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View Full Version : Pascal's Law and Guinness Bottles



xanderphillips
02-10-2014, 08:16 PM
Anyone know if specifically the standard Guinness Draft bottle is up to snuff strength-wise to hold a sparkling mead?

I don't want to shatter anything, but don't want to mess with getting wine bottles either. Besides cracking open a pint of mead at a time would help to slow me down a little!

Also,
If I totally stop the fermentation by adding metabisulfite and sorbate to prevent existing yeasties from going boom, can i still get a sparkling mead, or do I have to NOT put in those 2 guys to do it?

Thanks
Xanderphillips

EricS
02-10-2014, 09:06 PM
To get a sparkling mead you need the yeast to be active. You back sweeten and then bottle and the remaining yeast ferment the honey and there by carbonate it. The only other way is to force carbonate with a keg.

The bottles should be fine for beer level carbonation but wouldn't trying pushing it higher.

mmclean
02-10-2014, 09:13 PM
Beer bottle will hold up to a certain amount of pressure, but not standard wine bottles. Champagne bottles are made to hold higher pressure.

There are many post, with much more detail than I can provide.

Midnight Sun
02-10-2014, 09:23 PM
See this (http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11358) thread for more info on bottles. Don't forget to inspect each bottle for chips or cracks.

xanderphillips
02-10-2014, 09:26 PM
Will check that thread... Thanks!

mannye
02-14-2014, 11:43 AM
And if you're going to be bottle conditioning it's always a good idea to also add some finings so you get a nice compact yeast cake on the bottom of the bottle that doesn't bloom at the slightest jiggle. That way you can pour out into a glass and leave the yeast behind.


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now. G

smertz001
02-17-2014, 11:44 AM
I have been using 187ml champagne bottles with crown caps (Good for 7 volumes) and carbing (naturally) up to 4 volumes. So far no problems. I've only taste tested one of them and it was the last one I bottled which had extra yeast, so had a strong yeast flavour to it.

I believe beer bottles are only really rated for 3 volumes.

Champagne is usually 6 or so volumes from what I remember.

So, some extra information for you there (=

fatbloke
02-17-2014, 03:17 PM
I have been using 187ml champagne bottles with crown caps (Good for 7 volumes) and carbing (naturally) up to 4 volumes. So far no problems. I've only taste tested one of them and it was the last one I bottled which had extra yeast, so had a strong yeast flavour to it.

I believe beer bottles are only really rated for 3 volumes.

Champagne is usually 6 or so volumes from what I remember.

So, some extra information for you there (=
But will "normal" crown caps take champagne pressures ? Champoo bottles will but they're normally stoppered with cork or plastic and wire caged.......

It's something I'd watch for i.e. leakage as carbonation develops......

smertz001
02-17-2014, 03:20 PM
Actually, from all that I've read, crown caps are good to 7 volumes, just as cork and cages. So, it's not something I'm worrying about at this time, especially since I'm not going up that high, just sticking around the 4-5 volume level.

kudapucat
02-17-2014, 04:47 PM
Champagne bottles are made to take crown seals for one very good reason: riddling.

Champagne using 'methode traditionale' is fermented at least partially in bottle.
The bottles are inverted, the necks frozen, then the yeast is removed and they're recorked.
This means each bottle uses 2 corks, and wires etc, which is expensive. So nowadays, they cap them initially, then riddle, cork and sell.
If somebody has a glut, you can often buy champagne with caps on, as the winemaker attempts to save money on a cheap wine in a poor market.

In short: they will hold the pressure. Have no fear.

I also have a friend who when making cidre pasteurises half his juice to have with his breakfast. He bottles in champagne bottles, caps then, then boils them in a big drum. None have ever burst.

mannye
02-17-2014, 05:17 PM
Champagne bottles are made to take crown seals for one very good reason: riddling.

Champagne using 'methode traditionale' is fermented at least partially in bottle.
The bottles are inverted, the necks frozen, then the yeast is removed and they're recorked.
This means each bottle uses 2 corks, and wires etc, which is expensive. So nowadays, they cap them initially, then riddle, cork and sell.
If somebody has a glut, you can often buy champagne with caps on, as the winemaker attempts to save money on a cheap wine in a poor market.

In short: they will hold the pressure. Have no fear.

I also have a friend who when making cidre pasteurises half his juice to have with his breakfast. He bottles in champagne bottles, caps then, then boils them in a big drum. None have ever burst.

Yup. Just big ol' beer bottles as far as I'm concerned. I've got one I've been using and I'm looking for more.

kudapucat
02-18-2014, 04:44 PM
Yup. Just big ol' beer bottles as far as I'm concerned. I've got one I've been using and I'm looking for more.


But much stronger.

mannye
02-18-2014, 06:49 PM
But much stronger.

Oh yeah... a lot thicker.