris, it can cap so to prevent it even after youve finished aerating (with its side effect of gas removal), you can gently swirl the fermenter to keep any floating debris moist.

But making poison ? No. Just that the ferment is one part of the process, so its entirely feasible that when the ferment has finished, initially, it can taste bloody hideous. Thats why you read up and learn about back sweetening and acid balancing etc. Often the most important ingredient is patience, as it can need months or even years to age.

Some recipes can be quicker than others, so you have to think on that too. People do get an idea of making a batch with the aim to have it ready in a number of months, but more often than not, it doesn't work like that......

kudapucat
12-08-2013, 05:55 PM
Yep, not poison.
Strawberries will turn to complete mush, and will waste a little mead by settling loosly on the bottom of the carboy. The same (to a lesser extent goes for raspberries)
Freezing the berries is a good idea, it busts the cells open to let the sugar and flavour out.
I would always recommend using a fruit bag with these kinds of fruit, or even any fruit really, though it's hard to manage in a carboy.
Use what you've learnt from the NewBee guide and you'll be fine. If anything is still unclear after reading it, don't be afraid to ask. Nobody understands everything the first time around.

Oh, and FWIW LHBS generally don't know all that much about mead, though they oft pretend to. It would seem you weren't given too much of a bum-steer this time though.