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View Full Version : So if you noticed one of your meads restarted after being bottled...



McJeff
04-05-2014, 01:25 PM
What would you do? Is there some way to test the bottles intergrity, where is the weak point in the bottle?

GntlKnigt1
04-05-2014, 05:01 PM
UNbottle it all back into fermenter and destabilize with sorbate and sulfite

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Stasis
04-05-2014, 05:22 PM
I think it depends what the FG of the mead was and what bottles you used to store them in. If the FG was very low (dry) and the bottles are usually used to hold sparkling drinks (beer, champagne, sparkling wine... ) then the answer might not be of much alarm. If the mead was sweet enough then a bottle bomb is possible no matter what you bottled into. If the bottles are weak enough bottle bombs are also more likely. Depends how many bottles you have and how long until you will be drinking them...
I wouldn't know what to do if I had a lot of bottles which could possibly become bombs on me. Luckily I really enjoy dry wine/mead and we usually bulk age in the carboy and only bottle when it's ready to drink maybe after at least a year of aging. My practice might change with mead however, bot not yet.
In my very limited experience it seems the weak spot of your average wine bottle would be at the shoulder. The neck and body of the bottle would be a consistent thickness, although even then sometimes alarmingly thin at the body. The shoulder that connects body to neck is sometimes "warped" and might have a very thin spot which is ~1mm thick (I used to cut bottles to use as cups, vases, waterproof bulb housings for aquariums etc). Bottles can vary from one to the other, bottles even vary within themselves with the left hand side possibly being thinner than the side on the right (when cut from the middle and seen from above).
If the mead is placed in 'normal' wine bottles I would be afraid. I never had a bomb but it might be possible that once it blows you wouldn't know which part of the bottle was compromised first.

Stasis
04-05-2014, 05:26 PM
Yeah the general rule would be what GntlKnigt1 said. You gotta draw the line when it comes to bombs.

Edit: ok going off topic here.. Hey GntlKnigt1 tried your Speculaas recipe on my carob and that stuff smells great. I mean REAL GOOD :O

GntlKnigt1
04-06-2014, 07:50 AM
Ahh....mine is aging. I dropped some star anise, cinnamon, and nutmeg in as flavors warped during fermentation

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Medsen Fey
04-06-2014, 11:09 AM
What would you do? Is there some way to test the bottles intergrity, where is the weak point in the bottle?

Put them in the Fridge to lower the temp and lower the pressure. Then open them and follow GntlKnight's advice. Regular wine bottles are not designed to hold ANY pressure. Even beer bottles can be easily exploded - it only takes a drop of 5 or 6 gravity points to create enough to blow a beer bottle.