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Alban
02-07-2014, 01:09 PM
Hi everyone,

I started my first batch of mead yesterday, here are a few details:
1.35L of honey
3.6L of mineral water
Yeast K47
1/2 teaspoon of Nutrients
Banana extract (1 banana cut in slices, in boiling water for 30min and then filtered)


All of that in a 5L plastic container.

I tried to follow the instructions as precisely as I could (I even sterilized my whole forearm with boiling water by accident :eek:).
I shaked the must a lot to oxygenate it, then put it in a corner of my room, protected of the light by some stuff.

It started bubbling through the airlock this night (around 6h after I put the yeast in it approximately).
My question was: should I oxygenate and provide some nutrient or is it too late? I read that I had to do it for the first 3 days, but stopping as soon as it was bubbling.

Thanks in advance for you help!

PS: sorry for my english, it's not my native language

GntlKnigt1
02-07-2014, 02:35 PM
Yes...you should add diammonium phosphate (DAP) and also micronutrient mixture for yeast, which would likely have yeast hulls, potassium and other minerals. What country are you doing this in?

Sent from Arthur Dent's towel smothering a volume of Vogon poetry, some of which just leaked out.

Alban
02-07-2014, 03:21 PM
I added some DAP at the beggining, so I put a little bit every day for a few (2-3) days? And I have to oxygenate the must, even if the growth phase of the yeast is ended?

An other problem apear when I came back today, I left too little space between the must and the top of my container, so a little bit of must is trying to escape through my airlock. Can I remove it to clean it and put some water in the airlock without any risk?

By the way, I'm in England right now, but I come from France

mmclean
02-07-2014, 04:26 PM
By the way, I'm in England right now, but I come from France

Wow, did you have to leave the country to make mead?

Will they let you back in if they find out what you have been doing? :)

mmclean
02-07-2014, 04:29 PM
Sorry. ;)

Air lock will be fine to clean and replace. No problem.

Alban
02-07-2014, 05:00 PM
Wow, did you have to leave the country to make mead?

Will they let you back in if they find out what you have been doing? :)

Local producers were afraid of competition!

Thanks for the airlock, that's what I thought!
And concerning the oxygenation? Is it ok even if it's already bubbling? (every 9scd or less vs every 16scd this morning)

mmclean
02-07-2014, 05:14 PM
I like to aerate twice a day up to the 1/3 sugar break.

After that just a slow stir once a day until I am ready to rack off the gross lees.

MJ7
02-07-2014, 11:44 PM
Local producers were afraid of competition!

Thanks for the airlock, that's what I thought!
And concerning the oxygenation? Is it ok even if it's already bubbling? (every 9scd or less vs every 16scd this morning)


I've been told only to aerate in the beginning, this is coming from seasoned mazers. If you aerate you can oxidize the must and your overall flavor profile will resemble sherry. It's only needed to get the yeast going, you should not have to aerate after this.

I would be more worried about the plastic container you are fermenting in, as I have spoken to plenty of people that have had finished products that tasted like plastic.

fatbloke
02-08-2014, 12:13 AM
I've been told only to aerate in the beginning, this is coming from seasoned mazers. If you aerate you can oxidize the must and your overall flavor profile will resemble sherry. It's only needed to get the yeast going, you should not have to aerate after this.

I would be more worried about the plastic container you are fermenting in, as I have spoken to plenty of people that have had finished products that tasted like plastic.

Both points are bum steers........

Yeast need oxygen to develop properly. The suggestion of aeration down to the 1/3rd sugar break is a guide that gives a fixed point to aim for, to allow for an appropriate level of fermentation.

Oxidation can indeed make a sherry like note.......hows that gonna happen if the yeast cells grab any they can get on the way past and any that builds up at the liquid/air space interface is pushed out as CO2 is heavier than air/O2 so sits under it during active ferment......

Plasticisers leeching out is an issue with polycarbonate as its made with BPA's. HDPE and PET are fine for the ferment. Its usually suggested to use glass for aging as the plastics are slightly oxygen permeable. Oxidation is a slow process plus alcohol being a solvent its feasible that it could damage or weaken the plastic, yet if this were an issue why would "they" use 1000ltr IBC's to ship 95.6% NGS ?

Plus there'd be no such thing as a plastic fermenter..........

MJ7
02-08-2014, 12:29 AM
Both points are bum steers........

Yeast need oxygen to develop properly. The suggestion of aeration down to the 1/3rd sugar break is a guide that gives a fixed point to aim for, to allow for an appropriate level of fermentation.

Oxidation can indeed make a sherry like note.......hows that gonna happen if the yeast cells grab any they can get on the way past and any that builds up at the liquid/air space interface is pushed out as CO2 is heavier than air/O2 so sits under it during active ferment......

Plasticisers leeching out is an issue with polycarbonate as its made with BPA's. HDPE and PET are fine for the ferment. Its usually suggested to use glass for aging as the plastics are slightly oxygen permeable. Oxidation is a slow process plus alcohol being a solvent its feasible that it could damage or weaken the plastic, yet if this were an issue why would "they" use 1000ltr IBC's to ship 95.6% NGS ?

Plus there'd be no such thing as a plastic fermenter..........

Many assumptions here, I will take first hand accounts over assumptions any day. The OP did not state what type of material his plastic was comprised of either.

GntlKnigt1
02-08-2014, 04:01 AM
I agree with Fatbloke. Stir/degas/oxygenate to the 1/3 sugar break is a typical and usual practice. I often do so even beyond that point and have not had a batch oxidize yet (well, perhaps one). If you add nutrients every day or according to a schedule, you are practicing SNA---Stepped Nutrient Additions. I (usually) don't do that... and just front load the the DAP and nutrients, although some manufacturer's biologists suggest that cell walls are stronger with SNA. And, the advantages of doing primary fermentation in a pail are so great that I am baffled that anyone tries to do it in a carboy. Don't get me wrong; I love my carboys, but using them as primary fermenters is rather like driving a cement mixer to the store for your weekly groceries. You could do it, but why?

MourneMead
02-08-2014, 04:15 AM
Don't get me wrong; I love my carboys, but using them as primary fermenters is rather like driving a cement mixer to the store for your weekly groceries. You could do it, but why?


I treble this - but it took me a while to realise it.

fatbloke
02-08-2014, 06:05 AM
Many assumptions here, I will take first hand accounts over assumptions any day. The OP did not state what type of material his plastic was comprised of either.
No...... I was alluding to your previous post my friend.......:cool:

rtu
02-08-2014, 10:09 AM
From the BJCP Mead Study Guide, pg 92:

Anyone who has ever stirred a fermenting beverage knows the foaming, triggered by the release
of CO2, can make one heck of a mess! To help minimize this, you should mix the nutrient blend
into cup of must and add it back to the fermenter. Then begin to slowly stir the must to release
the main portion of the CO2 gas. After the foaming has subsided you can begin to stir more
vigorously. Mix the must well enough to introduce plenty of oxygen into the fermenting must.
Oxygen is needed by the yeast throughout the growth phase. Oxidation is not a huge concern
until you get past 50 percent sugar depletion.

There are other, more scientific references that I have read but for some silly reason I did not add them to my list of reference material. I'll have to rectify that.

MJ7
02-08-2014, 10:54 AM
I love my carboys, but using them as primary fermenters is rather like driving a cement mixer to the store for your weekly groceries. You could do it, but why?

For melomel I could see an advantage if you have a lot of fruit, cleaning that out of a glass carboy would be a pain.

There is no worry doing a primary and secondary in a glass carboy, many follow that train of thought, even some food grade plastics leak oxygen.

Alban
02-08-2014, 10:57 AM
Thanks for all these replies!

Don't worry for my carboy, it's PET, I don't think it will cause any problem. It's just for the fermentation, I will not let my mead in it for 3 years...
But why a carboy and not a pail? Well I guess because I have no idea of what I'm doing :p Actually, it was just a trial, a friend is visiting me in a few weeks and I wanted my mead to be drinkable for him. Then no switch in a 2nd fermenter, nor racking. It's probably a blaspheme for you, but next bacth will be more correct, I promise you.

By the way, floculation occurs in my must, but I think it's not really a big deal.


I'm still waiting for my hydrometer to have more precise data. I know it will be useless without the initiall SG but it's better than nothing :)

rtu
02-08-2014, 04:35 PM
Thanks for all these replies!

Don't worry for my carboy, it's PET, I don't think it will cause any problem. It's just for the fermentation, I will not let my mead in it for 3 years...
But why a carboy and not a pail?

What is the pail made from? No matter the material, if it's what I think of as a pail, which is a bucket with a large, very difficult to seal opening, then the carboy is better given the better sealing capability.



By the way, floculation occurs in my must, but I think it's not really a big deal.

That is what you want. As the fermentation slows and stops the yeast die off and settle to the bottom.

Alban
02-15-2014, 10:48 AM
I finally received my hydrometer, which will allow me to do something a little bit less random.

At day 9 (today), the SG is of 1042; since I don't know the original SG, it's less usefull but still good to know.

The taste seems ok, still quite sweet, with the correct acidity, and it surprisingly (at least for me) tastes like cider.
However, it does not seems reall complex, and I fear a lack of body despit the banana extract; but it's probably too soon make this kind of assumptions.

What is more worrying is the fermentation: it is still active, but quite slow (about every minute and a half), especially compare to the first week with a peak of bubbling every 6 seconds.

Does it seems normal?

MJ7
02-15-2014, 11:58 AM
I finally received my hydrometer, which will allow me to do something a little bit less random.

At day 9 (today), the SG is of 1042; since I don't know the original SG, it's less usefull but still good to know.

The taste seems ok, still quite sweet, with the correct acidity, and it surprisingly (at least for me) tastes like cider.
However, it does not seems reall complex, and I fear a lack of body despit the banana extract; but it's probably too soon make this kind of assumptions.

What is more worrying is the fermentation: it is still active, but quite slow (about every minute and a half), especially compare to the first week with a peak of bubbling every 6 seconds.

Does it seems normal?

This is normal for a D47, it was a D47 yeast you used (and not a K47?), correct?

You are probably 7-10 days before it goes dry at 1.005 or lower. If you want to let the yeast finish go head, if you want to preserve some of the sweetness and flavor from the honey try to stop the ferment anywhere between 1.010-1.020.

Good luck.

Alban
02-15-2014, 12:19 PM
This is normal for a D47, it was a D47 yeast you used (and not a K47?), correct?

You are probably 7-10 days before it goes dry at 1.005 or lower. If you want to let the yeast finish go head, if you want to preserve some of the sweetness and flavor from the honey try to stop the ferment anywhere between 1.010-1.020.

Good luck.

Yes you're right, D47, not K47, my bad.

Thanks for the answer!
As I would prefer keep it relatively pure, how should I rack it? I don't have enough room in my fridge, and I presume outside temperature is not cold enough to stop the fermentation process. Is there a solution or I can't skip sulfites?

Also, can I transfer my batch in a secondary fermentation tank for the racking, even if it's a 5L tank for a 4L batch? I think it should be avoided

MJ7
02-15-2014, 01:07 PM
Yes you're right, D47, not K47, my bad.

Thanks for the answer!
As I would prefer keep it relatively pure, how should I rack it? I don't have enough room in my fridge, and I presume outside temperature is not cold enough to stop the fermentation process. Is there a solution or I can't skip sulfites?

Also, can I transfer my batch in a secondary fermentation tank for the racking, even if it's a 5L tank for a 4L batch? I think it should be avoided

What is your overall stopping SG goal?

If you want it to stop at say 1.010, begin these next steps at 1.015.

1. Cold Crash, if you can't cold crash (for D47 50 F and below would suffice) read next steps.

2. Super Kleer. Pick up some super kleer at your local wine/beer store and add it to clear the must. Once clear (usually within 24-48 hours), rack it.

3. Add potassium sulfite + potassium sorbate OR just add potassium sorbate. Potassium sorbate will inhibit the yeast from reproducing, potassium sorbate is recommended to work best in environments with potassium sulfite, HOWEVER, it is not required. If you want to use less chemicals or additives just use sorbate.

4. After following step 3, wait 48 hours, then filter (optional), then bottle and enjoy.

5. If your must has a strong alcohol flavor or a dull flavor, bulk age it stop at step 2. Clear the must, rack into a secondary and age it for however long you see fit. After you are content with aging, revert to step 3 and 4.

For bulk aging you want little to no air space, this will reduce oxygen exposure and not give the head room needed for re-fermentation.

Good luck.

Chevette Girl
02-15-2014, 03:35 PM
If you're going to be drinking this relatively quickly and don't want to hit it with the chemicals, hit it with a clarifying or fining agent as suggested (bentonit is a good start and it's completely natural), then cold crash it as best you can (I'm not sure what the temperature is in England right now, but if it's close to refrigerator temperatures, ie, between 0 and 4C, you could put it outside until it's thoroughly chilled), rack it off the lees before it warms up, don't seal your bottles with corks (use screw-tops or flip-tops so you can let off any pressure that builds up) and keep them in the fridge, checking them every week or so for any signs of carbonation and letting it off if there is.

But when you've got the time and the chemicals, it's a lot safer to let the ferment finish naturally, hit it with stabilizing chemicals, backsweeten if if you need to, then hit it with a fining agent, and before you bottle it, make sure your hydrometer readings aren't changing over time since you added more honey to backsweeten.

PS, Bonjour a vous de Canada! :) And your English is fine, there are several active members on this forum whose native tongue isn't English, and those whose first language IS will try to figure out your meaning without negative comments because we know you speak our language better than we speak yours!

GntlKnigt1
02-16-2014, 08:30 AM
The following is from an Oskaar post 06-17-2007, 10:19 PM .....


Zero change in gravity for a period of two weeks is far too short a period to assume that the (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead)mead (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead) has stabilized. I've had meads that have sat for 3-5 months with no change, then BLAMMO, off they go again. This is even after 2 rackings. The problem with not filtering or sulfiting and sorbating is that you're at the mercy of time and guesswork. You cannot see the yeast with the naked eye, and while (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead)mead (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead) can appear clear, it can still have a significant enough population of yeast in suspension to begin fermenting again. You need to monitor the (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead)mead (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead) for several months (more than three in my opinion) in order to make that leap. Even then you're rolling the dice. If you want to stack the odds in your favor you should cold crash the (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=carboy)carboy (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=carboy) at about 39 degrees for two weeks and immediately rack after that time. Take a gravity reading after the (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead)mead (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead) has come up to room temperature and monitor again for eight weeks. At that point if you see no changes in gravity I would still cold crash again for a week and monitor for another four afterwards. Then I'd feel safe bottling. That's no guarantee by the way, but it seems to work for me on a pretty regular basis.

fatbloke
02-16-2014, 11:20 AM
-----snip----- OR just add potassium sorbate. Potassium sorbate will inhibit the yeast from reproducing, potassium sorbate is recommended to work best in environments with potassium sulfite, HOWEVER, it is not required. If you want to use less chemicals or additives just use sorbate.
-----snip-----
I've noticed that you've mentioned this more than once. Why ? I don't understand...
Link...... (http://www.letsdowine.com/mafe.html) and quote from that link.....



Malolactic Fermentation' (ML) describes a fermentation by malolactic bacterial culture (http://www.letsdowine.com/bamaba.html) (leuconostoc oenos) that are able to convert malic acid from grapes into lactic acid. It occurs alongside, and in addition to regular fermentation, and can be desirable for two reasons: Reducing excess acidity. By converting the relatively harsh tasting malic acid into the softer lactic, ML softens the flavor of the wine. Adding complexity. In addition to converting the acid, malolactic bacteria can add a component of 'buttery' flavor (diacetyl), along with more complex flavors and aromas. Uncontrolled ML is very undesirable. The same bacteria responsible for reducing acidity are responsible for the production of sauerkraut, whose flavors and aromas are not what you would expect in a fine wine. In addition, if malolactic bacteria work in the presence of potassium sorbate (a preservative in kit wines and some commercial wines) it will produce geraniol, a compound that smells like a cross between ripe salmon and rotting geraniums

Now I can't see whether the linked article explains about why it's recommended to use sulphite and sorbate, but MLF bacteria won't tolerate sulphites above 20ppm, whereas the addition of 1 crushed campden tablet provides 50ppm per gallon (which I believe is for a US gallon, those of us who work in imp gallons, the same amount of sulphite will provide 44 ppm per gallon).

Either way, if the character of MLF is required in a batch, then you'd likely introduce the bacteria in adequate quantity deliberately, so you certainly wouldn't have used sorbate as you'd ruin the batch as above.

Equally, stopping an active ferment isn't as easy as it sounds. Sulphites and sorbate aren't a magic bullet. You'd most likely, need to cold crash the batch a little higher than you're aiming for as the yeast will still ferment some as the temperature drops. Then, as alluded to in Oskaars quote below, it needs to be kept there for a while.

It's then recommended to rack off the hibernating yeast and add the stabilising chems before it warms back up to ambient temp, which I understand gives the chems time to mix in, and have the desired effect before any remaining yeast can wake up and start doing their thing again. And there will, still be, some viable yeast cells (again, Oskaars quote below).

Ergo, it's considered poor technique and isn't something normally recommended.......

There's likely some good, "sciencey" published info out there that explains it more fully - or at least from a considered and reputable source.

I just use it as my guide as it's never failed so far, and I've not had any batches ruined by just using sorbate without sulphites.

Of course, there are times when sulphites can't be used, like if someone who might drink the mead (or wine etc), has an intolerance of them. If that were the case, any back sweetening would likely have to be conducted using a non-fermentable source of sweetening.......

Don't take my word for it though, there's plenty of guidance out there from reputable sources, who mirror my sentiments........

The following is from an Oskaar post 06-17-2007, 10:19 PM .....


Zero change in gravity for a period of two weeks is far too short a period to assume that the mead (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead) has stabilized. I've had meads that have sat for 3-5 months with no change, then BLAMMO, off they go again. This is even after 2 rackings. The problem with not filtering or sulfiting and sorbating is that you're at the mercy of time and guesswork. You cannot see the yeast with the naked eye, and while mead (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead) can appear clear, it can still have a significant enough population of yeast in suspension to begin fermenting again. You need to monitor the mead (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead) for several months (more than three in my opinion) in order to make that leap. Even then you're rolling the dice. If you want to stack the odds in your favor you should cold crash the carboy (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=carboy) at about 39 degrees for two weeks and immediately rack after that time. Take a gravity reading after the mead (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/vbglossar.php?do=showentry&item=mead) has come up to room temperature and monitor again for eight weeks. At that point if you see no changes in gravity I would still cold crash again for a week and monitor for another four afterwards. Then I'd feel safe bottling. That's no guarantee by the way, but it seems to work for me on a pretty regular basis.
Another excellent quote from Oskaar. Certainly explained better than I can do. But as it says, no guarantee's but it seems to work.......

:cool:

MJ7
02-16-2014, 12:19 PM
I've noticed that you've mentioned this more than once. Why ? I don't understand...
Link...... (http://www.letsdowine.com/mafe.html) and quote from that link.....

Now I can't see whether the linked article explains about why it's recommended to use sulphite and sorbate, but MLF bacteria won't tolerate sulphites above 20ppm, whereas the addition of 1 crushed campden tablet provides 50ppm per gallon (which I believe is for a US gallon, those of us who work in imp gallons, the same amount of sulphite will provide 44 ppm per gallon).

Either way, if the character of MLF is required in a batch, then you'd likely introduce the bacteria in adequate quantity deliberately, so you certainly wouldn't have used sorbate as you'd ruin the batch as above.

Equally, stopping an active ferment isn't as easy as it sounds. Sulphites and sorbate aren't a magic bullet. You'd most likely, need to cold crash the batch a little higher than you're aiming for as the yeast will still ferment some as the temperature drops. Then, as alluded to in Oskaars quote below, it needs to be kept there for a while.

It's then recommended to rack off the hibernating yeast and add the stabilising chems before it warms back up to ambient temp, which I understand gives the chems time to mix in, and have the desired effect before any remaining yeast can wake up and start doing their thing again. And there will, still be, some viable yeast cells (again, Oskaars quote below).

Ergo, it's considered poor technique and isn't something normally recommended.......

There's likely some good, "sciencey" published info out there that explains it more fully - or at least from a considered and reputable source.

I just use it as my guide as it's never failed so far, and I've not had any batches ruined by just using sorbate without sulphites.

Of course, there are times when sulphites can't be used, like if someone who might drink the mead (or wine etc), has an intolerance of them. If that were the case, any back sweetening would likely have to be conducted using a non-fermentable source of sweetening.......

Don't take my word for it though, there's plenty of guidance out there from reputable sources, who mirror my sentiments........

Another excellent quote from Oskaar. Certainly explained better than I can do. But as it says, no guarantee's but it seems to work.......

:cool:

MLB in the presence of sorbate can produce issues, however, I do not understand why MLB would be a problem with mead, the bacteria require specific environments, typically not suitable for most mead. as pH tends to increase with ML inoculation.

Honey does have some malic acid http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814697001660, so it is a possible concern, albeit rare, unless you specifically inoculate the must with the bacteria. Thus, it would be counterintuitive to inoculate your must and then add sorbate, SO IF YOU ARE INOCULATING YOUR MUST WITH maliclacto bacteria DO NOT add sorbate.

The reason I have said you do not need sulphites is potassium sorbate does not specifically need sulphites to inhibit yeast reproduction. It works better in the presence of sulphites, and it works better than sulphites alone.

Of course, there are arguments that sorbates and sulphites can produce off flavors.

As for stopping a fermentation cycle early, I 100% agree.

I prefer cold crashing as is described by the Oskaar quote, I try to avoid additives and chemicals if I can help it, but when time is of the essence sorbate, Super Kleer (as long as the consumers aren't allergic to shell fish), and sulphites are recommended.

Alban
02-17-2014, 03:21 PM
Thanks for all you wise advices!

SG today is 1032 at day 11, so I think it will be ready to cold crash around the day 14 (thursday), at 1015 (to obtain a semi-sweet around 1010. Hopefully). It was way quicker than I thought!

So, my next steps (tell me if something is useless/to avoid) as of it's around 1015:
- Cold crash as I can in my garden for 48h. Not the best solution, but the tempatures are around 8C the day, and probably around 2C at night, so I hope it will be enough.
- Transfer in a secondary jug without all the deposit and clear (didn't find SuperKleer, I took Kwick Clear) for 48h
- Adding some potassium sorbate, wait 48h
- Bottling; wait as long as I can before tasting (probaby one week).

I tasted it today, and was not really convinced. The honey flavour is very light; I almost don't feel the alcohol and it's quite acid. Is it normal? Because of the quick fermentation, does it need to age to develop more flavour / complexity?

MJ7
02-17-2014, 07:46 PM
Thanks for all you wise advices!

SG today is 1032 at day 11, so I think it will be ready to cold crash around the day 14 (thursday), at 1015 (to obtain a semi-sweet around 1010. Hopefully). It was way quicker than I thought!

So, my next steps (tell me if something is useless/to avoid) as of it's around 1015:
- Cold crash as I can in my garden for 48h. Not the best solution, but the tempatures are around 8C the day, and probably around 2C at night, so I hope it will be enough.
- Transfer in a secondary jug without all the deposit and clear (didn't find SuperKleer, I took Kwick Clear) for 48h
- Adding some potassium sorbate, wait 48h
- Bottling; wait as long as I can before tasting (probaby one week).

I tasted it today, and was not really convinced. The honey flavour is very light; I almost don't feel the alcohol and it's quite acid. Is it normal? Because of the quick fermentation, does it need to age to develop more flavour / complexity?

The taste is normal, and I see nothing wrong with your approach, you may need to cold crash it longer, however, usually a week is typical.

Once you rack off more and more yeast the flavor will come alive, adding more complexity and flavor. Aging can help this.

mannye
02-17-2014, 08:38 PM
Keep in mind that most meads aren't really ready to drink for at least 6 months to a year with others going much longer! The quick meads are only supposed to be something to get you going and have very specific recipes that have to followed to the letter. I am not familiar with the recipe you used, but unless it is specifically designed to be quick, don't get discouraged. Your mead is very very new!