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Aragorn
05-04-2014, 10:01 PM
Hello! :cool:

I have been looking into making mead for a little bit now and thought this forum looked really helpful! I want to make some mead but I don't want to get it wrong and waste all my delicious honey so I was wondering if you jolly fellows could look at my recipe before I make it and tell me what you think I should change?

I will only be making one gallon batches for a little bit until I can get it to be really good so...

It looks like Lalvin D47 is the yeast of choice for a lot of people so I figured id just use that in the amount recommended on the package but scaled to 1 gallon.

I went to the fresh market and looked at honey and decided that I wanted to use the wildflower honey cause that is my favorite.

-3 lbs of wildflower honey
-Lalvin D47 yeast
-1 gallon spring water
-diammonium phosphate
-1 stick of cinnamon
-1 clove

I figure I would put the honey in my glass carboy and then add the spring water until it is mostly full but leave enough room to pitch the yeast. Then I was gonna put a lid on it and shake it all up until the honey got all dissolved. After that I figured I would rehydrate the yeast (I don't know how to do this exactly but it seems like something I should do) and then toss the yeast in the honey water. Then put an airlock on it and wait I suppose. Then I figured I would just rack it off once it seemed to be done fermenting and add the cinnamon and clove then rack it off again soon after and then hide it from myself so I don't get to tempted and just drink it all before it ages.

What are your thoughts on this? What would you all do differently? I want it to be really good the first time around...

Thank you in advance! :)

mannye
05-04-2014, 10:28 PM
Do you already have the D47? If not, and this is your first mead, look at the JAOM thread. Much easier much quicker and much more satisfying.

I came to mead from 20+ years of beer and I'm glad I tried JAOM first. I have not made a batch of beer since!


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Aragorn
05-04-2014, 11:57 PM
Haha well I am glad to hear that mead is better than beer! That means a lot.

The only real problem I have with this recipe is that I don't like oranges all that much... And does using bread yeast not make it taste yeasty?

EbonHawk
05-05-2014, 12:32 AM
Haha well I am glad to hear that mead is better than beer! That means a lot.

The only real problem I have with this recipe is that I don't like oranges all that much... And does using bread yeast not make it taste yeasty?
Apparently not. Or maybe, if you were to do the same recipe with a more mead-specific yeast, it might be noticeable, but only if you were really looking for it. I haven't seen anyone compare the two yet. (Although I'm sure someone has at some point.) The whole purpose of that recipe is to get one out of the gates as fast as possible, so it's supposed to come out swingin' and get to completion ASAP.



I came to mead from 20+ years of beer and I'm glad I tried JAOM first. I have not made a batch of beer since!
Hey now, why can't we enjoy both? More options means more happiness, for me at least.

mannye
05-05-2014, 08:50 AM
Oh I am sure I will throw a beer kit in a fermenter one of these days, but with the explosion of great craft beers on the market I don't see a reason anymore. I originally started brewing beer so long ago because when moved to Miami, Busch Beer and Old English were about as good as it got. Of course I kept doing it because it was fun. But a trip to total wine these days or even the local supermarket yields dozens of Belgian Ales, local craft brews and great imported beers. I couldn't justify the "double double toil and trouble" anymore.

And then mead. Like chess, it takes minutes to learn and a lifetime to master. No more boiling unless I want to and no more surgical level sanitation! And the raw ingredient, unlike grape wine, is right in my backyard! AND like when I started making beer, the retail offerings are slim and often of inferior quality or of the same quality I can make! Obviously there are some awesome commercial meads but not at the supermarket!


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Aragorn
05-05-2014, 11:02 AM
Haha that is pretty much the exact reason I am taking up mead making. A friend of mine made some that I really liked but I haven't had a commercial mead yet that beats his.

So anyways, I see that the JAOM works really well and it seems pretty foolproof but I don't like oranges and I'd like to go ahead and learn to do it the right way (he was talking about how that recipe was pretty different than how people make mead nowadays). Will the recipe I posted work? And what should I watch out for?

EbonHawk
05-05-2014, 02:28 PM
Nah, I don't agree about the beer at all. Yeah, there are some good ones, but now that I have a brewery/meadery just down the road, I remember why I started doing it in the first place: Taste! and because I could experiment. Plus, I like brewing.

mannye
05-05-2014, 04:28 PM
Keep in mind that there is absolutely ZERO orange flavor in the finished mead. They are there to add somethin' but it ain't flavor. Trust me and make a gallon of JAOM then follow it up with a BOMM. BOMM is actually much quicker than JAOM but I recommend doing the latter first because you can get everything at the local grocery store. AND because it's awesome. While that JAOM is brewing, you can go to the LHBS (Local HomeBrew Store) or to Amazon or your favorite online merchant and purchase the specialty equipment needed for BOMM. Hydrometer, Wyeast 1388, etc.; look at the BOMM protocol and everything you need is listed there. JAOM takes at minimum 8 weeks and up to 12 to be ready to rack into a secondary. BOMM is ready quicker, but it really helps to have the JAOM experience under your belt first.

Aragorn
05-05-2014, 08:16 PM
So I actually got all the equipment like the hydrometer and stuff already cause there is a homebrew store that is closer than the grocery store and I have a few gallon sized glass jugs (4 actually, a size 8 1/2 stopper fits them nicely. The apple cider I love so much comes in them and I thought why not use those?) So could I just do all three at once? The yeast and ingredients are the only other things I need to get.

mannye
05-05-2014, 09:58 PM
I can't see why not! Go for it!


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Aragorn
05-05-2014, 10:09 PM
Alright! I'll start one tomorrow and then the next two later this week. I'll go ahead and start off with the recipe I had originally posted and post the SG once I make it. Is there anything I should be aware of, or anything that won't be obvious that I should know to do this so I don't screw it up? Or maybe some modifications to my recipe I should consider? Or a change in the method? And what all should I include in my mead journal?

mannye
05-05-2014, 11:58 PM
First, if you're going to make JAOM, don't modify anything. Follow the recipe exactly or you will void the warranty. The best thing to do is to put it in a closet or cupboard and forget about it for 8 weeks.

BOMM is similar. If you follow Bray's protocol you can't miss. Heck, it was only the second or third mead I ever made and BOMM made me look like a pro. The BOMM will be ready before the JAOM.

The only thing I would add is to get some acid blend. That way you can play with the sweet/tart balance until you get something you like. Of course, that will come later after all the batches are fermented, aged a bit and clear.

The only way to learn is to do!


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Aragorn
05-07-2014, 11:35 PM
Okay! I made my first batch. I used 3 lbs of Medford Farms wildflower honey and spring water for a one gallon batch. The specific gravity of it was 1.104 and I used Lalvin d47 yeast so I am expecting a relatively dry mead that I will potentially back sweeten and most certainly add spices to. I rehydrated the yeast by what was on the package and then added that plus a little bit of Diammonium Phosphate for nutrient. I shook it up all nice and good so that I had a homogenous mixture. Have I messed up anything yet? And is my next step just adding nutrient at the 1/3 and 2/3 sugar breaks?

Thank you!

Aragorn
05-07-2014, 11:46 PM
Oh and also, is there a way to keep my mead cooler without hiking up my AC bill?

moridin
05-08-2014, 12:28 AM
As far as nutrient additions go, most will tell you not to add any after the 1/3rd sugar break mark


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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 12:29 AM
So I should add a bit at the 1/3 break? Just not after?


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moridin
05-08-2014, 12:31 AM
Yah, that's at least what I have gathered. Still rather new at this myself


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moridin
05-08-2014, 12:32 AM
If you wanted to take a look at how I added my nutrients take a look at my mead log : berry melomel


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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 12:36 AM
Ah I see... You should let me know how it turns out! I wanted to make one with blackberries


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EbonHawk
05-08-2014, 12:54 AM
Oh and also, is there a way to keep my mead cooler without hiking up my AC bill?
Two things come to mind: one is cheap, but not very effective. The other is expensive, but is very effective.

You could get you some kind of tub or aluminum wash bin (I've used one) and set your fermenter (they're glass, right? plastic doesn't work so well) in it. Then, wrap you a nice big towel around it, if they're the 5 or 6.5 gal carboys, and use a smaller one for the gallon size, covering most of the glass and let the extra gather around the base in the tub. Just snug the top edge up around the neck of the carboy or bottle and you can clip the edges where they wrap around the carboy with some of those mailer clips, the black springy kind that are pretty stout. Fill the tub up with water until the towel starts soaking it up and stays moist up the entire sides to the top of the towel.

Cons: a wet towel will lower the temperature a few degrees; you can make it more by setting a fan on low near it to move some air, but you don't want to overdo it. You'll have to keep adding water to the wash basin, and a wet towel will eventually start to mildew. Replace it with a clean one ASAP when that happens; no sense having wild critters growing too proliferatively around your meads.

The other method is definitely more worry-free and exact. You can get you a freezer and turn it into a cooler with one of those digital control thingies. Somebody else can explain it better than I can; there are lots of threads here on gotmead? about them. Basically, a digital thermostat checks the interior temperature of the freezer with a probe, and the digital thermostat regulates the on/off cycles to maintain the interior temp at the temp you want. This is the preferred method, for obvious reasons, but it can be a significant purchase.

Cons: price. But it's worth it.

moridin
05-08-2014, 12:55 AM
Yah well I'm hoping for a more pronounced black currant and cherry flavor, but you cNt complain about additional berries! My first mead I wanted to make was a blackberry.. Ended up doing a raspberry melomel instead since I was able to get better berries, I have to say, it's been almost a year and it is delicious, blackberry mead would be great. Definitely a project I will do soon , already have some vintners harvest blackberry purée :) how's your first mead experience so far?


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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 08:29 AM
Well so far it's good! I've got a jar sitting in the guest bedroom so it's nice and dark and kind of cool. Is 75 good for d47? And it smells delicious! I think waiting a whole year to drink it will be hard... But I am planning to make the JAOM tonight so I think that will help me wait on the drinking of my other one. I'm so excited for this stuff!


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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 08:32 AM
If 75 degrees is too hot for d47 then I'll probably try the wet towel method and just put a new towel on it every day so I don't make any of them mildew. I like the freezer idea but as of now I don't think I should spend that much money on this before I know if I'm any good at it...


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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 09:04 AM
It is bubbling 1 time every 3 seconds! Wow I'm so excited! Go yeasties go!


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EbonHawk
05-08-2014, 09:35 AM
It IS exciting! I keep hanging around my fermentation bucket, checking on it, smelling it, listening to it... I forgot just how exciting it is. It's been almost 7 years since I last brewed something. Non-brewers just don't understand the allure of concocting something that's going to take months to mature, and only moments to drink. But, those same individuals are plenty happy to help you drink up your stores of the stuff. Funny how that works out that way.

Aragorn
05-08-2014, 10:27 AM
Haha yeah I'm hoping maybe my friends won't like mead. Maybe then I will have more to myself! Or maybe they will join the obsession haha


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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 10:46 AM
How often should I check the SG?


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GntlKnigt1
05-08-2014, 11:17 AM
I take daily SG readings, and pH and temp and write it in my log...

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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 11:27 AM
Alright! I will do that :) and what is a good ph?


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EbonHawk
05-08-2014, 11:41 AM
I take daily SG readings, and pH and temp and write it in my log...
That's a lot of checking! I thought one of the main goals of this hobby was to "Relax!". I guess if checking those daily makes you happier, that could be construed as relaxation of a form. I guess I need to get me a wine thief or something similar so I can take readings more often.

Aragorn
05-08-2014, 11:42 AM
So how often do you check?


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GntlKnigt1
05-08-2014, 01:09 PM
.pH of 3.5 is nice....3.2 is warning track.....2.9 means add potassium carbonate. When fermentation is done, you can do almost anything you like, although there are interrelationships between recommended sulfite levels, pH, and alcohol content....

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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 03:17 PM
Sulfite levels? How do I measure that?


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GntlKnigt1
05-08-2014, 03:39 PM
Well...don't want to overwhelm too soon, but Be sure to stabilize before you bottle....

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Aragorn
05-08-2014, 04:01 PM
Stabilize as in use potassium sorbate?


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mannye
05-08-2014, 04:32 PM
I check very often. But remember. We drink the samples. So, yeah.


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GntlKnigt1
05-08-2014, 04:54 PM
Have to use both sorbate and sulfite to stabilize.

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mannye
05-08-2014, 05:07 PM
Have to use both sorbate and sulfite to stabilize.

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Yes! Check the forum for stabilization protocols. If you only use one you're risking off flavors. I'm not an expert on stabilizing since most times I don't, so I will defer to the more experienced.

If I did stabilize, I would do what GK or Medsen Fey says or Oskaar or any one of the dozens on here that know more than me about that stuff.

And don't not stabilize yet. I don't because I don't want to, but I've been doing fermented beverages for a long time and I've never had a bottle bomb. But that's because I'm a crazy maniac and like drunks and babies we get a pass.


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GntlKnigt1
05-09-2014, 03:01 AM
Here's one of the technical articles on sulfite, pH and alcohol.... In short, a final pH of about 3.0 at 12% ABV requires a lot less sulfite than a pH of 3.4.
http://www.gotmead.com/forum/entry.php/123-Sixth-blog-Sulfites-and-pH-alcohol-and-bacteria

(You may have to click on the link in the blog to get the tables to display correctly.)
http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/FS/FS-52-W.pdf

Aragorn
05-09-2014, 02:04 PM
Do you guys know if fractional freezing is legal or not? And are we allowed to talk about it on here?

Honeyhog
05-09-2014, 10:18 PM
It is and we can.

Aragorn
05-10-2014, 11:14 AM
So if you were to do a freeze concentration to like 25% ABV, would you still have to stabilize it?


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loveofrose
05-10-2014, 11:24 AM
Nope. Nothing is going to grow in 25% ABV. I will suggest you start with an extremely clean mead. When you freeze concentrate, you concentrate the fusels as well. Aging first, then freeze. Doesn't work the other way around.


Better brewing through science!

Aragorn
05-10-2014, 11:28 AM
Oh yeah! Definitely! And is it good when you freeze concentrate it?


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loveofrose
05-10-2014, 11:38 AM
Hmmm. It depends. It largely depends on what you concentrate. I've had some absolutely awful (Cyser). And others are wonderful (OB, tupelo).

They are definitely for sipping on a cold night when you aren't going anywhere. De got kick!


Better brewing through science!

Aragorn
05-10-2014, 11:52 AM
Haha yeah I figured they would be potent. How much sugar would I leave in it before I concentrated it?


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mannye
05-10-2014, 12:24 PM
Do you guys know if fractional freezing is legal or not? And are we allowed to talk about it on here?

It is illegal. I looked. Any kind of distillation is illegal unless you have the proper permits and yes, talking about it is frowned upon. So no, we are not allowed!

I got my ear pulled by the mods a while back for talking about it.


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Aragorn
05-10-2014, 12:27 PM
Haha alright then I will stop asking about it


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Aragorn
05-10-2014, 12:28 PM
How long does it take to get rid of the fusels?


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Honeyhog
05-10-2014, 05:36 PM
It is and we can.
Oops, I guess I was wrong. I think it depends on where you live if fractional distillation is illegal or not.

moridin
05-10-2014, 08:10 PM
I don't know if there is a specific time frame in which fusels will dissipate. But I do know it depends greatly on the intensity of the fusels . In some cases this could take years


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Aragorn
05-10-2014, 10:56 PM
Aw man... So if my D47 ferments at 75 degrees, will that make a lot of unwanted fusels that will take a ridiculously long time to metabolize?


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moridin
05-11-2014, 02:53 AM
Well I don't want to make it seems like I know this for a fact. That's simply from what I've heard others on this forum say. In reality this might only take 6 months. I think the key with mead is that patience is necessary, just hopefully not too much :)


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Aragorn
05-11-2014, 11:03 AM
Haha alright. Then I will cool down my mead and hopefully avoid more fusels! I tasted it and it tastes spicy


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Aragorn
05-11-2014, 11:07 AM
So in my JAOM, the foam went into the airlock a little. Is that okay or should I change the airlock?


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Honeyhog
05-11-2014, 11:28 AM
Clean the airlock out and put it back on.

Aragorn
05-11-2014, 12:22 PM
Okay. And is it normal for the top of the foam to be a little brown?


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EbonHawk
05-11-2014, 01:07 PM
Yes, some yeast and other "goodies" float around and get stuck on top of that krauesen (sp?). It's normal.

Aragorn
05-11-2014, 08:47 PM
Okay so at the 1/3 sugar break, do I just add the DAP and stir a little? Does it matter if it mixes all in? And does it matter if I disturb the sediment?


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Get_Wiggly
05-11-2014, 10:00 PM
DAP dissolves easily

moridin
05-11-2014, 10:35 PM
Really should be fine, when I added in my last servings of nutrients at the 1/3rd break I aerated it for a good 5 minutes


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Aragorn
05-11-2014, 10:38 PM
I was supposed to aerate it at the break too? I just put in some nutrient like an hour ago


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mannye
05-11-2014, 10:48 PM
You're fine. Don't worry. You can aerate again tomorrow.


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Aragorn
05-11-2014, 10:53 PM
Oh was I supposed to be aerating daily? Do I just shake it up?


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EbonHawk
05-12-2014, 01:10 AM
To aerate, or not to aerate, that is the question..

My readings have said it's a good idea to aerate if you have a large percentage of the batch as honey (#%? not sure) and if it's a particularly high starting OG (say, over 1.150 or more). So, why aerate? It makes the yeast happy, at first, and they need a good amount of oxygen during the first third of the fermentation process. I'm not sure how it coincides with step feeding though. Also, I can say it's a definite must (no pun intended) to aerate if you boiled your starting batch. Nothing drives off beneficial oxygen quicker than boiling.

So, I'm starting to see the benefits of aerating. I use a stainless steel stirring spoon, one of those big ones, with lots of tiny holes in it. Bought it at Wal-Mart, I think. But I really stir vigorously and keep it up for about 5 minutes. Others will say to stir multiple times a day at the beginning, so I tried that this go round with my cyser, and it fermented efficiently. I only aerated 4 times the first day, I believe it was. I would probably aerate more with a more traditional mead, probably daily, that contains mostly honey. I think it would help.

Aragorn
05-12-2014, 09:22 AM
Okay so you would only aerate in the first third and you would do it multiple times a day. But after that it's bad for the mead to have oxygen right? And if I don't do that, will my batch be significantly worse?


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EbonHawk
05-12-2014, 09:48 AM
I would aerate several times before pitching yeast on the first day, say four times for good aeration. You can also "cheat" and get an aquarium pump and air-stone, but I haven't tried that yet, only read about it. It's faster. From what I've read, I want to say some folks recommend aerating daily. Not sure if it was multiple times on the following days, but me personally, I think I would aerate once daily. Maybe some long-time mazers can elaborate on their findings. I would think daily aeration would be enough for my likes, because I wouldn't want to take the chance of contaminating my mead.

I only have experience with thick cysers, and how they respond to aeration and such, so my experience with meads is only what I've read and research I've done into it, so take that with a grain of salt. Cysers are similar in nature, but significantly different from meads.

In answer to whether it will be significantly worse... I think it mainly has to do with how well it ferments and goes to completion. Insufficient oxygen at the start will cause slow starts, possibly stuck fermentations at some midway point, etc. It just causes problems, or it can cause significantly increased fermentation times and more frustration for the mazer.

Aragorn
05-12-2014, 10:27 AM
Okay. I did do a lot of shaking and shaking and shaking before I pitched the yeast. It started just fine and it still seems to be fermenting happily :) so maybe it will be fine and I can start aerating on the next batch!


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Honeyhog
05-12-2014, 09:02 PM
Just make sure that you gently degas the mead before you shake the jug to aerate during active fermentation or you will have an MEA of Old Faithful sized proportions.

Aragorn
05-12-2014, 10:33 PM
Haha that just sounds like so much fun though!


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moridin
05-13-2014, 09:40 AM
Haha that just sounds like so much fun though!


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It's actually pretty cool, until you realiZe that you've lost liquid gold :)


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Aragorn
05-13-2014, 10:35 AM
Haha yeah I don't want to lose any of this deliciousness


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mannye
05-14-2014, 07:23 AM
It's actually pretty cool, until you realiZe that you've lost liquid gold :)


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You ain't kidding. With the price of honey, preventing an MEA isn't just good sanitary practice, it's good economics! Plus who wants all that hard work blowing out an airlock?

Best way to prevent MEA? Primary in a bucket. Especially if you're using fruit.

Best place to get free buckets? Your local cake/cupcake gourmet shop. The icing comes in food grade buckets.


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Aragorn
05-16-2014, 01:54 PM
Oh that's a clever idea! I'll have to go find a cake shop...

So if I am adding honey before it is done fermenting, how do I mix it? Cause I don't want to oxidize it


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mannye
05-16-2014, 02:28 PM
Very little danger of oxidizing an active fermentation. I guess if you really tried hard you could but trust me, it takes work to do it.

I don't know what the best way to add honey is, but I just pour it in straight. I get a nice thin pour going and stir it in. If some gets on the bottom don't sweat it. The yeast will find it and eat it.

Others will say to mix with water first, but I guess it depends on what you're trying to do.


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Aragorn
05-16-2014, 02:46 PM
So I tasted a sample and it doesn't taste very much like the mead I had before. It isn't very good at all... I don't know what could be wrong with it except that maybe there are lots of fusels. Can you describe that taste to me more? Everybody just says "hot" but that doesn't seem too helpful...


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GntlKnigt1
05-16-2014, 03:04 PM
See if this helps...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusel_alcohol

Aragorn
05-16-2014, 03:18 PM
The article didn't speak to the taste very much. My girlfriend said it tastes a little bitter


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Aragorn
05-16-2014, 04:29 PM
Okay so I added a little bit of honey because my girlfriend wants it to be sweet. So it was at a SG of 1.032 and now it is at 1.050. I put it in a secondary and added a little DAP because it was at the 2/3 break and then put the honey in. But now it doesn't seem to be doing anything. Do I need to repitch the yeast or will it be fine and keep fermenting happily?


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mannye
05-16-2014, 05:14 PM
First, you didn't have to move it, but you did so that's done. Second, if you recall, the D47 was going to make a mead that would take up to one year of aging to be good. The best way I can describe young mead is sharp, bitter and yeasty. Fusel tastes like turpentine to me and certain yeasts can also develop sulphur like flavors and odors. Most of these are said to age out.

Maybe someone with more experience with d-47 can chime in here. I don't have any beyond having aome in my fridge I was going to use for a JAOM but then didn't because it would take a year to age out.

What you need to do with that batch is let it finish (don't rack it until you have added all the honey and the fermentation is over) then rack it off the lees into a proper secondary, put an airlock on it and forget about it for 6 months then taste it.

While you wait, make a BOMM.


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Aragorn
05-16-2014, 11:10 PM
Alright next time I will not move it! That makes it one step simpler. What type of yeast do you use?

And also, when should I add the cinnamon and clove? Should I age it with them in it for the full year? Or just for a little bit at the end?


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mannye
05-17-2014, 10:35 AM
You can add them now. Easy on the clove. A little goes a long way. One clove and two cinnamon sticks is good for one gallon. Keep them in there for about six weeks.


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Aragorn
05-17-2014, 10:38 AM
What's the best way to get them out after 6 weeks?


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mannye
05-17-2014, 10:46 AM
Well, if you're still adding honey you're technically still on primary ferment. When it's all done, you rack into the "real" secondary and leave them behind.


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Aragorn
05-17-2014, 11:34 AM
Ah I see. Then I'll go ahead and add them! Thank you sir


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Aragorn
05-18-2014, 09:13 PM
Okay so I tossed in the two sticks of cinnamon and 1 clove today. It is bubbling like crazy! How far along in the fermentation will it start to bubble slower?


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mannye
05-18-2014, 10:11 PM
Should take 3 to 7 days to slow down but every yeast is different.


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Aragorn
05-18-2014, 10:14 PM
As in that long after I pitch the yeast? Or from when I added that extra bit of honey? Cause it is going faster now than it did in the first week


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mannye
05-18-2014, 10:35 PM
A ferment can take as little as three days to as long as a month. It depends on nutrients, type of yeast, temperature and a whole lot of other variables not the least of which are the idiosyncrasies of your particular batch of yeast. The important thing to worry about isn't how long it takes, but what's going on. Particularly with the smells. If you smell anything nasty (the most common issue is hydrogen sulfide...rotten egg smell) you need to add nutrient and aerate... Things like that.

I'm sure that within a week it will calm down and start to relax. You will know for sure if it's done when the hydrometer readings don't change for a week.

Them you can rack off the lees and let it age.


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Aragorn
05-18-2014, 10:37 PM
Perfect! So a yeasty smell is okay?


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mannye
05-18-2014, 11:29 PM
Yeast, honey, anything pleasant.


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Aragorn
05-23-2014, 11:29 PM
It smells so good... How long does the SG have to be constant before I cold crash and move it to a proper secondary? And should I get Camden tablets to rack it onto? Or will it be better without them?


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moridin
05-24-2014, 05:26 AM
Usually three days of the same sg indicates fermentation is complete



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mannye
05-27-2014, 10:06 AM
A week is better. Even then it may just have slowed to the point where day to day you won't notice a difference but it will still make a bomb if you cap it.

If you haven't noticed a change in a week, rack to a secondary and get it off the gross lees. Airlock it and keep an eye on it for a few weeks. It may still have co2 in solution that needs to escape.


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Chevette Girl
05-29-2014, 07:14 PM
And the campden tablets are a good idea, especially if there's still any sugar left in your mead. While you're at it, you might want to get some potassium sorbate as well, sort of a one-two punch to the yeasties so they don't wake back up.

Aragorn
06-05-2014, 02:11 PM
Do the campden tablets or potassium sorbate give any bad flavors or smells to it?


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mannye
06-05-2014, 10:10 PM
Most folks advocate using both. Something about geranium odor if you only use one. I haven't used them... but if you're going to bottle it is advisable. I don't know what the actual procedures are...

antonioh
06-06-2014, 05:02 AM
Kmeta in doses of 300 mg / L can be tasted

But the amount of SO2 to use depends on pH.

Aragorn
06-06-2014, 08:50 AM
Hmmm maybe I'll just skip this step and not bottle it either... I tasted it and it's delicious so I don't think it'll make it more than like two days once we start on it. We'll probably drink it around Christmas time so I'll just bulk age till then


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Aragorn
06-16-2014, 01:17 PM
Well I just moved it over to the secondary with a FG of 1.014 and it tasted great (if a bit 'hot' though). Two weeks ago it tasted more like the cinnamon than it does now. Will that come back? And the 'hot' taste should go away with age right?


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