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Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 02:13 PM
Im looki n g to make this a hobby but came up with the initial idea of doing this for an exclusive drink at my wedding reception my question is what is the best yeast to use for making mead im look for a % between 14-20% but dont want it to be a really dry mead

Marshmallow Blue
05-07-2014, 02:31 PM
My recommendation would be Red-star Cotes De Blancs, that tends to leave some residual sweetness (except in cysers (maybe because of higher acid content?)), and is pretty tolerant of temps (I'd still try to keep it under 75). Congrats on your wedding! I just had mine a few weeks ago. And welcome to GotMead.

What kind of turnaround time are you looking for?

Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 03:26 PM
Thanks for the welcome I hope to have great experiences here ... And the wedding isn't for another year so im trying to get it together early so it can have at least a year to age

Marshmallow Blue
05-07-2014, 03:45 PM
Thanks for the welcome I hope to have great experiences here ... And the wedding isn't for another year so im trying to get it together early so it can have at least a year to age

Good Good, remember to check with your reception vendor that they will allow you to bring your own.

Bob1016
05-07-2014, 03:48 PM
Can you keg? I only ask because you could do a sweet mead with a light honey for an SG ~1.110-1.120 and use D47, leave it on the yeast for most of the aging then force carb it for a semi-sweet champagne style mead.
Specifically what style, abv, sweetness are you looking for? This will dictate what yeast should be chosen. BOMM is an option, but if your looking for more of a wine/champagne like mead wine yeast will be the best bet.


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Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 04:12 PM
I am allowed to bring my own to the venue and I hadn't thought of making it like a champagne and im looking for the abv to fall between 14 and 20 as for type of sweet my attention had frequently been drawn to Melomel recipes abs think I may be leaning towards that

Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 04:15 PM
And what do you mean by keg?

Marshmallow Blue
05-07-2014, 04:26 PM
Like kegging beer and serving it on draft.

Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 04:28 PM
oh no I was planning to bottle it that way there would be some to be taken home as souvenirs if ppl wanted

GntlKnigt1
05-07-2014, 05:19 PM
http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php?t=22545
Bitterness eliminated with backsweetening

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Bob1016
05-07-2014, 05:24 PM
Actually I was going to say bottle it from the keg, something about the presentation of a bottle is appealing. The keg is one of the easiest ways to carbonate a sweet mead, that's why I asked.
What side of 14-20? 14-16 is a lot easier than 18-20. For the first, most yeast strains will reach that, for high abv there are only a few that can do it good, and it's going to take longer to age. A great Abv for meads is 14%, not too strong, but it has enough honey to get the flavor and not have to worry about body/mouthfeel issues. D47 does this very well and will chew through ~100 gravity points (plus or minus 5-10 depending on technique).


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Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 06:35 PM
oh ok well that is something to think on then I may look into what you said about the keg thing but that doesn't alter the flavoring of the mead does it ... and im thinking probably around 16 I don't want the batch to be too potent might nake a small personal one on the higher end to see how that turns out and as far as the aging goes im looking at at least a year to age any thing longer than that won't meet my deadline

Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 06:39 PM
@gntlknigt1 I appreciate the attempt on the link but I can't get access to it being a basic member and all

Bob1016
05-07-2014, 07:25 PM
Trust me 14 is going to be better than 16abv given the time frame.
Booster blanc (@0.25g/L, or ~1g/gal) and tannin ft blanc soft (@0.05g/L or ~ 0.2g/gal) reduce a lot of the "new mead" flavor, and making it sweet will help a lot as well. Also oak tends to bring the meads into their own a little faster then no oak meads. Also, make sure you give plenty of nutrients, around 200-250ppm YAN (2-2.5g/L, or 7.5-9.5g/gal fermaid K, or mix in some fermaid O towards the end), and stir as often as possible (>4 times a day) as they seem to require less aging. This holds true for any low N, low sulfur production, wine yeast, the only variable is the desired abv, which can be sidestepped if you don't mind using potassium sorbate and SO2 to stabilize it and backsweeten.


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Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 07:38 PM
your being a great help so far but like I said being new to this I don't know a whole lot about the processes but isnt potassium sorbate bad for you like toxic bad ... if I can avoid aging any extra chemicals to it I would prefer to go that route .. ive got a copy of compleat meadmaker on the way in the mail hopefully itll help me out so I'm not as lost in the whole process but hey we all start somewhere right

mannye
05-07-2014, 07:38 PM
If you're really a beginner, as in hasn't made any type of fermented beverage before, I really suggest you read the JAOM thread (that's in the general members section) and the BOMM thread. I think given your one year time frame, you have enough time to try out JAOM, which is ready in 2 months or so (three tops) and very very easy to make. You don't even need any of the special equipment, just go to the local supermarket. THEN...once you're done with that, you will know if making mead is for you or not. Because frankly, if you can't get a JAOM to work, BOMM is going to be worse. BOMM however, is ready in as little as 30 days! It just requires more specialized ingredients and equipment. If your JAOM turned out great, then BOMM will be easy peasy lemon squeezy. AND you will be ready with plenty of time to age it for a few months, which only makes BOMM even better. But these things can't be rushed. (any more than we already are)

Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 08:21 PM
yea im a begginer as in this is gonna be my first batch but I will try the suggested forums you have there and see how it works out for me

Honeyhog
05-07-2014, 08:46 PM
Lalvin K1-v1116 yeast would get you to 16% and it's temperature tolerant. It's what I use for my traditionals.

Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 09:48 PM
when you au temperature tolerant what range are we talking?

fatbloke
05-07-2014, 11:33 PM
All wine yeast tends to have a temp range where it'll work best, without causing flavour issues or make fusels.

The D47 mentioned by Bob is a good yeast, but needs fermenting at less than 70F/21C otherwise its known to produce fusels in honey musts.....

K1V-1116 just happens to have one of the widest temp ranges (10 - 35C). If you had time etc then you could do experiments etc.......

As it is, a year or so isn't that long in the mead world. I suspect you'd be better placed thinking on the lines of the JAOM and/or BOMM recipes.

Hollywood13
05-07-2014, 11:42 PM
yes that's the conclusion I am coming to based on the information that im seeing and recieving and it will just be a Mayer of which I like best

mannye
05-08-2014, 11:31 AM
Well then all you have to do now is get started! Only thing for JAOM is if you don't have a one gallon glass carboy get a cheap gallon of wine or apple cider and use that. You can make sangria with the wine or drink the apple cider.


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Hollywood13
05-08-2014, 01:20 PM
will do soon hopefully it will turn out good

mannye
05-08-2014, 04:48 PM
Is that Hollywood CA or FL? Cause if it's FL, I can go help you out.


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Hollywood13
05-16-2014, 07:54 PM
Neither I stay in Georgia actually its a nickname I picked up in my party days for being flashy

Riverat
05-17-2014, 09:13 AM
Neither I stay in Georgia actually its a nickname I picked up in my party days for being flashy

All the way up the Ogeechee from my place!;D

Hollywood13
05-24-2014, 10:51 PM
ALRIGHT fellas I got my first batch brewing based off a variation of Bob's joam recipe but I used blackberries instead of oranges and dates instead of raisins. . I also used the Lalvin K1 -v1116

fatbloke
05-25-2014, 02:48 AM
ALRIGHT fellas I got my first batch brewing based off a variation of Bob's joam recipe but I used blackberries instead of oranges and dates instead of raisins. . I also used the Lalvin K1 -v1116
Well your variation is all to the good, is what I'm thinking.

The basics of the JAO recipe is that while orange is used, the pithy bitterness that results from that, is balanced out by the residual sugar that results from using bread yeast. If you'd stuck to the main JAO recipe, your use of a wine yeast would have likely taken it dry and that would have focused the flavour on the pithy bitterness as there'd have been little to mask it.

So I'm now thinking that you'll get a dry mead (may not need any energiser because of the fruit - keep an eye on it as long as it progresses ok ferments down and doesn't produce any off smells its likely fine).

I'd suggest you put some thought into what you want from the mead, flavour-wise.......

why ? Because the majority of the fruit flavour is attached to the natural fruit flavours. So if the chosen fruit is just nutrient and colour and not so much residual fruit taste, great. If you were hoping for a more fruity flavour, then you're likely gonna have to think on stabilising the brew once its finished and either more fruit into secondary or that plus back sweetening further down the line......

Think on the flavour of grape juice and wine, and the dissimilarity of them.........

Hollywood13
05-25-2014, 10:54 AM
well I was really hoping for it to have a hint of the blackberry flavoring not like mouth full of blackberries bit I def wanted you to know they were part of it worth a suttle flavoring

fatbloke
05-26-2014, 05:44 AM
Well, with that in mind, maybe using a yeast that helps with flavour/colour retention, like RC-212 (care needs to be taken as it's a nutrient hog), and then if you work out that you want to use X amount of fruit per gallon, then maybe split it, using half in the primary and half in the secondary or 2/3rds in primary and 1/3 in secondary.

I'd have thought that would give you enough of the original blackberry flavour without it being too much.

Equally, if you make it "medium" by fermenting dry in primary, then adding the second part of the fruit to secondary for a month, then once it's racked off the fruit, test gravity and back sweeten it to no more than 1.010 you would get the kind of effect that you mention above.....

Hollywood13
05-30-2014, 11:29 AM
Thanks that's something I'll keep in mind for my next batch long as this one goes well except im only 2 weeks in and my air lock seems to have stopped bubbling already the fermentation process shouldn't be done yet none of the fruit have sank Im starting to think I may have messed up some where

fatbloke
05-31-2014, 05:42 AM
Probably not. Fermentation can indeed finish or slow noticably, relatively soon. Most people when new to this, worry some because they presume that the fruit will drop instantly that the fermentation is complete.

Ain't gonna happen. If it's made following the basic JAO protocol, then it can take a couple of months for the fruit to drop. Keep it in a dark place or cover the fermenter and let it do it's thing. It'll clear and drop the fruit in it's own time.......

Hollywood13
05-31-2014, 10:09 AM
Thanks for clearing that up I was thinking that the dropped fruit was a sure sign the fermentation was done

Stasis
05-31-2014, 11:17 AM
I'm sure different fruit drop at different times. Even oranges in JAOM drop at different times for different people. Probably a lot of factors such as density of fruit, residual sugar in mead and temperature of mead. While the dropping of fruit is part of the JAOM method I don't think this is necessary otherwise. Probably removing it earlier also has some merits with certain yeasts because it racks the mead off the lees (especially if some months have passed). Leaving the fruit might have an effect like adding some fruit to secondary, meaning the mead will end up with more of the fruit's taste.

I wonder... How long should a person keep fruit in a mead if he is not following JAOM protocol?

Mrcloc
06-02-2014, 08:21 AM
Hi,

My first mead fermented in a few days. I was a bit worried it fermented too quickly, but it turned out great. Took much longer to clear than to ferment - was don'e fermenting in 3 or 4 days, started clearing withing a week and took 4 weeks to clear properly. A pineapple I made recently I pulled out the pineapple after primary. I'm glad I did because the unique flavour isn't overshadowed by pineapple - it's sort of an undertone. I'm watching this to see your results.

Hollywood13
06-02-2014, 10:52 PM
ill probably take out the black berries after the first ferment cause I want the subtle flavoring and I think it only took about a week to ferment but it is starting to clear a bit so im looking forward to good results

Hollywood13
06-20-2014, 10:31 PM
Just an update on my mead guys tje fruit havent dropped yet but it seems to be clearing up nicely im keeping and eye out it for any strange changes tho

Hollywood13
01-16-2015, 06:37 PM
Sorry I hadn't been. On to update but it turned out great cracked the bottles open for Christmas and turned out to be a good semi sweet and a real subtle hint of black berry I think next time I'll try to make something more full flavored